CPU Advancement

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by John, Oct 2, 2006.

  1. John

    John Guest

    Why is it taking so long for CPUs to advance from where they are at
    present?

    The jump from 200 and 500Mhz processors to 2 Ghz didn't take too long.

    Why is it taking so long for the current crop of processors around the
    2 to 3 Ghz mark to advance to say 10 Ghz? What is the hold up?

    It seems that it has taken quite a number of years for an advance of
    just 1 Ghz from processors of about 1.8 Ghz to 2.8 Ghz.

    Are we likely to see a speed up any time soon and the advancement of
    technology?

    John
    John, Oct 2, 2006
    #1
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  2. John

    Travis Guest

    Get three 3.2Ghz processors and build your own computer and put all
    three of them in and you have a 10ghz computer.

    John wrote:
    > Why is it taking so long for CPUs to advance from where they are at
    > present?
    >
    > The jump from 200 and 500Mhz processors to 2 Ghz didn't take too long.
    >
    > Why is it taking so long for the current crop of processors around the
    > 2 to 3 Ghz mark to advance to say 10 Ghz? What is the hold up?
    >
    > It seems that it has taken quite a number of years for an advance of
    > just 1 Ghz from processors of about 1.8 Ghz to 2.8 Ghz.
    >
    > Are we likely to see a speed up any time soon and the advancement of
    > technology?
    >
    > John
    Travis, Oct 3, 2006
    #2
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  3. John

    bmoag Guest

    The serious answer is heat.
    The P4 architecture could be pushed to higher clock speeds but the power
    demands and subsequent heat generation were impractical for general desktop
    use. The P4 architecture was very inefficient compared to Athlon XP
    processors which were capable of more useful work at significantly slower
    clock speeds.
    The new core dual processors use a more efficient design that requires less
    power and does more work at a slower clock speed than P4 class processors.
    Most people would see that as real progress. Most test results show Intel
    has finally leap-frogged back over AMD after trailing for several years even
    in the mid-level core duo processors.
    Anyway, unless you edit long video segments, work on very large
    multi-layered Photoshop files or insist on playing the latest 3d games
    cranked all the way up you can probably get by with PIII class processor and
    never know the difference.
    bmoag, Oct 3, 2006
    #3
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