CPU/Motherboard Upgrade

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Jim Henriksen, Mar 12, 2008.

  1. I have been running XP-64 for two years. It is far and away the best
    version of Windows I have used. It's rock solid and responsive.

    I'd like to upgrade to a dual-core CPU and new motherboard, but I have
    tons of software installed on my current machine, and I don't want to
    spend three days upgrading. What's the quickest and safest way to do
    so? I could just rebuild my system, including the current hard drive
    as-is, turn on the power and hope for the best. How capable is XP-64
    when it comes to on-the-fly changes of CPUs and associated drivers, etc?
    Jim Henriksen, Mar 12, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. You will need to do a repair install to avoid having to reinstall your apps.
    Sometimes a repair install does not work so back up everything first. You
    will need a cd that is at the same service pack level as the installed OS so
    if you are at SP2 on the hard drive make sure you have an XP Pro x64 cd with
    SP2 integrated. You can make one by slipstreaming with nLite.
    http://www.nliteos.com/guide/

    "Jim Henriksen" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    >I have been running XP-64 for two years. It is far and away the best
    >version of Windows I have used. It's rock solid and responsive.
    >
    > I'd like to upgrade to a dual-core CPU and new motherboard, but I have
    > tons of software installed on my current machine, and I don't want to
    > spend three days upgrading. What's the quickest and safest way to do so?
    > I could just rebuild my system, including the current hard drive as-is,
    > turn on the power and hope for the best. How capable is XP-64 when it
    > comes to on-the-fly changes of CPUs and associated drivers, etc?
    Colin Barnhorst, Mar 12, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Jim Henriksen

    Bill Patten Guest

    Jim,

    You might also look at Acronis Echo Workstation with universal restore.
    http://www.acronis.com/enterprise/products/ATICW/
    It's about $100 but could be work it. Create an image of your existing
    system and restore to the new system. No risk to your old system and pretty
    straight forward. You can down load a demo, but I do not know how much of
    this you can do with the demo.

    I use Acronis Home , 9 10 and 11 but have not used Echo and no I am not
    associated with them...

    Bill


    "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    You will need to do a repair install to avoid having to reinstall your apps.
    Sometimes a repair install does not work so back up everything first. You
    will need a cd that is at the same service pack level as the installed OS so
    if you are at SP2 on the hard drive make sure you have an XP Pro x64 cd with
    SP2 integrated. You can make one by slipstreaming with nLite.
    http://www.nliteos.com/guide/

    "Jim Henriksen" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    >I have been running XP-64 for two years. It is far and away the best
    >version of Windows I have used. It's rock solid and responsive.
    >
    > I'd like to upgrade to a dual-core CPU and new motherboard, but I have
    > tons of software installed on my current machine, and I don't want to
    > spend three days upgrading. What's the quickest and safest way to do so?
    > I could just rebuild my system, including the current hard drive as-is,
    > turn on the power and hope for the best. How capable is XP-64 when it
    > comes to on-the-fly changes of CPUs and associated drivers, etc?
    Bill Patten, Mar 12, 2008
    #3
  4. As Colin suggests, an inplace "repair install" is your best bet. But, _IF_
    your new mobo and your old one are similar, (chipsets and such the same),
    you _might_ get away with just replacing it and powering on. But honestly,
    I'd be well prepared to have to do a repair install.

    The one thing you don't have to worry about is moving from a single core to
    a dual core. All x64 versions of Windows use a multi-processor kernel, so
    you already have support for the second core.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel


    "Jim Henriksen" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    >I have been running XP-64 for two years. It is far and away the best
    >version of Windows I have used. It's rock solid and responsive.
    >
    > I'd like to upgrade to a dual-core CPU and new motherboard, but I have
    > tons of software installed on my current machine, and I don't want to
    > spend three days upgrading. What's the quickest and safest way to do so?
    > I could just rebuild my system, including the current hard drive as-is,
    > turn on the power and hope for the best. How capable is XP-64 when it
    > comes to on-the-fly changes of CPUs and associated drivers, etc?
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Mar 13, 2008
    #4
  5. Jim Henriksen

    Bill Guest

    Does the OEM license allow you to transfer x64 in this manner. It is my
    understanding this is not allowed as the license is tied to the original
    machine and the only time this is allowed is if replacing a defective MB
    and/or CPU. Just a thought, not intended as a don't do it.

    BullDawg

    "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > As Colin suggests, an inplace "repair install" is your best bet. But, _IF_
    > your new mobo and your old one are similar, (chipsets and such the same),
    > you _might_ get away with just replacing it and powering on. But honestly,
    > I'd be well prepared to have to do a repair install.
    >
    > The one thing you don't have to worry about is moving from a single core
    > to a dual core. All x64 versions of Windows use a multi-processor kernel,
    > so you already have support for the second core.
    >
    > --
    > Charlie.
    > http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >
    >
    > "Jim Henriksen" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >>I have been running XP-64 for two years. It is far and away the best
    >>version of Windows I have used. It's rock solid and responsive.
    >>
    >> I'd like to upgrade to a dual-core CPU and new motherboard, but I have
    >> tons of software installed on my current machine, and I don't want to
    >> spend three days upgrading. What's the quickest and safest way to do so?
    >> I could just rebuild my system, including the current hard drive as-is,
    >> turn on the power and hope for the best. How capable is XP-64 when it
    >> comes to on-the-fly changes of CPUs and associated drivers, etc?

    >
    Bill, Mar 15, 2008
    #5
  6. Jim Henriksen

    Theo Guest

    If you read your EULA you will know for sure. My Win XP x64
    EULA actually states I can install it 10 times. I assume
    that means only one motherboard/system at a time, but I have
    upgraded my system and not had any hassles about
    re-activating it.

    Type 'winver' in the Run box or at a Command Prompt and then
    click on the link for the EULA Agreement.

    Windows XP OEM EULA is different than the regular XP Home &
    Pro OEM EULA.


    Bill wrote:
    > Does the OEM license allow you to transfer x64 in this manner. It is my
    > understanding this is not allowed as the license is tied to the original
    > machine and the only time this is allowed is if replacing a defective MB
    > and/or CPU. Just a thought, not intended as a don't do it.
    >
    > BullDawg
    >
    > "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> As Colin suggests, an inplace "repair install" is your best bet. But, _IF_
    >> your new mobo and your old one are similar, (chipsets and such the same),
    >> you _might_ get away with just replacing it and powering on. But honestly,
    >> I'd be well prepared to have to do a repair install.
    >>
    >> The one thing you don't have to worry about is moving from a single core
    >> to a dual core. All x64 versions of Windows use a multi-processor kernel,
    >> so you already have support for the second core.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Charlie.
    >> http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    >> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>
    >>
    >> "Jim Henriksen" <> wrote in message
    >> news:%...
    >>> I have been running XP-64 for two years. It is far and away the best
    >>> version of Windows I have used. It's rock solid and responsive.
    >>>
    >>> I'd like to upgrade to a dual-core CPU and new motherboard, but I have
    >>> tons of software installed on my current machine, and I don't want to
    >>> spend three days upgrading. What's the quickest and safest way to do so?
    >>> I could just rebuild my system, including the current hard drive as-is,
    >>> turn on the power and hope for the best. How capable is XP-64 when it
    >>> comes to on-the-fly changes of CPUs and associated drivers, etc?

    >
    >
    Theo, Mar 15, 2008
    #6
  7. The XP Pro x64 Eula is not a typical OEM EULA that prohibits transfer to
    another device. The XP64 EULA permits internal transfers and one external,
    whatever "internal" and "external" mean. XP64 was released as a system
    builder edition because of device driver issues but the intent does not
    appear the same as with the 32bit OEM editions. Both the tranfer and
    support issues are different. You cannot rely on labels like "OEM" to
    determine what a license permits. You must read the EULA for the product
    yourself.

    "Bill" <eschol@remove_this.shinbiro.com> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Does the OEM license allow you to transfer x64 in this manner. It is my
    > understanding this is not allowed as the license is tied to the original
    > machine and the only time this is allowed is if replacing a defective MB
    > and/or CPU. Just a thought, not intended as a don't do it.
    >
    > BullDawg
    >
    > "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> As Colin suggests, an inplace "repair install" is your best bet. But,
    >> _IF_ your new mobo and your old one are similar, (chipsets and such the
    >> same), you _might_ get away with just replacing it and powering on. But
    >> honestly, I'd be well prepared to have to do a repair install.
    >>
    >> The one thing you don't have to worry about is moving from a single core
    >> to a dual core. All x64 versions of Windows use a multi-processor kernel,
    >> so you already have support for the second core.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Charlie.
    >> http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    >> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>
    >>
    >> "Jim Henriksen" <> wrote in message
    >> news:%...
    >>>I have been running XP-64 for two years. It is far and away the best
    >>>version of Windows I have used. It's rock solid and responsive.
    >>>
    >>> I'd like to upgrade to a dual-core CPU and new motherboard, but I have
    >>> tons of software installed on my current machine, and I don't want to
    >>> spend three days upgrading. What's the quickest and safest way to do
    >>> so? I could just rebuild my system, including the current hard drive
    >>> as-is, turn on the power and hope for the best. How capable is XP-64
    >>> when it comes to on-the-fly changes of CPUs and associated drivers, etc?

    >>

    >
    >
    Colin Barnhorst, Mar 15, 2008
    #7
  8. Jim Henriksen

    John Barnes Guest

    Yours may not be, but paragraph 1.2 on my XP64 specifically prohibits
    transfer except as part of a computer transfer.

    "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The XP Pro x64 Eula is not a typical OEM EULA that prohibits transfer to
    > another device. The XP64 EULA permits internal transfers and one
    > external, whatever "internal" and "external" mean. XP64 was released as a
    > system builder edition because of device driver issues but the intent does
    > not appear the same as with the 32bit OEM editions. Both the tranfer and
    > support issues are different. You cannot rely on labels like "OEM" to
    > determine what a license permits. You must read the EULA for the product
    > yourself.
    >
    > "Bill" <eschol@remove_this.shinbiro.com> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> Does the OEM license allow you to transfer x64 in this manner. It is my
    >> understanding this is not allowed as the license is tied to the original
    >> machine and the only time this is allowed is if replacing a defective MB
    >> and/or CPU. Just a thought, not intended as a don't do it.
    >>
    >> BullDawg
    >>
    >> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> As Colin suggests, an inplace "repair install" is your best bet. But,
    >>> _IF_ your new mobo and your old one are similar, (chipsets and such the
    >>> same), you _might_ get away with just replacing it and powering on. But
    >>> honestly, I'd be well prepared to have to do a repair install.
    >>>
    >>> The one thing you don't have to worry about is moving from a single core
    >>> to a dual core. All x64 versions of Windows use a multi-processor
    >>> kernel, so you already have support for the second core.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Charlie.
    >>> http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    >>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Jim Henriksen" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:%...
    >>>>I have been running XP-64 for two years. It is far and away the best
    >>>>version of Windows I have used. It's rock solid and responsive.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'd like to upgrade to a dual-core CPU and new motherboard, but I have
    >>>> tons of software installed on my current machine, and I don't want to
    >>>> spend three days upgrading. What's the quickest and safest way to do
    >>>> so? I could just rebuild my system, including the current hard drive
    >>>> as-is, turn on the power and hope for the best. How capable is XP-64
    >>>> when it comes to on-the-fly changes of CPUs and associated drivers,
    >>>> etc?
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    John Barnes, Mar 15, 2008
    #8
  9. Sorry, John, but the EULA for XP Pro x64 (on
    http://www.microsoft.com/about/legal/useterms/default.aspx)
    states in section 4,

    "4. TRANSFER-Internal. You may move the Product to a different Workstation
    Computer. After the transfer, you
    must completely remove the Product from the former Workstation Computer.
    Transfer to Third Party. The initial
    user of the Product may make a one-time transfer of the Product to another
    end user. The transfer has to include
    all component parts, media, printed materials, this EULA, and if applicable,
    the Certificate of Authenticity. The
    transfer may not be an indirect transfer, such as a consignment. Prior to
    the transfer, the end user receiving the
    transferred Product must agree to all the EULA terms. No Rental. You may not
    rent, lease, lend or provide
    commercial hosting services to third parties with the Product."

    If you are quoting from a EULA on your cd it may have been superceded. It
    may also matter if you are reading from an XP Pro x64 rtm or SP2 EULA since
    EULAs do get updated at service pack releases if needed.

    In any case, it is clear that a user is entitled to transfer XP Pro x64 to a
    new computer.

    "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Yours may not be, but paragraph 1.2 on my XP64 specifically prohibits
    > transfer except as part of a computer transfer.
    >
    > "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> The XP Pro x64 Eula is not a typical OEM EULA that prohibits transfer to
    >> another device. The XP64 EULA permits internal transfers and one
    >> external, whatever "internal" and "external" mean. XP64 was released as
    >> a system builder edition because of device driver issues but the intent
    >> does not appear the same as with the 32bit OEM editions. Both the
    >> tranfer and support issues are different. You cannot rely on labels like
    >> "OEM" to determine what a license permits. You must read the EULA for
    >> the product yourself.
    >>
    >> "Bill" <eschol@remove_this.shinbiro.com> wrote in message
    >> news:%...
    >>> Does the OEM license allow you to transfer x64 in this manner. It is my
    >>> understanding this is not allowed as the license is tied to the original
    >>> machine and the only time this is allowed is if replacing a defective MB
    >>> and/or CPU. Just a thought, not intended as a don't do it.
    >>>
    >>> BullDawg
    >>>
    >>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>> message news:...
    >>>> As Colin suggests, an inplace "repair install" is your best bet. But,
    >>>> _IF_ your new mobo and your old one are similar, (chipsets and such the
    >>>> same), you _might_ get away with just replacing it and powering on. But
    >>>> honestly, I'd be well prepared to have to do a repair install.
    >>>>
    >>>> The one thing you don't have to worry about is moving from a single
    >>>> core to a dual core. All x64 versions of Windows use a multi-processor
    >>>> kernel, so you already have support for the second core.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Charlie.
    >>>> http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    >>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Jim Henriksen" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:%...
    >>>>>I have been running XP-64 for two years. It is far and away the best
    >>>>>version of Windows I have used. It's rock solid and responsive.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I'd like to upgrade to a dual-core CPU and new motherboard, but I have
    >>>>> tons of software installed on my current machine, and I don't want to
    >>>>> spend three days upgrading. What's the quickest and safest way to do
    >>>>> so? I could just rebuild my system, including the current hard drive
    >>>>> as-is, turn on the power and hope for the best. How capable is XP-64
    >>>>> when it comes to on-the-fly changes of CPUs and associated drivers,
    >>>>> etc?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
    Colin Barnhorst, Mar 15, 2008
    #9
  10. Jim Henriksen

    John Barnes Guest

    I'm looking at the eula that installed with my copy of XP X64
    OEM

    1.2 SOFTWARE as a Component of the COMPUTER
    - Transfer. This license may not be shared,
    transferred to or used concurrently on
    different computers. The SOFTWARE is licensed
    with the COMPUTER as a single integrated
    product and may only be used with the
    COMPUTER. If the SOFTWARE is not accompanied
    by HARDWARE, you may not use the SOFTWARE.
    You may permanently transfer all of your
    rights under this EULA only as part of a
    permanent sale or transfer of the COMPUTER,
    provided you retain no copies of the SOFTWARE.
    If the SOFTWARE is an upgrade, any transfer
    must also include all prior versions of the
    SOFTWARE. This transfer must also include the
    Certificate of Authenticity label. The
    transfer may not be an indirect transfer,
    such as a consignment. Prior to the transfer,
    the end user receiving the Software must
    agree to all the EULA terms.

    Section 4 of my EULA

    4. LIMITATIONS ON REVERSE ENGINEERING,
    DECOMPILATION, AND DISASSEMBLY. You may not
    reverse engineer, decompile, or disassemble
    the Software, except and only to the extent
    that such activity is expressly permitted by
    applicable law notwithstanding this
    limitation.

    "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Sorry, John, but the EULA for XP Pro x64 (on
    > http://www.microsoft.com/about/legal/useterms/default.aspx)
    > states in section 4,
    >
    > "4. TRANSFER-Internal. You may move the Product to a different Workstation
    > Computer. After the transfer, you
    > must completely remove the Product from the former Workstation Computer.
    > Transfer to Third Party. The initial
    > user of the Product may make a one-time transfer of the Product to another
    > end user. The transfer has to include
    > all component parts, media, printed materials, this EULA, and if
    > applicable, the Certificate of Authenticity. The
    > transfer may not be an indirect transfer, such as a consignment. Prior to
    > the transfer, the end user receiving the
    > transferred Product must agree to all the EULA terms. No Rental. You may
    > not rent, lease, lend or provide
    > commercial hosting services to third parties with the Product."
    >
    > If you are quoting from a EULA on your cd it may have been superceded. It
    > may also matter if you are reading from an XP Pro x64 rtm or SP2 EULA
    > since EULAs do get updated at service pack releases if needed.
    >
    > In any case, it is clear that a user is entitled to transfer XP Pro x64 to
    > a new computer.
    >
    > "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Yours may not be, but paragraph 1.2 on my XP64 specifically prohibits
    >> transfer except as part of a computer transfer.
    >>
    >> "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> The XP Pro x64 Eula is not a typical OEM EULA that prohibits transfer to
    >>> another device. The XP64 EULA permits internal transfers and one
    >>> external, whatever "internal" and "external" mean. XP64 was released as
    >>> a system builder edition because of device driver issues but the intent
    >>> does not appear the same as with the 32bit OEM editions. Both the
    >>> tranfer and support issues are different. You cannot rely on labels
    >>> like "OEM" to determine what a license permits. You must read the EULA
    >>> for the product yourself.
    >>>
    >>> "Bill" <eschol@remove_this.shinbiro.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:%...
    >>>> Does the OEM license allow you to transfer x64 in this manner. It is
    >>>> my understanding this is not allowed as the license is tied to the
    >>>> original machine and the only time this is allowed is if replacing a
    >>>> defective MB and/or CPU. Just a thought, not intended as a don't do
    >>>> it.
    >>>>
    >>>> BullDawg
    >>>>
    >>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>> message news:...
    >>>>> As Colin suggests, an inplace "repair install" is your best bet. But,
    >>>>> _IF_ your new mobo and your old one are similar, (chipsets and such
    >>>>> the same), you _might_ get away with just replacing it and powering
    >>>>> on. But honestly, I'd be well prepared to have to do a repair install.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The one thing you don't have to worry about is moving from a single
    >>>>> core to a dual core. All x64 versions of Windows use a multi-processor
    >>>>> kernel, so you already have support for the second core.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>> http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    >>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Jim Henriksen" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:%...
    >>>>>>I have been running XP-64 for two years. It is far and away the best
    >>>>>>version of Windows I have used. It's rock solid and responsive.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I'd like to upgrade to a dual-core CPU and new motherboard, but I
    >>>>>> have tons of software installed on my current machine, and I don't
    >>>>>> want to spend three days upgrading. What's the quickest and safest
    >>>>>> way to do so? I could just rebuild my system, including the current
    >>>>>> hard drive as-is, turn on the power and hope for the best. How
    >>>>>> capable is XP-64 when it comes to on-the-fly changes of CPUs and
    >>>>>> associated drivers, etc?
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
    John Barnes, Mar 15, 2008
    #10
  11. The system builder kits may in fact be different. Keep in mind that what
    would have been distributed through retail outlets was not in the case of
    XP64. Although MS chose the system builder distribution channel, the EULA
    is identical with XP Pro x86 retail concerning tranferrability. Make the
    comparison on the website between XP Pro x86 and XP Pro x64. I rather
    imagine that a preinstalled XP64 might not be transferrable but not all XP64
    is OEM just because there is no boxed version. It apparently is possible to
    distribute a retail license through system builder channels. A retail
    license for XP Pro x64 does exist. That is what is on the website.

    "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    news:uY%...
    > I'm looking at the eula that installed with my copy of XP X64
    > OEM
    >
    > 1.2 SOFTWARE as a Component of the COMPUTER
    > - Transfer. This license may not be shared,
    > transferred to or used concurrently on
    > different computers. The SOFTWARE is licensed
    > with the COMPUTER as a single integrated
    > product and may only be used with the
    > COMPUTER. If the SOFTWARE is not accompanied
    > by HARDWARE, you may not use the SOFTWARE.
    > You may permanently transfer all of your
    > rights under this EULA only as part of a
    > permanent sale or transfer of the COMPUTER,
    > provided you retain no copies of the SOFTWARE.
    > If the SOFTWARE is an upgrade, any transfer
    > must also include all prior versions of the
    > SOFTWARE. This transfer must also include the
    > Certificate of Authenticity label. The
    > transfer may not be an indirect transfer,
    > such as a consignment. Prior to the transfer,
    > the end user receiving the Software must
    > agree to all the EULA terms.
    >
    > Section 4 of my EULA
    >
    > 4. LIMITATIONS ON REVERSE ENGINEERING,
    > DECOMPILATION, AND DISASSEMBLY. You may not
    > reverse engineer, decompile, or disassemble
    > the Software, except and only to the extent
    > that such activity is expressly permitted by
    > applicable law notwithstanding this
    > limitation.
    >
    > "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Sorry, John, but the EULA for XP Pro x64 (on
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/about/legal/useterms/default.aspx)
    >> states in section 4,
    >>
    >> "4. TRANSFER-Internal. You may move the Product to a different
    >> Workstation Computer. After the transfer, you
    >> must completely remove the Product from the former Workstation Computer.
    >> Transfer to Third Party. The initial
    >> user of the Product may make a one-time transfer of the Product to
    >> another end user. The transfer has to include
    >> all component parts, media, printed materials, this EULA, and if
    >> applicable, the Certificate of Authenticity. The
    >> transfer may not be an indirect transfer, such as a consignment. Prior to
    >> the transfer, the end user receiving the
    >> transferred Product must agree to all the EULA terms. No Rental. You may
    >> not rent, lease, lend or provide
    >> commercial hosting services to third parties with the Product."
    >>
    >> If you are quoting from a EULA on your cd it may have been superceded.
    >> It may also matter if you are reading from an XP Pro x64 rtm or SP2 EULA
    >> since EULAs do get updated at service pack releases if needed.
    >>
    >> In any case, it is clear that a user is entitled to transfer XP Pro x64
    >> to a new computer.
    >>
    >> "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Yours may not be, but paragraph 1.2 on my XP64 specifically prohibits
    >>> transfer except as part of a computer transfer.
    >>>
    >>> "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> The XP Pro x64 Eula is not a typical OEM EULA that prohibits transfer
    >>>> to another device. The XP64 EULA permits internal transfers and one
    >>>> external, whatever "internal" and "external" mean. XP64 was released
    >>>> as a system builder edition because of device driver issues but the
    >>>> intent does not appear the same as with the 32bit OEM editions. Both
    >>>> the tranfer and support issues are different. You cannot rely on
    >>>> labels like "OEM" to determine what a license permits. You must read
    >>>> the EULA for the product yourself.
    >>>>
    >>>> "Bill" <eschol@remove_this.shinbiro.com> wrote in message
    >>>> news:%...
    >>>>> Does the OEM license allow you to transfer x64 in this manner. It is
    >>>>> my understanding this is not allowed as the license is tied to the
    >>>>> original machine and the only time this is allowed is if replacing a
    >>>>> defective MB and/or CPU. Just a thought, not intended as a don't do
    >>>>> it.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> BullDawg
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>>> message news:...
    >>>>>> As Colin suggests, an inplace "repair install" is your best bet. But,
    >>>>>> _IF_ your new mobo and your old one are similar, (chipsets and such
    >>>>>> the same), you _might_ get away with just replacing it and powering
    >>>>>> on. But honestly, I'd be well prepared to have to do a repair
    >>>>>> install.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The one thing you don't have to worry about is moving from a single
    >>>>>> core to a dual core. All x64 versions of Windows use a
    >>>>>> multi-processor kernel, so you already have support for the second
    >>>>>> core.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> --
    >>>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>>> http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    >>>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "Jim Henriksen" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:%...
    >>>>>>>I have been running XP-64 for two years. It is far and away the best
    >>>>>>>version of Windows I have used. It's rock solid and responsive.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I'd like to upgrade to a dual-core CPU and new motherboard, but I
    >>>>>>> have tons of software installed on my current machine, and I don't
    >>>>>>> want to spend three days upgrading. What's the quickest and safest
    >>>>>>> way to do so? I could just rebuild my system, including the current
    >>>>>>> hard drive as-is, turn on the power and hope for the best. How
    >>>>>>> capable is XP-64 when it comes to on-the-fly changes of CPUs and
    >>>>>>> associated drivers, etc?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
    Colin Barnhorst, Mar 15, 2008
    #11
  12. To everyone who has responded to my original post.

    Thanks for your advice.

    Whether I'm moving to a new computer is an interesting legal question.
    I'll be using the same box, the same hard drive, the same network, and
    all of the same devices. In simplistic terms, the mobo/CPU/memory
    upgrade is similar to replacing my car's engine. It's still the same
    car. Of course, lawyers never think simplistically, even though some of
    them are simple-minded.

    My new mobo/CPU/memory has been shipped, so I'll let you all know how
    things went by the end of next week. For what it's worth, I ordered my
    stuff from TigerDirect. I've had good experience with them in the past:
    good prices and prompt delivery of the right stuff.

    Regards,
    Jim
    Jim Henriksen, Mar 15, 2008
    #12
  13. Jim Henriksen

    John Barnes Guest

    I am not familiar with a retail version of XP64. Running WinVer links to
    the EULA that arrived with my product, labeled 'This OEM software ...' and
    was purchased from Directron on the first day it was available May 5, 2005.
    Your EULA is dated 2001 and the terms are similar to those on the beta
    version Eula I received.
    Enough from this end, you get the last word.

    "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The system builder kits may in fact be different. Keep in mind that what
    > would have been distributed through retail outlets was not in the case of
    > XP64. Although MS chose the system builder distribution channel, the EULA
    > is identical with XP Pro x86 retail concerning tranferrability. Make the
    > comparison on the website between XP Pro x86 and XP Pro x64. I rather
    > imagine that a preinstalled XP64 might not be transferrable but not all
    > XP64 is OEM just because there is no boxed version. It apparently is
    > possible to distribute a retail license through system builder channels.
    > A retail license for XP Pro x64 does exist. That is what is on the
    > website.
    >
    > "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    > news:uY%...
    >> I'm looking at the eula that installed with my copy of XP X64
    >> OEM
    >>
    >> 1.2 SOFTWARE as a Component of the COMPUTER
    >> - Transfer. This license may not be shared,
    >> transferred to or used concurrently on
    >> different computers. The SOFTWARE is licensed
    >> with the COMPUTER as a single integrated
    >> product and may only be used with the
    >> COMPUTER. If the SOFTWARE is not accompanied
    >> by HARDWARE, you may not use the SOFTWARE.
    >> You may permanently transfer all of your
    >> rights under this EULA only as part of a
    >> permanent sale or transfer of the COMPUTER,
    >> provided you retain no copies of the SOFTWARE.
    >> If the SOFTWARE is an upgrade, any transfer
    >> must also include all prior versions of the
    >> SOFTWARE. This transfer must also include the
    >> Certificate of Authenticity label. The
    >> transfer may not be an indirect transfer,
    >> such as a consignment. Prior to the transfer,
    >> the end user receiving the Software must
    >> agree to all the EULA terms.
    >>
    >> Section 4 of my EULA
    >>
    >> 4. LIMITATIONS ON REVERSE ENGINEERING,
    >> DECOMPILATION, AND DISASSEMBLY. You may not
    >> reverse engineer, decompile, or disassemble
    >> the Software, except and only to the extent
    >> that such activity is expressly permitted by
    >> applicable law notwithstanding this
    >> limitation.
    >>
    >> "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Sorry, John, but the EULA for XP Pro x64 (on
    >>> http://www.microsoft.com/about/legal/useterms/default.aspx)
    >>> states in section 4,
    >>>
    >>> "4. TRANSFER-Internal. You may move the Product to a different
    >>> Workstation Computer. After the transfer, you
    >>> must completely remove the Product from the former Workstation Computer.
    >>> Transfer to Third Party. The initial
    >>> user of the Product may make a one-time transfer of the Product to
    >>> another end user. The transfer has to include
    >>> all component parts, media, printed materials, this EULA, and if
    >>> applicable, the Certificate of Authenticity. The
    >>> transfer may not be an indirect transfer, such as a consignment. Prior
    >>> to the transfer, the end user receiving the
    >>> transferred Product must agree to all the EULA terms. No Rental. You may
    >>> not rent, lease, lend or provide
    >>> commercial hosting services to third parties with the Product."
    >>>
    >>> If you are quoting from a EULA on your cd it may have been superceded.
    >>> It may also matter if you are reading from an XP Pro x64 rtm or SP2 EULA
    >>> since EULAs do get updated at service pack releases if needed.
    >>>
    >>> In any case, it is clear that a user is entitled to transfer XP Pro x64
    >>> to a new computer.
    >>>
    >>> "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Yours may not be, but paragraph 1.2 on my XP64 specifically prohibits
    >>>> transfer except as part of a computer transfer.
    >>>>
    >>>> "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> The XP Pro x64 Eula is not a typical OEM EULA that prohibits transfer
    >>>>> to another device. The XP64 EULA permits internal transfers and one
    >>>>> external, whatever "internal" and "external" mean. XP64 was released
    >>>>> as a system builder edition because of device driver issues but the
    >>>>> intent does not appear the same as with the 32bit OEM editions. Both
    >>>>> the tranfer and support issues are different. You cannot rely on
    >>>>> labels like "OEM" to determine what a license permits. You must read
    >>>>> the EULA for the product yourself.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Bill" <eschol@remove_this.shinbiro.com> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:%...
    >>>>>> Does the OEM license allow you to transfer x64 in this manner. It is
    >>>>>> my understanding this is not allowed as the license is tied to the
    >>>>>> original machine and the only time this is allowed is if replacing a
    >>>>>> defective MB and/or CPU. Just a thought, not intended as a don't do
    >>>>>> it.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> BullDawg
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>>>> message news:...
    >>>>>>> As Colin suggests, an inplace "repair install" is your best bet.
    >>>>>>> But, _IF_ your new mobo and your old one are similar, (chipsets and
    >>>>>>> such the same), you _might_ get away with just replacing it and
    >>>>>>> powering on. But honestly, I'd be well prepared to have to do a
    >>>>>>> repair install.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> The one thing you don't have to worry about is moving from a single
    >>>>>>> core to a dual core. All x64 versions of Windows use a
    >>>>>>> multi-processor kernel, so you already have support for the second
    >>>>>>> core.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>>>> http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    >>>>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> "Jim Henriksen" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>> news:%...
    >>>>>>>>I have been running XP-64 for two years. It is far and away the
    >>>>>>>>best version of Windows I have used. It's rock solid and
    >>>>>>>>responsive.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I'd like to upgrade to a dual-core CPU and new motherboard, but I
    >>>>>>>> have tons of software installed on my current machine, and I don't
    >>>>>>>> want to spend three days upgrading. What's the quickest and safest
    >>>>>>>> way to do so? I could just rebuild my system, including the current
    >>>>>>>> hard drive as-is, turn on the power and hope for the best. How
    >>>>>>>> capable is XP-64 when it comes to on-the-fly changes of CPUs and
    >>>>>>>> associated drivers, etc?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
    John Barnes, Mar 15, 2008
    #13
  14. Just to clarify where I am with the EULA on my XP Pro x64 system, here are
    the texts from the EULA.TXT files on the cds I am using. The first is from
    the XP Pro x64 SP2 integrated cd. The second is from the original cd.
    There has not been a change since rtm. The EULA.TXT file is in the AMD64
    folder.

    From slipstreamed cd

    14. SOFTWARE TRANSFER. Internal. You may
    move the Software to a different Workstation
    Computer. After the transfer, you must
    completely remove the Software from the
    former Workstation Computer. Transfer to
    Third Party. The initial user of the Software
    may make a one-time permanent transfer of
    this EULA and Software to another end user,
    provided the initial user retains no copies
    of the Software. This transfer must include
    the Software and the Proof of License label.
    The transfer may not be an indirect transfer,
    such as a consignment. Prior to the transfer,
    the end user receiving the Software must
    agree to all the EULA terms.

    From rtm cd

    14. SOFTWARE TRANSFER. Internal. You may
    move the Software to a different Workstation
    Computer. After the transfer, you must
    completely remove the Software from the
    former Workstation Computer. Transfer to
    Third Party. The initial user of the Software
    may make a one-time permanent transfer of
    this EULA and Software to another end user,
    provided the initial user retains no copies
    of the Software. This transfer must include
    the Software and the Proof of License label.
    The transfer may not be an indirect transfer,
    such as a consignment. Prior to the transfer,
    the end user receiving the Software must
    agree to all the EULA terms.


    "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    news:uY%...
    > I'm looking at the eula that installed with my copy of XP X64
    > OEM
    >
    > 1.2 SOFTWARE as a Component of the COMPUTER
    > - Transfer. This license may not be shared,
    > transferred to or used concurrently on
    > different computers. The SOFTWARE is licensed
    > with the COMPUTER as a single integrated
    > product and may only be used with the
    > COMPUTER. If the SOFTWARE is not accompanied
    > by HARDWARE, you may not use the SOFTWARE.
    > You may permanently transfer all of your
    > rights under this EULA only as part of a
    > permanent sale or transfer of the COMPUTER,
    > provided you retain no copies of the SOFTWARE.
    > If the SOFTWARE is an upgrade, any transfer
    > must also include all prior versions of the
    > SOFTWARE. This transfer must also include the
    > Certificate of Authenticity label. The
    > transfer may not be an indirect transfer,
    > such as a consignment. Prior to the transfer,
    > the end user receiving the Software must
    > agree to all the EULA terms.
    >
    > Section 4 of my EULA
    >
    > 4. LIMITATIONS ON REVERSE ENGINEERING,
    > DECOMPILATION, AND DISASSEMBLY. You may not
    > reverse engineer, decompile, or disassemble
    > the Software, except and only to the extent
    > that such activity is expressly permitted by
    > applicable law notwithstanding this
    > limitation.
    >
    > "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Sorry, John, but the EULA for XP Pro x64 (on
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/about/legal/useterms/default.aspx)
    >> states in section 4,
    >>
    >> "4. TRANSFER-Internal. You may move the Product to a different
    >> Workstation Computer. After the transfer, you
    >> must completely remove the Product from the former Workstation Computer.
    >> Transfer to Third Party. The initial
    >> user of the Product may make a one-time transfer of the Product to
    >> another end user. The transfer has to include
    >> all component parts, media, printed materials, this EULA, and if
    >> applicable, the Certificate of Authenticity. The
    >> transfer may not be an indirect transfer, such as a consignment. Prior to
    >> the transfer, the end user receiving the
    >> transferred Product must agree to all the EULA terms. No Rental. You may
    >> not rent, lease, lend or provide
    >> commercial hosting services to third parties with the Product."
    >>
    >> If you are quoting from a EULA on your cd it may have been superceded.
    >> It may also matter if you are reading from an XP Pro x64 rtm or SP2 EULA
    >> since EULAs do get updated at service pack releases if needed.
    >>
    >> In any case, it is clear that a user is entitled to transfer XP Pro x64
    >> to a new computer.
    >>
    >> "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Yours may not be, but paragraph 1.2 on my XP64 specifically prohibits
    >>> transfer except as part of a computer transfer.
    >>>
    >>> "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> The XP Pro x64 Eula is not a typical OEM EULA that prohibits transfer
    >>>> to another device. The XP64 EULA permits internal transfers and one
    >>>> external, whatever "internal" and "external" mean. XP64 was released
    >>>> as a system builder edition because of device driver issues but the
    >>>> intent does not appear the same as with the 32bit OEM editions. Both
    >>>> the tranfer and support issues are different. You cannot rely on
    >>>> labels like "OEM" to determine what a license permits. You must read
    >>>> the EULA for the product yourself.
    >>>>
    >>>> "Bill" <eschol@remove_this.shinbiro.com> wrote in message
    >>>> news:%...
    >>>>> Does the OEM license allow you to transfer x64 in this manner. It is
    >>>>> my understanding this is not allowed as the license is tied to the
    >>>>> original machine and the only time this is allowed is if replacing a
    >>>>> defective MB and/or CPU. Just a thought, not intended as a don't do
    >>>>> it.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> BullDawg
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>>>> message news:...
    >>>>>> As Colin suggests, an inplace "repair install" is your best bet. But,
    >>>>>> _IF_ your new mobo and your old one are similar, (chipsets and such
    >>>>>> the same), you _might_ get away with just replacing it and powering
    >>>>>> on. But honestly, I'd be well prepared to have to do a repair
    >>>>>> install.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The one thing you don't have to worry about is moving from a single
    >>>>>> core to a dual core. All x64 versions of Windows use a
    >>>>>> multi-processor kernel, so you already have support for the second
    >>>>>> core.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> --
    >>>>>> Charlie.
    >>>>>> http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    >>>>>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "Jim Henriksen" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:%...
    >>>>>>>I have been running XP-64 for two years. It is far and away the best
    >>>>>>>version of Windows I have used. It's rock solid and responsive.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I'd like to upgrade to a dual-core CPU and new motherboard, but I
    >>>>>>> have tons of software installed on my current machine, and I don't
    >>>>>>> want to spend three days upgrading. What's the quickest and safest
    >>>>>>> way to do so? I could just rebuild my system, including the current
    >>>>>>> hard drive as-is, turn on the power and hope for the best. How
    >>>>>>> capable is XP-64 when it comes to on-the-fly changes of CPUs and
    >>>>>>> associated drivers, etc?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
    Colin Barnhorst, Mar 15, 2008
    #14
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Clay

    Motherboard/cpu miss-match

    Clay, Jul 1, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    673
    Ralph Wade Phillips
    Jul 2, 2003
  2. Majesty

    Running a 266 mhz cpu on a 166 motherboard?

    Majesty, Jan 8, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    488
    Michael J. Apollyon
    Jan 9, 2004
  3. no-name
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    869
    Shel-hed
    May 30, 2004
  4. D
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    1,276
  5. sub
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    2,615
    SteveM
    Jun 26, 2006
Loading...

Share This Page