CPU Question

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by Terry, Jul 14, 2003.

  1. Terry

    Terry Guest

    I just got a Gigabyte 1394 AMD Motherboard with A Thermaltake Volcano11
    with a Athalon 2400 XP CPU .
    What is the cpu temperature on the board supposed to be .
    I get between 148 and 150 degrees if this is running to hot for this
    Processor can anyone offer any suggestions?
    The Thermaltake is recommened for the 2400
    What are some other peoples view on the subject?
    P.S. used Artic Silver for the thermal grease!
     
    Terry, Jul 14, 2003
    #1
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  2. Terry

    Ghost Guest

    In article <sTqQa.420$>, Terry
    <> wrote:

    > I just got a Gigabyte 1394 AMD Motherboard with A Thermaltake Volcano11
    > with a Athalon 2400 XP CPU .
    > What is the cpu temperature on the board supposed to be .
    > I get between 148 and 150 degrees if this is running to hot for this
    > Processor can anyone offer any suggestions?
    > The Thermaltake is recommened for the 2400
    > What are some other peoples view on the subject?
    > P.S. used Artic Silver for the thermal grease!




    The simple answer is you should not have gotten an AMD... they have
    historically been very bad as far as heat goes...

    However, since you already have it, you have to cool it as much as you
    can. A heatsink the size of Rhode Island comes to mind... lol
    Seriously, get a very large heatsink, and several fans.

    Oh, and no arguments from the peanut gallery out there, OK??? AMD is a
    very hot chip. If you lose a heatsink or cooling fans, you could easily
    burn the chip and/or the mobo. This is not an opinion. It is absolute
    fact. Any tech who has been around the block and verify this. Yes, AMD
    is fast and AMD is cheap, but you get what you pay for. Heat is an issue
    with AMDs.
     
    Ghost, Jul 15, 2003
    #2
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  3. Terry

    Nick Guest

    I could not agree with you more! I can remember one
    time in particular. I was testing a main board and the
    power lead to the CPU fan was not working. It only
    took a few seconds to notice this, but it was already
    too late. The CPU had a big burned spot on it and the
    smell was very disturbing. That is one of the reasons
    that I have always had a certain dislike for AMD chips.
    --

    Nick
    A+, MCP
     
    Nick, Jul 15, 2003
    #3
  4. Terry

    Ghost Guest

    In article <qXHQa.2996$>, Nick
    <> wrote:

    > I could not agree with you more! I can remember one
    > time in particular. I was testing a main board and the
    > power lead to the CPU fan was not working. It only
    > took a few seconds to notice this, but it was already
    > too late. The CPU had a big burned spot on it and the
    > smell was very disturbing. That is one of the reasons
    > that I have always had a certain dislike for AMD chips.




    Yuppers... I do not sell AMD chips at all!!! I have had many people call
    or stop in asking for AM. I try to talk them into Intel, but if they are
    that determined to buy AMD, I send them up the road.




    Bob's Second Law of Computing: Once you release that magic smoke, ya just
    cannot get it all stuffed back inside those little tiny chips!!! lol
     
    Ghost, Jul 15, 2003
    #4
  5. Terry

    Bret Guest

    On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 23:25:17 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:

    >In article <sTqQa.420$>, Terry
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> I just got a Gigabyte 1394 AMD Motherboard with A Thermaltake Volcano11
    >> with a Athalon 2400 XP CPU .
    >> What is the cpu temperature on the board supposed to be .
    >> I get between 148 and 150 degrees if this is running to hot for this
    >> Processor can anyone offer any suggestions?
    >> The Thermaltake is recommened for the 2400
    >> What are some other peoples view on the subject?
    >> P.S. used Artic Silver for the thermal grease!

    >
    >
    >
    >The simple answer is you should not have gotten an AMD... they have
    >historically been very bad as far as heat goes...
    >
    >However, since you already have it, you have to cool it as much as you
    >can. A heatsink the size of Rhode Island comes to mind... lol
    >Seriously, get a very large heatsink, and several fans.
    >
    >Oh, and no arguments from the peanut gallery out there, OK??? AMD is a
    >very hot chip. If you lose a heatsink or cooling fans, you could easily
    >burn the chip and/or the mobo. This is not an opinion. It is absolute
    >fact. Any tech who has been around the block and verify this. Yes, AMD
    >is fast and AMD is cheap, but you get what you pay for. Heat is an issue
    >with AMDs.


    I'm running a 2400XP in a GA7VAXP ultra with a standard AMD supplied
    heatsink and fan, temperature varies beetween 36 and 38 degrees C.
    I don't consider it hot, what temp does your Intel run at?
     
    Bret, Jul 15, 2003
    #5
  6. Terry

    Lee Parsons Guest

    On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 23:25:17 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:
    >Oh, and no arguments from the peanut gallery out there, OK??? AMD is a
    >very hot chip. If you lose a heatsink or cooling fans, you could easily
    >burn the chip and/or the mobo. This is not an opinion. It is absolute
    >fact. Any tech who has been around the block and verify this. Yes, AMD
    >is fast and AMD is cheap, but you get what you pay for. Heat is an issue
    >with AMDs.



    I've sold a lot of them and have only lost one -- which I personally
    crushed getting a heatsink onto. (Hey, it was my very first!)

    I really have had no problems with them.
     
    Lee Parsons, Jul 15, 2003
    #6
  7. Terry

    Ghost Guest

    In article <>, "SBFan2000"
    <> wrote:

    > Haven't had problems with any AMDs, but not had any with Intel either! Both
    > are fine chips, both with pros and cons. Its up to the individual on what
    > they sell but it seems stupid to refuse to do a system because someone wants
    > a chip you don't like! I use to absolutely hate Intel chips but if someone
    > was willing to pay for one I built them one!! I hated/still hate Celerons
    > and Durons but would build one if someone requested it, althought it would
    > be stupid to request one now! :) If they got the money they get want they
    > want, I might suggest something but its their money and I'll take it and
    > make what they want! Seems stupid to say, (sorry but I have a hatred for
    > that item so take your money and leave!) I could see saying that the item
    > has problems and will not be warrantied but if they still want it, build it!
    >
    >
    > "Lee Parsons" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 23:25:17 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:
    > > >Oh, and no arguments from the peanut gallery out there, OK??? AMD is a
    > > >very hot chip. If you lose a heatsink or cooling fans, you could easily
    > > >burn the chip and/or the mobo. This is not an opinion. It is absolute
    > > >fact. Any tech who has been around the block and verify this. Yes, AMD
    > > >is fast and AMD is cheap, but you get what you pay for. Heat is an issue
    > > >with AMDs.

    > >
    > >
    > > I've sold a lot of them and have only lost one -- which I personally
    > > crushed getting a heatsink onto. (Hey, it was my very first!)
    > >
    > > I really have had no problems with them.




    Perhaps... by the standard of many- if someone wants it and is going to
    pay good money for it, sell it...

    I have higher standards. There is one thing you will get in my shop that
    you wont get in most others- integrity! I will not sell a product I do
    not have confidence in. I do not care how green your money is.

    If you want to buy a brand new Quantum hard drive, you will have to go up
    the street. If you want an integrated motherboard, you will go up the
    street. If you want one of those super cheap $500 computers, you will go
    up the street. If you want WinXP Home, you will go up the street. There
    are certain things I do not sell.

    I had a guy desperately wanting me to build him a cheapo computer. He
    could not understand how I could turn down the sale- he would say (just
    like you) "But it is money in your pocket!" I told him "Yeah, but when it
    dies in 6 months or a year, who are you going to be mad at?"

    Computers are difficult enough without adding fuel to the fire. When you
    are in the business a while- especially if you are the boss- you will find
    repeat business as not so small a part of your business. What you do not
    want is the customer coming back time after time to fix problems with a
    computer you built. It does not make you look good at all.

    After all is said and done, you have nothing but your reputation to
    distinguish you from all the fly-by-nighters in this business. We have
    many, many shops in this business who could not stand up to peer review,
    and certainly would fail any kind of a test put on by the news stations
    around the country. You know the story- they bring in a computer they
    know is perfectly fine, or has a minor problem, and see what kind of a job
    you do trying to fix it- and how much you charge.

    Think about it- a customer is trusting you to fix their computer-
    correctly, and cost effectively. Sometimes you have to tell them their
    computer is shot and needs to be replaced, or needs a new motherboard or
    some other expensive part, etc. They have to trust you.

    So no, I do not sell any product I feel that has a good chance of being a
    problem down the road. If that means I lose a sale or two, big deal. I
    will not compromise myself.

    I know I have lost the occassional CPU sale, but I do not think I have
    lost very many system builds to another shop. Once I explain to my
    customers why I do not sell certain products, they generally understand,
    and then agree with me. They do not want crap. If they are going to
    spend the money, why not spend a few extra dollars and buy the best they
    can afford.

    Oh, and by the way- that guy who wanted that cheapo system finally bought
    a nice custom built system from me- and he is *VERY* happy with it.

    So, my suggestion to you, and all other techs that have decision making
    authority- set your standards high, and keep them there. Selling
    something to someone because the money is green- even though you now it is
    an inferior product- is nothing short of being a whore! There are plenty
    of whores out there.
     
    Ghost, Jul 15, 2003
    #7
  8. Terry

    Lee Parsons Guest

    On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 12:19:33 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:

    >In article <>, "SBFan2000"
    ><> wrote:
    >> "Lee Parsons" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 23:25:17 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:
    >> > >Oh, and no arguments from the peanut gallery out there, OK??? AMD is a
    >> > >very hot chip. If you lose a heatsink or cooling fans, you could easily
    >> > >burn the chip and/or the mobo. This is not an opinion. It is absolute
    >> > >fact. Any tech who has been around the block and verify this. Yes, AMD
    >> > >is fast and AMD is cheap, but you get what you pay for. Heat is an issue
    >> > >with AMDs.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > I've sold a lot of them and have only lost one -- which I personally
    >> > crushed getting a heatsink onto. (Hey, it was my very first!)
    >> >
    >> > I really have had no problems with them.

    >
    >
    >
    >I have higher standards.


    Do not confust biases with standards.

    > There is one thing you will get in my shop that
    >you wont get in most others- integrity!


    Do not confuse integrity with an inflated ego.

    Your intimation that anyone who sells AMD-based systems lacks
    integrity and is a whore is insulting and narrow-minded.

    > I will not sell a product I do
    >not have confidence in.


    Well, how about that -- that same as most of us. But some of us DO
    have confidence in AMD processors and systems because they have worked
    just fine for us and our customers.

    You are entitled to your prejudices, but don't belittle everyone else
    because they don't share in them.
     
    Lee Parsons, Jul 15, 2003
    #8
  9. Terry

    Ghost Guest

    In article <>, Lee Parsons
    <> wrote:

    > On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 12:19:33 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:
    >
    > >In article <>, "SBFan2000"
    > ><> wrote:
    > >> "Lee Parsons" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:...
    > >> > On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 23:25:17 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:
    > >> > >Oh, and no arguments from the peanut gallery out there, OK??? AMD is a
    > >> > >very hot chip. If you lose a heatsink or cooling fans, you could easily
    > >> > >burn the chip and/or the mobo. This is not an opinion. It is absolute
    > >> > >fact. Any tech who has been around the block and verify this. Yes, AMD
    > >> > >is fast and AMD is cheap, but you get what you pay for. Heat is

    an issue
    > >> > >with AMDs.
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> > I've sold a lot of them and have only lost one -- which I personally
    > >> > crushed getting a heatsink onto. (Hey, it was my very first!)
    > >> >
    > >> > I really have had no problems with them.

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >I have higher standards.

    >
    > Do not confust biases with standards.
    >
    > > There is one thing you will get in my shop that
    > >you wont get in most others- integrity!

    >
    > Do not confuse integrity with an inflated ego.
    >
    > Your intimation that anyone who sells AMD-based systems lacks
    > integrity and is a whore is insulting and narrow-minded.
    >
    > > I will not sell a product I do
    > >not have confidence in.

    >
    > Well, how about that -- that same as most of us. But some of us DO
    > have confidence in AMD processors and systems because they have worked
    > just fine for us and our customers.
    >
    > You are entitled to your prejudices, but don't belittle everyone else
    > because they don't share in them.




    Methinks I hit a raw nerve... lol

    Fact is AMD has problems, and has had problems for many years. They have
    chosen not to fix it. This does not inspire confidence. This is not in
    dispute. Any experienced tech can tell you this. If you choose to ignore
    it, that is your decision.

    Think what you want- but your discussion sounds a bit more like sour
    grapes to me.

    I do not intimate anything about who sells AMD. I *AM* saying outright
    that if you beleive a product to be substandard and still sell it, then
    yes, you are a whore. If you honestly beleive AMD to be a good product
    (as many ppl do), then you are selling what you believe in- nothing more,
    nothing less. That fact that you responded so angrily indicates certain
    things to me though... lol

    Oh, and if you think I have belittled you- you do not know me well enough
    yet. Hang out here for a few more years and see if I actually belittle
    someone- then you will know the difference. A few still in here for all
    these years might remember a few cases where someone attracted my
    attentions.
     
    Ghost, Jul 16, 2003
    #9
  10. Terry

    Ghost Guest

    In article <>, Navin R. Johnson
    <> wrote:

    > On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 05:06:32 GMT, Terry <> wrote:
    >
    > >I just got a Gigabyte 1394 AMD Motherboard with A Thermaltake Volcano11
    > >with a Athalon 2400 XP CPU .
    > >What is the cpu temperature on the board supposed to be .
    > >I get between 148 and 150 degrees if this is running to hot for this
    > >Processor can anyone offer any suggestions?
    > >The Thermaltake is recommened for the 2400
    > >What are some other peoples view on the subject?
    > >P.S. used Artic Silver for the thermal grease!

    >
    > Even without an extra case fan, 150 is pretty damn hot. I've built five
    > or six AthlonXP 2600+ boxes using the stock AMD CPU cooler. With the
    > case closed and the room temp at around 75, the CPU's ran at 115-120
    > degrees. I have a 2600+ in my own system running in a room that's about
    > 78 degrees. Even though it's fairly dusty and hasn't been vacuumed in
    > awhile it averages 128-132 degrees. On top of that I also have three big
    > hard drives (260GB total) , a firewire card, a GF4 TI 4600 w/128MB, 1024
    > MB of DDR RAM and a CD burner all in the same system.
    >
    > To all the Intel cultists - I've been building AMD boxes since 1994 and
    > have never had a single AMD chip come back bad...... I do know what I'm
    > doing though.
    >
    > NRJ
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Very funny Scotty..... Now beam down my clothes!"


    Coincidentally, had an AMD box come in this afternoon. Would not POST.
    Went through the normal routine of trying to diagnose the problem.
    Removed all the cards, RAM, etc. No beeps at all. Other than fans and
    drives spinning up, no sign of life.

    While I had the case open, power applied, trying to POST, I began smelling
    burning. Well, at this point, there was no hope of reviving the box- I
    knew either the mobo or the CPU was dead- so i just watched to see what
    might be burning.

    Son of a gun if the damned CPU started to smoke in a very large way. The
    heatsink was hot enough to burn my fingers.

    And, it was not a high end AMD either. It was an older AMD- somewhere
    around 600 MHz or so (I do not recall which model)

    Now, I must say, this is the first time I have seen an AMD burn under
    these conditions. All fans were running fine. Heatsink was firmly
    attached.

    Would this alone be enough to swear me off of AMDs? No! But, along with
    all the other heat related issues concerning AMDs, I refuse to sell AMD
    chips.
     
    Ghost, Jul 16, 2003
    #10
  11. Terry

    Ghost Guest

    In article <>, Navin R. Johnson
    <> wrote:

    >
    > This is getting weird. Today, I went on a service call at an insurance
    > agency that had three of my AMD boxes and three previously installed
    > IntelDells. Their A/C was out all day and two of the Dells screens went
    > blank within 5 minutes of each other - both wouldn't POST. By the time I
    > got there the A/C was running again but the Dells were still dead. I did
    > the usual and pulled all the cards/drives, reseated and still no POST. I
    > then thought it would be a good idea to swap some parts between the two
    > dead machimes. First I went for the RAM and still no POST. Next I pulled
    > the CPU's, which were P4-2.4Gigs, and noticed something strange on both
    > CPUs. There was a tiny black mark between the last two letters of the
    > word MALAY that's stamped on the chips. I got out my magnifying glass
    > and lo and behold the marks really looked like tiny black craters - not
    > a good sign. I talked the customer into letting me look at the CPU in
    > the third, still running, Dell system. It was also a P4-2.4Gig chip and
    > looked normal - at least as normal as I could tell. I don't build a lot
    > of Intel boxes so I wasn't sure if that black spot was on all P-4's.
    > Long story short, I took the 'good' P4 CPU and tried it in both dead
    > systems and each one ran POST fine. Oh, and BTW, my three AthlonXP 2400+
    > boxes never burped through the whole thing.
    >
    > The customer told me that the office temp was well over 95 degrees
    > before the A/C was fixed. After my diagnosis of two bad P4s he called
    > Dell - the systems were still under extended warranty. We both had to
    > fight with the Dell tekkie to finally get him to agree to send us two
    > new CPUs - we didn't mention the heat, though.
    >
    > This goes totally against the 'AMD runs hot' argument. Maybe the Dells
    > just didn't have enough air flow in their crappy cases and my AMDs did.
    > I have no idea. All I know is that I'm going back there tomorrow to
    > install two P4 chips and I'm gonna bill them for $265 for my labor.
    >
    >


    Yes, that is weird... especially since Intel P4s have some pretty strong
    thermal protection built in to every chip. I would geuss either a factory
    defect (since the saem spot in both bad chips was damaged), or is was over
    voltage rather than heat related.

    But, it is certainly possible the heat did them in. You would have to
    examine them under an electron microscope to know for sure- and that aint
    gonna happen.

    I will keep my ears open for any more stories of bad P4 chips- maybe a bad
    batch or something.
     
    Ghost, Jul 16, 2003
    #11
  12. Terry

    Lee Parsons Guest

    On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 01:02:28 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:


    >Methinks I hit a raw nerve... lol



    No, you were simply insulting and received an appropriate reply.



    >That fact that you responded so angrily indicates certain
    >things to me though... lol


    Stop trying to justify your assholic behavior, you're just digging
    yourself in deeper.

    >someone- then you will know the difference. A few still in here for all
    >these years might remember a few cases where someone attracted my
    >attentions.


    Had to throw in a threat, too? Thank you for showing us all exactly
    what kind of person you are.
     
    Lee Parsons, Jul 16, 2003
    #12
  13. Terry

    Nick Guest

    > 3M video is the main reason I always use a wrist strap and static mat
    > when I work on a system. Seeing is believing.


    People actually pick on me some times for using a wrist
    strap. It is good to know that someone else is out
    there with the "better safe than sorry" attitude.

    Cheers!
    --

    Nick
    A+, MCP
     
    Nick, Jul 16, 2003
    #13
  14. Terry

    Ghost Guest

    In article <>, Navin R. Johnson
    <> wrote:

    > On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 04:37:35 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:
    >
    > SNIP<<
    >
    > >Yes, that is weird... especially since Intel P4s have some pretty strong
    > >thermal protection built in to every chip. I would geuss either a factory
    > >defect (since the saem spot in both bad chips was damaged), or is was over
    > >voltage rather than heat related.

    >
    > Is it possible that Dell had them set up wrong? With an AMD mobo you'd
    > have to go into the BIOS and purposely set the voltages wrong. And, the
    > fact that both CPUs went within ten minutes of each other while the room
    > temp was over 95 leads me to believe it was the high temp. Shouldn't
    > there be some overheat protection built into the mobo?


    No, and in fact that is what is wrong with AMD. AMD chips have no thermal
    protection built in, and rely on a 3rd party motherboard for thermal
    protection- which usually does not protect very well.

    >
    > >But, it is certainly possible the heat did them in. You would have to
    > >examine them under an electron microscope to know for sure- and that aint
    > >gonna happen.

    >
    > Au contraire Casper. One of my oldest customers, Westinghouse, has a lab
    > with an electron microscope. I've seen it in action before and it's way
    > kewl. I'm sure Dell will want the bad chips returned but I may be able
    > to snag one for a couple of days and take it to the lab to have a look.
    > If that happens I'll get some pics and post them in one of the binaries
    > groups.


    Now THAT would be tres kewl!!!! I definitely want to see THOSE pics... lol
    >


    > Hey, I just thought of something. Back in the early eighties I went to a
    > 3M seminar that dealt with ESD and saw a video of what static
    > electricity could do to electronic components. It showed some before and
    > after shots of a component that was exposed to ESD. In the before shots
    > everything looked nice and smooth but the after shots looked like the
    > surface of the moon with little craters all over. Maybe Dell's poor
    > handling of the CPUs played a part in this problem since ESD almost
    > never causes an immediate failure. It usually just weakens a component
    > and creates hot spots which will shorten the life of the chip. BTW, that
    > 3M video is the main reason I always use a wrist strap and static mat
    > when I work on a system. Seeing is believing.


    Yes, I have seen a few microscopic pics of ESD damage.. pretty impressive
    stuff... I would love to see that video if you ever run across it...

    >
    > >I will keep my ears open for any more stories of bad P4 chips- maybe a bad
    > >batch or something.

    >
    > You keep your ears open and I'll stick with AMD. :)
    >


    lol... will do!!! lol
     
    Ghost, Jul 17, 2003
    #14
  15. Terry

    Ghost Guest

    In article <xGkRa.3383$>, Nick
    <> wrote:

    > > 3M video is the main reason I always use a wrist strap and static mat
    > > when I work on a system. Seeing is believing.

    >
    > People actually pick on me some times for using a wrist
    > strap. It is good to know that someone else is out
    > there with the "better safe than sorry" attitude.
    >
    > Cheers!


    Naw.. some of use are still out there.. We use straps whenever we handle
    CPUs, mobos, or RAM... Sometimes, if the ESD is more prevelant, we use
    the straps for everything.
     
    Ghost, Jul 17, 2003
    #15
  16. Terry

    Andrew Tang Guest

    Yes. 65 deg C is a little high. I would expect it to be 50-60. But then
    I have been told that the Athlon does not have an on-die diode as
    temperature sensor so that the number you see may be off depending on the
    positioning of the temperature sensor and the compensation used.

    "Terry" <> wrote in message
    news:sTqQa.420$...
    > I just got a Gigabyte 1394 AMD Motherboard with A Thermaltake Volcano11
    > with a Athalon 2400 XP CPU .
    > What is the cpu temperature on the board supposed to be .
    > I get between 148 and 150 degrees if this is running to hot for this
    > Processor can anyone offer any suggestions?
    > The Thermaltake is recommened for the 2400
    > What are some other peoples view on the subject?
    > P.S. used Artic Silver for the thermal grease!
    >
     
    Andrew Tang, Jul 17, 2003
    #16
  17. Terry

    Andrew Tang Guest

    Yes. 65 deg C is a little high. I would expect it to be 50-60. But then
    I have been told that the Athlon does not have an on-die diode as
    temperature sensor so that the number you see may be off depending on the
    positioning of the temperature sensor and the compensation used.

    "Terry" <> wrote in message
    news:sTqQa.420$...
    > I just got a Gigabyte 1394 AMD Motherboard with A Thermaltake Volcano11
    > with a Athalon 2400 XP CPU .
    > What is the cpu temperature on the board supposed to be .
    > I get between 148 and 150 degrees if this is running to hot for this
    > Processor can anyone offer any suggestions?
    > The Thermaltake is recommened for the 2400
    > What are some other peoples view on the subject?
    > P.S. used Artic Silver for the thermal grease!
    >
     
    Andrew Tang, Jul 17, 2003
    #17
  18. You are not measuring the CPU die temperature, there is NO CPU chip that
    runs anywhere near that cool (that is in the mid 90's).


    Bret wrote:

    > On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 23:25:17 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:
    >
    >
    >>In article <sTqQa.420$>, Terry
    >><> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I just got a Gigabyte 1394 AMD Motherboard with A Thermaltake Volcano11
    >>>with a Athalon 2400 XP CPU .
    >>>What is the cpu temperature on the board supposed to be .
    >>>I get between 148 and 150 degrees if this is running to hot for this
    >>>Processor can anyone offer any suggestions?
    >>>The Thermaltake is recommened for the 2400
    >>>What are some other peoples view on the subject?
    >>>P.S. used Artic Silver for the thermal grease!

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>The simple answer is you should not have gotten an AMD... they have
    >>historically been very bad as far as heat goes...
    >>
    >>However, since you already have it, you have to cool it as much as you
    >>can. A heatsink the size of Rhode Island comes to mind... lol
    >>Seriously, get a very large heatsink, and several fans.
    >>
    >>Oh, and no arguments from the peanut gallery out there, OK??? AMD is a
    >>very hot chip. If you lose a heatsink or cooling fans, you could easily
    >>burn the chip and/or the mobo. This is not an opinion. It is absolute
    >>fact. Any tech who has been around the block and verify this. Yes, AMD
    >>is fast and AMD is cheap, but you get what you pay for. Heat is an issue
    >>with AMDs.

    >
    >
    > I'm running a 2400XP in a GA7VAXP ultra with a standard AMD supplied
    > heatsink and fan, temperature varies beetween 36 and 38 degrees C.
    > I don't consider it hot, what temp does your Intel run at?
     
    Barry Watzman, Jul 17, 2003
    #18
  19. Terry

    Bret Guest

    On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 04:17:52 GMT, Barry Watzman <>
    wrote:

    >You are not measuring the CPU die temperature, there is NO CPU chip that
    >runs anywhere near that cool (that is in the mid 90's).


    How do you want me to measure the temperature Barry?
    I use the easytune utility provided by Gigabyte, currently reading 42
    degrees C with seti command line client running.
     
    Bret, Jul 17, 2003
    #19
  20. Terry

    Andrew Tang Guest

    Yes. 65 deg C is a little high. I would expect it to be 50-60. But then
    I have been told that the Athlon does not have an on-die diode as
    temperature sensor so that the number you see may be off depending on the
    positioning of the temperature sensor and the compensation used.

    "Terry" <> wrote in message
    news:sTqQa.420$...
    > I just got a Gigabyte 1394 AMD Motherboard with A Thermaltake Volcano11
    > with a Athalon 2400 XP CPU .
    > What is the cpu temperature on the board supposed to be .
    > I get between 148 and 150 degrees if this is running to hot for this
    > Processor can anyone offer any suggestions?
    > The Thermaltake is recommened for the 2400
    > What are some other peoples view on the subject?
    > P.S. used Artic Silver for the thermal grease!
    >
     
    Andrew Tang, Jul 17, 2003
    #20
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