Credit Card Use on Web CAUTION

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Brad Petria, Dec 22, 2003.

  1. Brad Petria

    Brad Petria Guest

    Hi,

    An article In Sunday's newspaper about another security bug
    found in Internet Explorer: "that allows scammers to make phony sites
    look even more authentic than usual. Instead of betraying their origin
    by showing the wrong address under IE's toolbar, phony sites can
    appear to have the same address as the real thing."

    Brad

    Tip for your old computer (reduce discard pollution too):

    If you can't sell your old computer, don't throw it away. Use it to backup
    your software by transferring files/folders from your new computer or laptop
    to it. I transferred my Windows folder and other stuff to my old computer
    using "PC Link", which I downloaded from www.simtel.net (cool site).

    http://www.simtel.net/pub/pd/52792.html (info or download)
    Brad Petria, Dec 22, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Brad Petria

    Jerry G. Guest

    You are right about this one. If someone takes out a domain name and puts a
    simple re-direct on to it, the re-direct will make Explorer's address bar
    have the new domain name in it, rather than the re-directed name in it. This
    is a very big trick that the dishonest Spammers are doing.

    --

    Some Safety Rules To Follow:
    NEVER buy anything from any unsolicited emails (Spam mail). NEVER simply
    email any sensitive information, unless you are very sure that you are on a
    secure email at both ends, and you specifically know who the receiver is.
    NEVER open or preview any Spam mail. Delete it on sight!

    ALWAYS manually type the name of the site in the tool bar to go to the site
    to make the purchase. This way you will be sure that you are there, and not
    through a re-direct. Only use a link if you know for sure that it will be
    safe. Some legitimate sites are on a re-directed page. They will have their
    contact information, and you will be able to speak to someone on the phone
    about this. If you cannot verify the operation of their site, DO NOT conduct
    business with them.

    If you are on a legitimate site with a link on it to make a purchase, this
    should be safe. Honest site operators will always have a page where there
    will be a phone number and address listed, to where they can be contacted.
    If you are on a site that there is no contact information listed, DO NOT
    give them any information.

    You can also call the manufacture of the product that you are interested in.
    You can enquire to see if the company selling the product is registered with
    them, or the vendor is authorized to sell it. The vendor may be selling the
    product through another authorized distributor. This can all be checked out.
    If you cannot get in touch with the manufacture, then there will most likely
    be a problem for parts and service after you own the product. In this case,
    the product should not be purchased, if it is expensive.

    When using any type of credit card, or giving out sensitive information,
    ALWAYS check to see if the padlock is being displayed in the information
    section of the lower toolbar in Explorer. If there is no padlock displayed
    DO NOT give out any sensitive information over the system. Some unscrupulous
    operators actually put a small icon of a padlock on their site, to fool non
    experienced users. If the padlock does not appear in the information bar
    part of the frame of Explorer itself, then it is not legitimate.

    If you are on a legitimate site, there should be a phone number and name
    published on the site. You should be able to call them up on the phone, and
    speak to a representative. Always take down their full name. You should also
    be able to verify the place of business through a phone book, or business
    publication of some type. If you do not want to put your credit card number
    through the system, but want to use it, you can always do your business over
    the phone. Legitimate companies will usually be set up to take phone orders.
    Remember that the person answering the phone will then have your credit card
    information. Take down their full name.

    There are also ways to verify a company through local government agencies in
    their country of location. This involves more work. If you really don't
    trust them with a credit card, you can always ask them for their mailing
    address, and take the gamble of sending an international bank draft to them.
    This way, they will not have your credit card number to use at their own
    will.


    --

    Greetings,

    Jerry Greenberg GLG Technologies GLG
    =========================================
    WebPage http://www.zoom-one.com
    Electronics http://www.zoom-one.com/electron.htm
    =========================================



    "Brad Petria" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    Hi,

    An article In Sunday's newspaper about another security bug
    found in Internet Explorer: "that allows scammers to make phony sites
    look even more authentic than usual. Instead of betraying their origin
    by showing the wrong address under IE's toolbar, phony sites can
    appear to have the same address as the real thing."

    Brad

    Tip for your old computer (reduce discard pollution too):

    If you can't sell your old computer, don't throw it away. Use it to
    backup
    your software by transferring files/folders from your new computer or laptop
    to it. I transferred my Windows folder and other stuff to my old computer
    using "PC Link", which I downloaded from www.simtel.net (cool site).

    http://www.simtel.net/pub/pd/52792.html (info or download)
    Jerry G., Dec 22, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Brad Petria

    Matt Ferrari Guest

    "Jerry G." <> wrote in message
    news:bs7043$4db$...
    > You are right about this one. If someone takes out a domain name and puts

    a
    > simple re-direct on to it, the re-direct will make Explorer's address bar
    > have the new domain name in it, rather than the re-directed name in it.

    This
    > is a very big trick that the dishonest Spammers are doing.
    >
    >


    Just an FYI, Brad is a spammer. He posts arbitrary advice usually
    1 or 2 lines like "look both ways before crossing the street",
    or questions he already knows the answer to, like which way does
    a cd rom go in the computer? upside down or right side up?
    and then plonks on 15 lines of his spam message at the bottom.
    The message at the bottom is actually his only reason for posting.
    Matt Ferrari, Dec 22, 2003
    #3
  4. Brad Petria

    DeMoN LaG Guest

    "Jerry G." <> wrote in
    news:bs7043$4db$:

    > You are right about this one. If someone takes out a domain name and
    > puts a simple re-direct on to it, the re-direct will make Explorer's
    > address bar have the new domain name in it, rather than the
    > re-directed name in it. This is a very big trick that the dishonest
    > Spammers are doing.
    >


    An easy way to avoid this is simply don't accept ludicrous security holes
    like this and not use IE.

    --
    AIM: FrznFoodClerk
    email: de_on-lag@co_cast.net (_ = m)
    website: under construction
    Need a technician in the south Jersey area?
    email/IM for rates/services
    DeMoN LaG, Dec 22, 2003
    #4
  5. This really doesn't have a lot to do with the OP's warning though. His
    warning was about sites that *appear* to be legitimate, e.g.
    www.citibank.com when they're actually something else. Since a spammer,
    honest or dishonest, would have a tough time taking out the domain name
    citibank.com they'd couldn't use the trick the OP was warning about.

    I like your tips though.

    Jerry G. wrote:
    > You are right about this one. If someone takes out a domain name and puts a
    > simple re-direct on to it, the re-direct will make Explorer's address bar
    > have the new domain name in it, rather than the re-directed name in it. This
    > is a very big trick that the dishonest Spammers are doing.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Some Safety Rules To Follow:
    > NEVER buy anything from any unsolicited emails (Spam mail). NEVER simply
    > email any sensitive information, unless you are very sure that you are on a
    > secure email at both ends, and you specifically know who the receiver is.
    > NEVER open or preview any Spam mail. Delete it on sight!
    >
    > ALWAYS manually type the name of the site in the tool bar to go to the site
    > to make the purchase. This way you will be sure that you are there, and not
    > through a re-direct. Only use a link if you know for sure that it will be
    > safe. Some legitimate sites are on a re-directed page. They will have their
    > contact information, and you will be able to speak to someone on the phone
    > about this. If you cannot verify the operation of their site, DO NOT conduct
    > business with them.
    >
    > If you are on a legitimate site with a link on it to make a purchase, this
    > should be safe. Honest site operators will always have a page where there
    > will be a phone number and address listed, to where they can be contacted.
    > If you are on a site that there is no contact information listed, DO NOT
    > give them any information.
    >
    > You can also call the manufacture of the product that you are interested in.
    > You can enquire to see if the company selling the product is registered with
    > them, or the vendor is authorized to sell it. The vendor may be selling the
    > product through another authorized distributor. This can all be checked out.
    > If you cannot get in touch with the manufacture, then there will most likely
    > be a problem for parts and service after you own the product. In this case,
    > the product should not be purchased, if it is expensive.
    >
    > When using any type of credit card, or giving out sensitive information,
    > ALWAYS check to see if the padlock is being displayed in the information
    > section of the lower toolbar in Explorer. If there is no padlock displayed
    > DO NOT give out any sensitive information over the system. Some unscrupulous
    > operators actually put a small icon of a padlock on their site, to fool non
    > experienced users. If the padlock does not appear in the information bar
    > part of the frame of Explorer itself, then it is not legitimate.
    >
    > If you are on a legitimate site, there should be a phone number and name
    > published on the site. You should be able to call them up on the phone, and
    > speak to a representative. Always take down their full name. You should also
    > be able to verify the place of business through a phone book, or business
    > publication of some type. If you do not want to put your credit card number
    > through the system, but want to use it, you can always do your business over
    > the phone. Legitimate companies will usually be set up to take phone orders.
    > Remember that the person answering the phone will then have your credit card
    > information. Take down their full name.
    >
    > There are also ways to verify a company through local government agencies in
    > their country of location. This involves more work. If you really don't
    > trust them with a credit card, you can always ask them for their mailing
    > address, and take the gamble of sending an international bank draft to them.
    > This way, they will not have your credit card number to use at their own
    > will.
    >
    >
    Calvin Crumrine, Dec 22, 2003
    #5
    1. Advertising

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