CPL filters, B&W or Hoya ?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Tony Gartshore, Dec 31, 2006.

  1. Is there any appreciable difference in quality/performance/colour shift
    etc between the Hoya Super HMC Pro and the B&W Slim MRC versions ?

    Prices are pretty similar..

    To go on a Canon 24-105 L if that makes any difference..

    T.
     
    Tony Gartshore, Dec 31, 2006
    #1
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  2. Tony Gartshore

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Tony Gartshore wrote:
    > Is there any appreciable difference in quality/performance/colour shift
    > etc between the Hoya Super HMC Pro and the B&W Slim MRC versions ?
    >
    > Prices are pretty similar..
    >
    > To go on a Canon 24-105 L if that makes any difference..
    >


    I think that is B+W. Quality of the models above
    should be similar. Slim model may be better for
    vignetting if an issue with that lens .. but may
    not have front threads.

    Phil
     
    Phil Wheeler, Dec 31, 2006
    #2
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  3. Tony Gartshore

    Ken Lucke Guest

    In article <4597db1a$0$7739$>, Phil Wheeler
    <> wrote:

    > Tony Gartshore wrote:
    > > Is there any appreciable difference in quality/performance/colour shift
    > > etc between the Hoya Super HMC Pro and the B&W Slim MRC versions ?
    > >
    > > Prices are pretty similar..
    > >
    > > To go on a Canon 24-105 L if that makes any difference..
    > >

    >
    > I think that is B+W. Quality of the models above
    > should be similar. Slim model may be better for
    > vignetting if an issue with that lens .. but may
    > not have front threads.


    I use a standard B+W on my 24-105L, and I get no vignetting.

    --
    You need only reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a
    reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating
    the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for
    independence.
    -- Charles A. Beard
     
    Ken Lucke, Dec 31, 2006
    #3
  4. In article <4597db1a$0$7739$>, wt6uh-ng7
    @yahoo.com says...
    >
    > I think that is B+W. Quality of the models above
    > should be similar. Slim model may be better for
    > vignetting if an issue with that lens .. but may
    > not have front threads.
    >


    Indeed B + W Phil.. :)

    Not sure if front threads would be an issue or not.. Hood mounts onto
    onto outside of lens barrel and I'm unlikely to want to stack filters.

    Worth checking on though.

    T.
    > Phil
    >
     
    Tony Gartshore, Dec 31, 2006
    #4
  5. Tony Gartshore wrote:

    > Is there any appreciable difference in quality/performance/colour
    > shift etc between the Hoya Super HMC Pro and the B&W Slim MRC
    > versions ?


    For CPLs stay away from the high-end Hoya as they use a split ring to hold
    the glass element in. The glass has a tendency of falling out at the most
    inopportune time. Stay with B&W if you want superior quality.







    Rita
     
    =?iso-8859-15?Q?Rita_=C4_Berkowitz?=, Jan 1, 2007
    #5
  6. Tony Gartshore

    Paul Rubin Guest

    Rita Ä Berkowitz <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> writes:
    > For CPLs stay away from the high-end Hoya as they use a split ring to
    > hold the glass element in. The glass has a tendency of falling out at
    > the most inopportune time. Stay with B&W if you want superior quality.


    What about Nikon? And what's wrong with the cheap ones anyway?
     
    Paul Rubin, Jan 1, 2007
    #6
  7. Tony Gartshore

    Ken Lucke Guest

    In article <>, Paul Rubin
    <http://> wrote:

    > Rita Ä Berkowitz <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> writes:
    > > For CPLs stay away from the high-end Hoya as they use a split ring to
    > > hold the glass element in. The glass has a tendency of falling out at
    > > the most inopportune time. Stay with B&W if you want superior quality.

    >
    > What about Nikon? And what's wrong with the cheap ones anyway?


    Because they're cheap.

    They don't make them cheap without compromising somewhere, and your
    image quality is factored by the _lowest_ quality glass that it goes
    through on the way to the sensor/film.

    --
    You need only reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a
    reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating
    the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for
    independence.
    -- Charles A. Beard
     
    Ken Lucke, Jan 1, 2007
    #7
  8. In article <>, =?iso-8859-15?Q?
    Rita_=C4_Berkowitz?= <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> says...
    > Tony Gartshore wrote:
    >
    > > Is there any appreciable difference in quality/performance/colour
    > > shift etc between the Hoya Super HMC Pro and the B&W Slim MRC
    > > versions ?

    >
    > For CPLs stay away from the high-end Hoya as they use a split ring to hold
    > the glass element in. The glass has a tendency of falling out at the most
    > inopportune time. Stay with B&W if you want superior quality.
    >

    Thank you..

    Not something I had considered I must admit..

    T.
     
    Tony Gartshore, Jan 1, 2007
    #8
  9. Paul Rubin wrote:

    > Rita Ä Berkowitz <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> writes:
    >> For CPLs stay away from the high-end Hoya as they use a split ring to
    >> hold the glass element in. The glass has a tendency of falling out
    >> at the most inopportune time. Stay with B&W if you want superior
    >> quality.

    >
    > What about Nikon? And what's wrong with the cheap ones anyway?


    I haven't used a Nikon CPL so I can't comment on its build quality. I guess
    he could use a cheap Hoya since the glass is going to fall out anyway.






    Rita
     
    =?iso-8859-1?Q?Rita_=C4_Berkowitz?=, Jan 1, 2007
    #9
  10. In article <>, =?iso-8859-1?Q?Rita_=C4
    _Berkowitz?= <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> says...
    > Paul Rubin wrote:
    >
    > > Rita Ä Berkowitz <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> writes:
    > >> For CPLs stay away from the high-end Hoya as they use a split ring to
    > >> hold the glass element in. The glass has a tendency of falling out
    > >> at the most inopportune time. Stay with B&W if you want superior
    > >> quality.

    > >
    > > What about Nikon? And what's wrong with the cheap ones anyway?

    >
    > I haven't used a Nikon CPL so I can't comment on its build quality. I guess
    > he could use a cheap Hoya since the glass is going to fall out anyway.
    >

    Having shelled out for Canon 'L' glass why would I be interested in
    saving a few quid on a cheap CPL ?

    Or are the Hoya Pro and B+W multicoated jobs regarded as cheap ?

    T.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Rita
    >
    >
    >
     
    Tony Gartshore, Jan 1, 2007
    #10
  11. Tony Gartshore wrote:

    >> I haven't used a Nikon CPL so I can't comment on its build quality.
    >> I guess he could use a cheap Hoya since the glass is going to fall
    >> out anyway.
    >>

    > Having shelled out for Canon 'L' glass why would I be interested in
    > saving a few quid on a cheap CPL ?


    Well, if the build quality is good it really doesn't matter what brand is
    stamped on the rim. I use the Nikon L37c UV filters on my lenses for
    protection and they are great inexpensive filters. As I said I can't attest
    to the build quality of Nikon's CPLs.

    > Or are the Hoya Pro and B+W multicoated jobs regarded as cheap ?


    Just add a few more quid and get the B+W KSM C-POL MRC and never worry
    again. Its high quality machined brass body is virtually indestructible and
    optical quality is great.







    Rita
     
    =?iso-8859-15?Q?Rita_=C4_Berkowitz?=, Jan 1, 2007
    #11
  12. Tony Gartshore

    Ken Lucke Guest

    In article <>, Tony Gartshore
    <> wrote:

    > In article <>, =?iso-8859-1?Q?Rita_=C4
    > _Berkowitz?= <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> says...
    > > Paul Rubin wrote:
    > >
    > > > Rita Ä Berkowitz <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> writes:
    > > >> For CPLs stay away from the high-end Hoya as they use a split ring to
    > > >> hold the glass element in. The glass has a tendency of falling out
    > > >> at the most inopportune time. Stay with B&W if you want superior
    > > >> quality.
    > > >
    > > > What about Nikon? And what's wrong with the cheap ones anyway?

    > >
    > > I haven't used a Nikon CPL so I can't comment on its build quality. I guess
    > > he could use a cheap Hoya since the glass is going to fall out anyway.
    > >

    > Having shelled out for Canon 'L' glass why would I be interested in
    > saving a few quid on a cheap CPL ?
    >
    > Or are the Hoya Pro and B+W multicoated jobs regarded as cheap ?
    >
    > T.


    No.

    --
    You need only reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a
    reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating
    the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for
    independence.
    -- Charles A. Beard
     
    Ken Lucke, Jan 1, 2007
    #12
  13. =?iso-8859-15?Q?Rita_=C4_Berkowitz?=, Jan 1, 2007
    #13
  14. In article <>, =?iso-8859-15?Q?
    Rita_=C4_Berkowitz?= <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> says...
    > Just add a few more quid and get the B+W KSM C-POL MRC and never worry
    > again. Its high quality machined brass body is virtually indestructible and
    > optical quality is great.
    >
    >

    Well, the original choice was between that or the Hoya pro.. So I guess
    you've answered the question...

    Thanks..

    T.
     
    Tony Gartshore, Jan 1, 2007
    #14
  15. Paul Rubin wrote:

    > Rita Ä Berkowitz <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> writes:
    >
    >>For CPLs stay away from the high-end Hoya as they use a split ring to
    >>hold the glass element in. The glass has a tendency of falling out at
    >>the most inopportune time. Stay with B&W if you want superior quality.

    >
    >
    > What about Nikon? And what's wrong with the cheap ones anyway?


    Polarized Light and Evaluating Polarizing Filters
    http://www.clarkvision.com/photoinfo/evaluating_polarizing_filters

    Roger
     
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Jan 1, 2007
    #15
  16. Rita Ä Berkowitz wrote:

    > For CPLs stay away from the high-end Hoya as they use a split ring to
    > hold the glass element in. The glass has a tendency of falling out at
    > the most inopportune time. Stay with B&W if you want superior quality.
    >
    > Rita


    I have used Hoya multicoated filters for many years, and have
    never had a problem with a split ring coming out, except the
    one time I dropped a lens on a rock and the UV filter shattered
    and the split ring came out ;-). The lens was unscratched!
    (Now I have a spare set of screw threads and split ring.)

    Roger
     
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Jan 1, 2007
    #16
  17. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark) wrote:

    > I have used Hoya multicoated filters for many years, and have
    > never had a problem with a split ring coming out, except the
    > one time I dropped a lens on a rock and the UV filter shattered
    > and the split ring came out ;-). The lens was unscratched!
    > (Now I have a spare set of screw threads and split ring.)


    You're just lucky. The inherent design is totally lame and unacceptable
    while being prone to popping free. For a few dollars more you can get a B+W
    that is made from brass and has a screw-in retainer for the element. Smart
    money goes to the B+W.







    Rita
     
    =?iso-8859-15?Q?Rita_=C4_Berkowitz?=, Jan 1, 2007
    #17
  18. Tony Gartshore

    King Sardon Guest

    On Mon, 1 Jan 2007 16:22:24 -0500, Rita Ä Berkowitz <ritaberk2O04
    @aol.com> wrote:

    >Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark) wrote:
    >
    >> I have used Hoya multicoated filters for many years, and have
    >> never had a problem with a split ring coming out, except the
    >> one time I dropped a lens on a rock and the UV filter shattered
    >> and the split ring came out ;-). The lens was unscratched!
    >> (Now I have a spare set of screw threads and split ring.)

    >
    >You're just lucky. The inherent design is totally lame and unacceptable
    >while being prone to popping free. For a few dollars more you can get a B+W
    >that is made from brass and has a screw-in retainer for the element. Smart
    >money goes to the B+W.


    How does one know if the B+W filters have threads on both sides? It is
    not clear from the descriptions at B&H.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=NavBar&A=search&Q=&ci=115

    KS
     
    King Sardon, Jan 1, 2007
    #18
  19. King Sardon wrote:

    > How does one know if the B+W filters have threads on both sides? It is
    > not clear from the descriptions at B&H.


    Anything that states "Ultra Thin" or "Ultra Slim" isn't going to have
    threads. It's best to e-mail or call to be 100% sure before ordering.






    Rita
     
    =?iso-8859-1?Q?Rita_=C4_Berkowitz?=, Jan 2, 2007
    #19
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