CPU fan.

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by ian field, Sep 3, 2010.

  1. ian field

    ian field Guest

    Sitting here wondering what all the fuss is about regarding CPU fans.

    The fan didn't start because it was clogged with tobacco tar, dust & fluff,
    so out it came for cleaning.

    Before putting it back together I decided to run some Slick50 PTFE oil into
    the fan bearing, so the fan is laying flat on the video card so I can keep
    it spinning and work the oil into the bearing.

    Obviously as the fan is not at this moment attached to the heatsink I keep
    putting my hand on the fins to check the temperature - its not getting any
    more than luke warm.
     
    ian field, Sep 3, 2010
    #1
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  2. ian field

    John Holmes Guest

    ian field "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:

    > Sitting here wondering what all the fuss is about regarding CPU fans.
    >
    > The fan didn't start because it was clogged with tobacco tar, dust &
    > fluff, so out it came for cleaning.
    >
    > Before putting it back together I decided to run some Slick50 PTFE oil
    > into the fan bearing, so the fan is laying flat on the video card so I
    > can keep it spinning and work the oil into the bearing.
    >
    > Obviously as the fan is not at this moment attached to the heatsink I
    > keep putting my hand on the fins to check the temperature - its not
    > getting any more than luke warm.
    >
    >
    >


    Were you watching a movie? Playing a heavy game? Video editing perhaps?

    --
    <snip>
     
    John Holmes, Sep 3, 2010
    #2
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  3. ian field

    OldGringo38 Guest

    On 9/3/2010 11:23 AM Just to please that super-ego, ian field wrote the
    following tidbit of information:
    > Sitting here wondering what all the fuss is about regarding CPU fans.
    >
    > The fan didn't start because it was clogged with tobacco tar, dust& fluff,
    > so out it came for cleaning.
    >
    > Before putting it back together I decided to run some Slick50 PTFE oil into
    > the fan bearing, so the fan is laying flat on the video card so I can keep
    > it spinning and work the oil into the bearing.
    >
    > Obviously as the fan is not at this moment attached to the heatsink I keep
    > putting my hand on the fins to check the temperature - its not getting any
    > more than luke warm.
    >
    >

    And

    --
    OldGringo38
    Just West Of Nowhere
    Enjoy Life And Live It To Its Fullest
    Support Bacteria: They're the only culture some people have.
     
    OldGringo38, Sep 3, 2010
    #3
  4. ian field

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 17:23:43 +0100, ian field wrote:

    > Sitting here wondering what all the fuss is about regarding CPU fans.
    >
    > The fan didn't start because it was clogged with tobacco tar, dust &
    > fluff, so out it came for cleaning.
    >
    > Before putting it back together I decided to run some Slick50 PTFE oil
    > into the fan bearing, so the fan is laying flat on the video card so I
    > can keep it spinning and work the oil into the bearing.
    >
    > Obviously as the fan is not at this moment attached to the heatsink I
    > keep putting my hand on the fins to check the temperature - its not
    > getting any more than luke warm.


    Under load it could draw double the wattage.



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Sep 3, 2010
    #4
  5. ian field

    ian field Guest

    "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 17:23:43 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >
    >> Sitting here wondering what all the fuss is about regarding CPU fans.
    >>
    >> The fan didn't start because it was clogged with tobacco tar, dust &
    >> fluff, so out it came for cleaning.
    >>
    >> Before putting it back together I decided to run some Slick50 PTFE oil
    >> into the fan bearing, so the fan is laying flat on the video card so I
    >> can keep it spinning and work the oil into the bearing.
    >>
    >> Obviously as the fan is not at this moment attached to the heatsink I
    >> keep putting my hand on the fins to check the temperature - its not
    >> getting any more than luke warm.

    >
    > Under load it could draw double the wattage.


    Maybe I don't work it that hard.

    When I unclipped the fan from the heatsink I found the fins packed with a
    great wad of gunge - the fan hasn't been blowing air through the fins for
    quite some time and there haven't been any of the kind of glitches I'd
    associate with an overheating CPU.
     
    ian field, Sep 3, 2010
    #5
  6. ian field

    ian field Guest

    "Mike Easter" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > ian field wrote:
    >> Sitting here wondering what all the fuss is about regarding CPU fans.
    >>
    >> The fan didn't start because it was clogged with tobacco tar, dust &
    >> fluff, so out it came for cleaning.
    >>
    >> Before putting it back together I decided to run some Slick50 PTFE oil
    >> into the fan bearing, so the fan is laying flat on the video card so I
    >> can keep it spinning and work the oil into the bearing.
    >>
    >> Obviously as the fan is not at this moment attached to the heatsink I
    >> keep putting my hand on the fins to check the temperature - its not
    >> getting any more than luke warm.

    >
    > Putting your hand on the heatsink fins is not the way to check/ accurately
    > measure/ assess/ the CPU's temperature.
    >
    > If your mobo has a cpu temp readout look at that. Also, monitor the cpu
    > temp under varying loads with a utility.
    >
    > Then later when you've put the fan back, compare the results.


    One of my PCs had temperature monitoring utils but I can't remember which
    one.

    Maybe they disappeared after a clean install/upgrade or maybe I retired that
    MOBO - can't remember which.
     
    ian field, Sep 3, 2010
    #6
  7. ian field

    Mike Easter Guest

    ian field wrote:
    > "Mike Easter"


    >> Putting your hand on the heatsink fins is not the way to check/ accurately
    >> measure/ assess/ the CPU's temperature.


    > One of my PCs had temperature monitoring utils but I can't remember which
    > one.


    Get into your mobo's setup or read your mobo manual to determine what
    information the mobo can provide.

    > Maybe they disappeared after a clean install/upgrade or maybe I retired that
    > MOBO - can't remember which.


    What is this mobo? What is this CPU?


    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Sep 3, 2010
    #7
  8. ian field

    Mike Easter Guest

    ian field wrote:

    > When I unclipped the fan from the heatsink I found the fins packed with a
    > great wad of gunge - the fan hasn't been blowing air through the fins for
    > quite some time and there haven't been any of the kind of glitches I'd
    > associate with an overheating CPU.


    Is it possible that you are confusing 'unclipping' a fan from a heatsink
    with unclipping a heatsink from a CPU?

    Is it possible that you are confusing fin 'gunge' with heat transfer
    compound?


    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Sep 3, 2010
    #8
  9. ian field

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 19:21:34 +0100, ian field wrote:

    > "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >> On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 17:23:43 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >>
    >>> Sitting here wondering what all the fuss is about regarding CPU fans.
    >>>
    >>> The fan didn't start because it was clogged with tobacco tar, dust &
    >>> fluff, so out it came for cleaning.
    >>>
    >>> Before putting it back together I decided to run some Slick50 PTFE oil
    >>> into the fan bearing, so the fan is laying flat on the video card so I
    >>> can keep it spinning and work the oil into the bearing.
    >>>
    >>> Obviously as the fan is not at this moment attached to the heatsink I
    >>> keep putting my hand on the fins to check the temperature - its not
    >>> getting any more than luke warm.

    >>
    >> Under load it could draw double the wattage.

    >
    > Maybe I don't work it that hard.
    >
    > When I unclipped the fan from the heatsink I found the fins packed with
    > a great wad of gunge - the fan hasn't been blowing air through the fins
    > for quite some time and there haven't been any of the kind of glitches
    > I'd associate with an overheating CPU.


    Most decent motherboards provide fan control for noise reduction. When I
    encode mpeg video my fan speed rises slightly as the CPU warms. At idle
    the CPU fan turns at 2000 rpm, that's less than half full speed. The
    120mm chassis fan has the same control. As the chassis temp rises the fan
    speed increases. I can set the motherboard for high performance say if I
    wanted to overclock this quad core to 4ghz. I've tried it. Both fans run
    at max RPM and the box sounds like a vacuum cleaner. I guess my point is
    that if you had fan speed control and your heat sink became clogged you
    would have noticed an increase in fan speed before it was so clogged it
    stopped the fan. Depending on how much usage the CPU gets you might get
    by with no fan at all as long as your sink device has sufficient surcase
    area. A lot of Dell computers several years ago had a towering heat sink
    with no dedicated fan, just a 120mm fan in the back.




    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Sep 3, 2010
    #9
  10. ian field

    ian field Guest

    "Mike Easter" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > ian field wrote:
    >
    >> When I unclipped the fan from the heatsink I found the fins packed with a
    >> great wad of gunge - the fan hasn't been blowing air through the fins for
    >> quite some time and there haven't been any of the kind of glitches I'd
    >> associate with an overheating CPU.

    >
    > Is it possible that you are confusing 'unclipping' a fan from a heatsink
    > with unclipping a heatsink from a CPU?
    >
    > Is it possible that you are confusing fin 'gunge' with heat transfer
    > compound?



    You seem to be rather confused (apparently not difficult!).

    The silver loaded heatsink transfer compound I use isn't cheap and isn't
    easy to mistake for gunge that collects in the fan (although I can't speak
    for your inability to tell the difference).

    Also, because I use top of the range (expensive) heatsink compound - I
    always remove only the fan for cleaning and do everything possible to avoid
    disturbing the heatsink.

    I'm a little surprised that someone who gives advice on a support group
    could make such an idiotic comment!
     
    ian field, Sep 3, 2010
    #10
  11. ian field

    ian field Guest

    "Mike Easter" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > ian field wrote:
    >> "Mike Easter"

    >
    >>> Putting your hand on the heatsink fins is not the way to check/
    >>> accurately measure/ assess/ the CPU's temperature.

    >
    >> One of my PCs had temperature monitoring utils but I can't remember which
    >> one.

    >
    > Get into your mobo's setup or read your mobo manual to determine what
    > information the mobo can provide.
    >
    >> Maybe they disappeared after a clean install/upgrade or maybe I retired
    >> that MOBO - can't remember which.

    >
    > What is this mobo? What is this CPU?



    I'm not giving you any more ammo to make idiotic comments.
     
    ian field, Sep 3, 2010
    #11
  12. ian field

    Mike Easter Guest

    ian field wrote:
    > "Mike Easter"
    >> What is this mobo? What is this CPU?


    > I'm not giving you any more ammo to make idiotic comments.


    Why should I assume that someone who doesn't know what his CPU or his
    mobo is - or 'can't say' - should know thermal compound from other
    grunge in his heatsink fins or what he unclipped from what?

    Starting a topic talking about why the CPU fan wasn't necessary without
    including the CPU in question doesn't tell me that the OP is well informed.


    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Sep 3, 2010
    #12
  13. ian field

    ian field Guest

    "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 19:21:34 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >
    >> "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    >> news:p...
    >>> On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 17:23:43 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Sitting here wondering what all the fuss is about regarding CPU fans.
    >>>>
    >>>> The fan didn't start because it was clogged with tobacco tar, dust &
    >>>> fluff, so out it came for cleaning.
    >>>>
    >>>> Before putting it back together I decided to run some Slick50 PTFE oil
    >>>> into the fan bearing, so the fan is laying flat on the video card so I
    >>>> can keep it spinning and work the oil into the bearing.
    >>>>
    >>>> Obviously as the fan is not at this moment attached to the heatsink I
    >>>> keep putting my hand on the fins to check the temperature - its not
    >>>> getting any more than luke warm.
    >>>
    >>> Under load it could draw double the wattage.

    >>
    >> Maybe I don't work it that hard.
    >>
    >> When I unclipped the fan from the heatsink I found the fins packed with
    >> a great wad of gunge - the fan hasn't been blowing air through the fins
    >> for quite some time and there haven't been any of the kind of glitches
    >> I'd associate with an overheating CPU.

    >
    > Most decent motherboards provide fan control for noise reduction. When I
    > encode mpeg video my fan speed rises slightly as the CPU warms. At idle
    > the CPU fan turns at 2000 rpm, that's less than half full speed. The
    > 120mm chassis fan has the same control. As the chassis temp rises the fan
    > speed increases. I can set the motherboard for high performance say if I
    > wanted to overclock this quad core to 4ghz. I've tried it. Both fans run
    > at max RPM and the box sounds like a vacuum cleaner. I guess my point is
    > that if you had fan speed control and your heat sink became clogged you
    > would have noticed an increase in fan speed before it was so clogged it
    > stopped the fan. Depending on how much usage the CPU gets you might get
    > by with no fan at all as long as your sink device has sufficient surcase
    > area. A lot of Dell computers several years ago had a towering heat sink
    > with no dedicated fan, just a 120mm fan in the back.



    On this MOBO the CPU fan speed seems to be determined entirely by the
    combined effect of how good a job I make of cleaning the fan blades and how
    much PTFE oil I manage to work into the bearing.

    Previously the fan was noisy because the gunge on the blades was hitting the
    gunge on the fins.

    Now I've cleaned it, it isn't any quieter because its spinning a hell of a
    lot faster.
     
    ian field, Sep 3, 2010
    #13
  14. ian field

    ian field Guest

    "Mike Easter" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > ian field wrote:
    >> "Mike Easter"
    >>> What is this mobo? What is this CPU?

    >
    >> I'm not giving you any more ammo to make idiotic comments.

    >
    > Why should I assume that someone who doesn't know what his CPU or his mobo
    > is - or 'can't say' - should know thermal compound from other grunge in
    > his heatsink fins or what he unclipped from what?
    >
    > Starting a topic talking about why the CPU fan wasn't necessary without
    > including the CPU in question doesn't tell me that the OP is well
    > informed.



    So faced with *ANY* void in the info, you have a standard fallback of
    assuming the OP is as thick as you?
     
    ian field, Sep 3, 2010
    #14
  15. ian field

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 21:18:08 +0100, ian field wrote:

    > "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >> On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 19:21:34 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:p...
    >>>> On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 17:23:43 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Sitting here wondering what all the fuss is about regarding CPU
    >>>>> fans.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The fan didn't start because it was clogged with tobacco tar, dust &
    >>>>> fluff, so out it came for cleaning.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Before putting it back together I decided to run some Slick50 PTFE
    >>>>> oil into the fan bearing, so the fan is laying flat on the video
    >>>>> card so I can keep it spinning and work the oil into the bearing.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Obviously as the fan is not at this moment attached to the heatsink
    >>>>> I keep putting my hand on the fins to check the temperature - its
    >>>>> not getting any more than luke warm.
    >>>>
    >>>> Under load it could draw double the wattage.
    >>>
    >>> Maybe I don't work it that hard.
    >>>
    >>> When I unclipped the fan from the heatsink I found the fins packed
    >>> with a great wad of gunge - the fan hasn't been blowing air through
    >>> the fins for quite some time and there haven't been any of the kind of
    >>> glitches I'd associate with an overheating CPU.

    >>
    >> Most decent motherboards provide fan control for noise reduction. When
    >> I encode mpeg video my fan speed rises slightly as the CPU warms. At
    >> idle the CPU fan turns at 2000 rpm, that's less than half full speed.
    >> The 120mm chassis fan has the same control. As the chassis temp rises
    >> the fan speed increases. I can set the motherboard for high performance
    >> say if I wanted to overclock this quad core to 4ghz. I've tried it.
    >> Both fans run at max RPM and the box sounds like a vacuum cleaner. I
    >> guess my point is that if you had fan speed control and your heat sink
    >> became clogged you would have noticed an increase in fan speed before
    >> it was so clogged it stopped the fan. Depending on how much usage the
    >> CPU gets you might get by with no fan at all as long as your sink
    >> device has sufficient surcase area. A lot of Dell computers several
    >> years ago had a towering heat sink with no dedicated fan, just a 120mm
    >> fan in the back.

    >
    >
    > On this MOBO the CPU fan speed seems to be determined entirely by the
    > combined effect of how good a job I make of cleaning the fan blades and
    > how much PTFE oil I manage to work into the bearing.
    >
    > Previously the fan was noisy because the gunge on the blades was hitting
    > the gunge on the fins.
    >
    > Now I've cleaned it, it isn't any quieter because its spinning a hell of
    > a lot faster.


    Check in the Power section of your BIOS setup if you haven't already
    and see if there is speed control. Usually there is if the fan itself is
    3 wire and plugs into a 3 prong connector on the mobo.



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Sep 3, 2010
    #15
  16. ian field

    ian field Guest

    "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 21:18:08 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >
    >> "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    >> news:p...
    >>> On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 19:21:34 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:p...
    >>>>> On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 17:23:43 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Sitting here wondering what all the fuss is about regarding CPU
    >>>>>> fans.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The fan didn't start because it was clogged with tobacco tar, dust &
    >>>>>> fluff, so out it came for cleaning.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Before putting it back together I decided to run some Slick50 PTFE
    >>>>>> oil into the fan bearing, so the fan is laying flat on the video
    >>>>>> card so I can keep it spinning and work the oil into the bearing.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Obviously as the fan is not at this moment attached to the heatsink
    >>>>>> I keep putting my hand on the fins to check the temperature - its
    >>>>>> not getting any more than luke warm.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Under load it could draw double the wattage.
    >>>>
    >>>> Maybe I don't work it that hard.
    >>>>
    >>>> When I unclipped the fan from the heatsink I found the fins packed
    >>>> with a great wad of gunge - the fan hasn't been blowing air through
    >>>> the fins for quite some time and there haven't been any of the kind of
    >>>> glitches I'd associate with an overheating CPU.
    >>>
    >>> Most decent motherboards provide fan control for noise reduction. When
    >>> I encode mpeg video my fan speed rises slightly as the CPU warms. At
    >>> idle the CPU fan turns at 2000 rpm, that's less than half full speed.
    >>> The 120mm chassis fan has the same control. As the chassis temp rises
    >>> the fan speed increases. I can set the motherboard for high performance
    >>> say if I wanted to overclock this quad core to 4ghz. I've tried it.
    >>> Both fans run at max RPM and the box sounds like a vacuum cleaner. I
    >>> guess my point is that if you had fan speed control and your heat sink
    >>> became clogged you would have noticed an increase in fan speed before
    >>> it was so clogged it stopped the fan. Depending on how much usage the
    >>> CPU gets you might get by with no fan at all as long as your sink
    >>> device has sufficient surcase area. A lot of Dell computers several
    >>> years ago had a towering heat sink with no dedicated fan, just a 120mm
    >>> fan in the back.

    >>
    >>
    >> On this MOBO the CPU fan speed seems to be determined entirely by the
    >> combined effect of how good a job I make of cleaning the fan blades and
    >> how much PTFE oil I manage to work into the bearing.
    >>
    >> Previously the fan was noisy because the gunge on the blades was hitting
    >> the gunge on the fins.
    >>
    >> Now I've cleaned it, it isn't any quieter because its spinning a hell of
    >> a lot faster.

    >
    > Check in the Power section of your BIOS setup if you haven't already
    > and see if there is speed control. Usually there is if the fan itself is
    > 3 wire and plugs into a 3 prong connector on the mobo.

    Its a 3-pin connector - but only 2 wires implemented.
     
    ian field, Sep 3, 2010
    #16
  17. ian field

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 21:38:16 +0100, ian field wrote:

    > "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >> On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 21:18:08 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:p...
    >>>> On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 19:21:34 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:p...
    >>>>>> On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 17:23:43 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Sitting here wondering what all the fuss is about regarding CPU
    >>>>>>> fans.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> The fan didn't start because it was clogged with tobacco tar, dust
    >>>>>>> & fluff, so out it came for cleaning.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Before putting it back together I decided to run some Slick50 PTFE
    >>>>>>> oil into the fan bearing, so the fan is laying flat on the video
    >>>>>>> card so I can keep it spinning and work the oil into the bearing.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Obviously as the fan is not at this moment attached to the
    >>>>>>> heatsink I keep putting my hand on the fins to check the
    >>>>>>> temperature - its not getting any more than luke warm.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Under load it could draw double the wattage.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Maybe I don't work it that hard.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> When I unclipped the fan from the heatsink I found the fins packed
    >>>>> with a great wad of gunge - the fan hasn't been blowing air through
    >>>>> the fins for quite some time and there haven't been any of the kind
    >>>>> of glitches I'd associate with an overheating CPU.
    >>>>
    >>>> Most decent motherboards provide fan control for noise reduction.
    >>>> When I encode mpeg video my fan speed rises slightly as the CPU
    >>>> warms. At idle the CPU fan turns at 2000 rpm, that's less than half
    >>>> full speed. The 120mm chassis fan has the same control. As the
    >>>> chassis temp rises the fan speed increases. I can set the motherboard
    >>>> for high performance say if I wanted to overclock this quad core to
    >>>> 4ghz. I've tried it. Both fans run at max RPM and the box sounds like
    >>>> a vacuum cleaner. I guess my point is that if you had fan speed
    >>>> control and your heat sink became clogged you would have noticed an
    >>>> increase in fan speed before it was so clogged it stopped the fan.
    >>>> Depending on how much usage the CPU gets you might get by with no fan
    >>>> at all as long as your sink device has sufficient surcase area. A lot
    >>>> of Dell computers several years ago had a towering heat sink with no
    >>>> dedicated fan, just a 120mm fan in the back.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> On this MOBO the CPU fan speed seems to be determined entirely by the
    >>> combined effect of how good a job I make of cleaning the fan blades
    >>> and how much PTFE oil I manage to work into the bearing.
    >>>
    >>> Previously the fan was noisy because the gunge on the blades was
    >>> hitting the gunge on the fins.
    >>>
    >>> Now I've cleaned it, it isn't any quieter because its spinning a hell
    >>> of a lot faster.

    >>
    >> Check in the Power section of your BIOS setup if you haven't already
    >> and see if there is speed control. Usually there is if the fan itself
    >> is 3 wire and plugs into a 3 prong connector on the mobo.

    > Its a 3-pin connector - but only 2 wires implemented.


    Ok well that might present a problem. My Asus M4A8T-E can control a DC fan
    with two wires. My 120mm chassis fan is such a two wire DC fan but is
    controlled by the main board. It provides no feedback to the mobo as far
    as rotation speed however so it shows up as N/A in the power section of
    my BIOS wheras the CPU fan actually being 4 wire does show the rotational
    speed. I don't need to know how fast the 120 turns, I can hear it. The
    feedback was to set an alarm in case your fan stopped. Now most boards do
    it by temperature limits.



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Sep 3, 2010
    #17
  18. ian field

    Aardvark Guest

    On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 21:18:08 +0100, ian field wrote:

    > Now I've cleaned it, it isn't any quieter because its spinning a hell of
    > a lot faster.


    Maybe because it can because all the gunge slowing it down has gone? How
    old would you say the fan is?



    --
    "When I was a kid I used to pray every night for a new bicycle.
    Then I realised God doesn’t work that way, so I stole one and
    prayed for forgiveness." - Emo Phillips
     
    Aardvark, Sep 3, 2010
    #18
  19. ian field

    ian field Guest

    "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 21:38:16 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >
    >> "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    >> news:p...
    >>> On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 21:18:08 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:p...
    >>>>> On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 19:21:34 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:p...
    >>>>>>> On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 17:23:43 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Sitting here wondering what all the fuss is about regarding CPU
    >>>>>>>> fans.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> The fan didn't start because it was clogged with tobacco tar, dust
    >>>>>>>> & fluff, so out it came for cleaning.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Before putting it back together I decided to run some Slick50 PTFE
    >>>>>>>> oil into the fan bearing, so the fan is laying flat on the video
    >>>>>>>> card so I can keep it spinning and work the oil into the bearing.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Obviously as the fan is not at this moment attached to the
    >>>>>>>> heatsink I keep putting my hand on the fins to check the
    >>>>>>>> temperature - its not getting any more than luke warm.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Under load it could draw double the wattage.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Maybe I don't work it that hard.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> When I unclipped the fan from the heatsink I found the fins packed
    >>>>>> with a great wad of gunge - the fan hasn't been blowing air through
    >>>>>> the fins for quite some time and there haven't been any of the kind
    >>>>>> of glitches I'd associate with an overheating CPU.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Most decent motherboards provide fan control for noise reduction.
    >>>>> When I encode mpeg video my fan speed rises slightly as the CPU
    >>>>> warms. At idle the CPU fan turns at 2000 rpm, that's less than half
    >>>>> full speed. The 120mm chassis fan has the same control. As the
    >>>>> chassis temp rises the fan speed increases. I can set the motherboard
    >>>>> for high performance say if I wanted to overclock this quad core to
    >>>>> 4ghz. I've tried it. Both fans run at max RPM and the box sounds like
    >>>>> a vacuum cleaner. I guess my point is that if you had fan speed
    >>>>> control and your heat sink became clogged you would have noticed an
    >>>>> increase in fan speed before it was so clogged it stopped the fan.
    >>>>> Depending on how much usage the CPU gets you might get by with no fan
    >>>>> at all as long as your sink device has sufficient surcase area. A lot
    >>>>> of Dell computers several years ago had a towering heat sink with no
    >>>>> dedicated fan, just a 120mm fan in the back.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> On this MOBO the CPU fan speed seems to be determined entirely by the
    >>>> combined effect of how good a job I make of cleaning the fan blades
    >>>> and how much PTFE oil I manage to work into the bearing.
    >>>>
    >>>> Previously the fan was noisy because the gunge on the blades was
    >>>> hitting the gunge on the fins.
    >>>>
    >>>> Now I've cleaned it, it isn't any quieter because its spinning a hell
    >>>> of a lot faster.
    >>>
    >>> Check in the Power section of your BIOS setup if you haven't already
    >>> and see if there is speed control. Usually there is if the fan itself
    >>> is 3 wire and plugs into a 3 prong connector on the mobo.

    >> Its a 3-pin connector - but only 2 wires implemented.

    >
    > Ok well that might present a problem. My Asus M4A8T-E can control a DC fan
    > with two wires. My 120mm chassis fan is such a two wire DC fan but is
    > controlled by the main board. It provides no feedback to the mobo as far
    > as rotation speed however so it shows up as N/A in the power section of
    > my BIOS wheras the CPU fan actually being 4 wire does show the rotational
    > speed. I don't need to know how fast the 120 turns, I can hear it. The
    > feedback was to set an alarm in case your fan stopped. Now most boards do
    > it by temperature limits.



    I just remembered an experiment years ago with an old Duron less than 1GHz,
    with the heatsink off I held my finger on the CPU to see how quick it heated
    up - it got painfully hot pretty much instantly, I hit the power switch PDQ!

    That one also suffered badly from dust & tobacco tar compacted in the fan,
    and that one also didn't get particularly hot when the fan was obviously too
    gunged to be doing much.

    But then the occasional Youtube clip is probably the hardest I ever make any
    of my PCs work.
     
    ian field, Sep 3, 2010
    #19
  20. ian field

    ian field Guest

    "Aardvark" <> wrote in message
    news:i5roq7$4p7$-september.org...
    > On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 21:18:08 +0100, ian field wrote:
    >
    >> Now I've cleaned it, it isn't any quieter because its spinning a hell of
    >> a lot faster.

    >
    > Maybe because it can because all the gunge slowing it down has gone? How
    > old would you say the fan is?


    Pretty old - I've cleaned & lubed it at least once before about 3 years ago.
     
    ian field, Sep 3, 2010
    #20
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