Could flash memory replace DVD/Hard Drives if this pans out?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Dec 3, 2012.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

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  2. RichA

    nospam Guest

    nospam, Dec 3, 2012
    #2
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  3. RichA

    RichA Guest

    On Dec 3, 5:49 pm, nospam <> wrote:
    > In article
    > <>,
    >
    > RichA <> wrote:
    > >http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20579077

    >
    > you're late to the party. flash memory already *is* replacing hard
    > drives.


    Yes, you can buy them, but size is an issue and cost.
    RichA, Dec 3, 2012
    #3
  4. RichA

    Rob Guest

    On 4/12/2012 10:11 AM, RichA wrote:
    > On Dec 3, 5:49 pm, nospam <> wrote:
    >> In article
    >> <>,
    >>
    >> RichA <> wrote:
    >>> http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20579077

    >>
    >> you're late to the party. flash memory already *is* replacing hard
    >> drives.

    >
    > Yes, you can buy them, but size is an issue and cost.
    >



    Interesting pricing - memory.

    Its not consistent, SD, CF, DDR3, HDD.

    I wonder if it will ever get sorted to a level playing field.
    Rob, Dec 4, 2012
    #4
  5. RichA <> wrote:

    >http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20579077



    The latest Apple MacBook Pro range is only sold with flash memory if
    you choose the Retina display.

    Hard drives are only available with the cheaper MacBook Pro models
    that don't have the Retina display.
    Anthony Polson, Dec 4, 2012
    #5
  6. RichA

    Whisky-dave Guest

    On Tuesday, December 4, 2012 5:54:07 AM UTC, Rob wrote:
    > On 4/12/2012 10:11 AM, RichA wrote:
    >
    > > On Dec 3, 5:49 pm, nospam <> wrote:

    >
    > >> In article

    >
    > >> <>,

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> RichA <> wrote:

    >
    > >>> http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20579077

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> you're late to the party. flash memory already *is* replacing hard

    >
    > >> drives.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Yes, you can buy them, but size is an issue and cost.

    >
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Interesting pricing - memory.
    >
    >
    >
    > Its not consistent, SD, CF, DDR3, HDD.
    >
    >
    >
    > I wonder if it will ever get sorted to a level playing field.


    Why should it, if differnt products have difernt manufacturing processes why should such things become level ?
    I'm hoping prices will drop too.
    Whisky-dave, Dec 4, 2012
    #6
  7. RichA

    ray Guest

    ray, Dec 4, 2012
    #7
  8. RichA

    nospam Guest

    nospam, Dec 4, 2012
    #8
  9. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Alfred
    Molon <> wrote:

    > But how long will data last in flash memory? 1, 10, 100, 1000 years?


    longer than a hard drive.
    nospam, Dec 4, 2012
    #9
  10. RichA

    Tim Conway Guest

    Tim Conway, Dec 5, 2012
    #10
  11. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <k9m4f6$ddm$>, Tim Conway
    <> wrote:

    > I bet the read/write times of flash drives make standard HDDs look like
    > dinosaurs.


    definitely. the difference is huge.
    nospam, Dec 5, 2012
    #11
  12. RichA

    Guest

    On Tue, 4 Dec 2012 08:53:29 -0800, Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    > Yup!
    > The current best price I have found for a 960GB SSD (the current larges
    > available) is $1,119.99.


    Once upon a time I paid more than that for a 40 meg Quantum SCSI hard drive for my trusty
    old Amiga.
    , Dec 5, 2012
    #12
  13. RichA

    DanP Guest

    On Tuesday, December 4, 2012 3:58:49 PM UTC, ray wrote:
    > On Mon, 03 Dec 2012 14:44:13 -0800, RichA wrote:
    >
    > > http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20579077

    >
    > Eventually? - probably. But it will be some time before 1TB solid state
    > AFFORDABLE drives are available.


    Why do you need 1Tb SSD in your computer? Store your data on a RAID NAS with HDD. That way you can afford to have a small but fast SSD that helps yourcomputer boot in seconds, store your data in a safe place, access it from other computers in your house or even from outside. And archive your data on HDD's.

    I am on my first SSD, I have heard they might not last long. I have changedsome settings on my system to be SSD friendly and not abuse it. Even if itfails in 6 months I would buy the same one again.

    Mine is a 60Gb, I have read less storage gives more reliability and is cheap enough to be replaced yet big enough to hold my system.


    DanP
    DanP, Dec 5, 2012
    #13
  14. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Alfred
    Molon <> wrote:

    > > Why do you need 1Tb SSD in your computer?

    >
    > To store image files. It's impractical to have a brick attached with a
    > cable to a notebook computer. It's better if the brick is inside the
    > computer case.


    you need to carry every single photo you've ever taken everywhere you
    go at all times?

    leave them on a server at home where they can be accessed at any time
    and keep only the important ones on the laptop itself.
    nospam, Dec 5, 2012
    #14
  15. RichA

    Mayayana Guest

    | > I bet the read/write times of flash drives make standard HDDs look like
    | > dinosaurs.
    |
    | definitely. the difference is huge.

    For disk access. That doesn't matter when operations
    are being done in RAM rather than page/swap file, which
    is how things usually happen on newer machines. Flash
    may be better, but if what you do now is close to instant
    then you're not going to see a difference for your money.
    (If what you do now is editing 7 GB video files with lots
    of saves, on the other hand, it might be a big difference.)
    Mayayana, Dec 5, 2012
    #15
  16. RichA

    ray Guest

    On Wed, 05 Dec 2012 02:17:53 -0800, DanP wrote:

    > On Tuesday, December 4, 2012 3:58:49 PM UTC, ray wrote:
    >> On Mon, 03 Dec 2012 14:44:13 -0800, RichA wrote:
    >>
    >> > http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20579077

    >>
    >> Eventually? - probably. But it will be some time before 1TB solid state
    >> AFFORDABLE drives are available.

    >
    > Why do you need 1Tb SSD in your computer? Store your data on a RAID NAS
    > with HDD. That way you can afford to have a small but fast SSD that
    > helps your computer boot in seconds, store your data in a safe place,
    > access it from other computers in your house or even from outside. And
    > archive your data on HDD's.
    >
    > I am on my first SSD, I have heard they might not last long. I have
    > changed some settings on my system to be SSD friendly and not abuse it.
    > Even if it fails in 6 months I would buy the same one again.
    >
    > Mine is a 60Gb, I have read less storage gives more reliability and is
    > cheap enough to be replaced yet big enough to hold my system.
    >
    >
    > DanP


    If you'll read the OP, you'll find that it asks about SSDs replacing HDDs.
    That is what I replied to. I believe 1tb is pretty much 'normal' with new
    systems.
    ray, Dec 5, 2012
    #16
  17. RichA

    DanP Guest

    On Wed, 05 Dec 2012 10:28:36 -0800, Savageduck wrote:

    > On 2012-12-05 10:10:21 -0800, Alfred Molon <>
    > said:
    >
    >> In article <>,
    >> DanP says...
    >>> Why do you need 1Tb SSD in your computer?

    >>
    >> To store image files. It's impractical to have a brick attached with a
    >> cable to a notebook computer. It's better if the brick is inside the
    >> computer case.

    >
    > Quite a lot of laptop users are replacing the optical drive (DVD/CD)
    > with an SSD to give themselves a dual HDD/SSD laptop system to give
    > themselves the benefit of the SSD speed and maintaining the workhorse
    > ability of the HDD.
    > Currently I travel with that additional pocket drive, but to call it a
    > brick is a bit of an overstatement.


    I had a look at the ExpressCard 54 SSDs so I could use a big HDD on my
    laptop but found it expensive for my budget and not easy to use on
    another computer. A DVD bay adaptor is reasonably cheap (but you lose the
    DVD/CD drive). For laptops both are good solutions for having a SSD drive
    with a separate HDD.

    If this is not good enough have a look at a hybrid drive. See the number
    of 5* reviews for this http://www.amazon.co.uk/product-reviews/B005EEZ0H0/
    ref=dp_top_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1

    I will get a cable connected NAS on my home network and will be stored
    out of sight as I certainly don't like clutter.

    For desktop users it is easier, a small new SSD for OS and and keep the
    old HDD for storage. I'd still recommend a RAID NAS if you have more than
    one computer in the house, or if you want to back up to HDD's or if you
    want your data accessible from outside your house.

    Just check the transfer rate for the SSD you are buying goes in the
    region of 400-500MB/s. SATA II will halve that rate but it will still be
    impressive.

    I need to calm down now.


    DanP
    DanP, Dec 5, 2012
    #17
  18. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <k9o5t8$gj$>, Mayayana
    <> wrote:

    > | > I bet the read/write times of flash drives make standard HDDs look like
    > | > dinosaurs.
    > |
    > | definitely. the difference is huge.
    >
    > For disk access. That doesn't matter when operations
    > are being done in RAM rather than page/swap file, which
    > is how things usually happen on newer machines.


    it depends what you're doing. most stuff is disk bound and will greatly
    benefit from ssd.

    > Flash
    > may be better, but if what you do now is close to instant
    > then you're not going to see a difference for your money.


    you obviously haven't used a machine with ssd.

    the difference is as i said, huge. even putting an ssd in an older
    machine breathes new life into it, and those machines had smaller hard
    drives so it's a relatively cheap upgrade.

    > (If what you do now is editing 7 GB video files with lots
    > of saves, on the other hand, it might be a big difference.)


    if you have an unlimited amount of money, you could put the 7 gig files
    on ssd, but more likely those files will be on a fast raid array.

    you will still get a very noticeable benefit with just the video
    editing app and os itself on ssd and the assets on a fast drive array.
    nospam, Dec 5, 2012
    #18
  19. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, ray <>
    wrote:

    > If you'll read the OP, you'll find that it asks about SSDs replacing HDDs.
    > That is what I replied to. I believe 1tb is pretty much 'normal' with new
    > systems.


    it depends on the system. many of them already come with ssd standard
    and do *not* have 1 tb.
    nospam, Dec 5, 2012
    #19
  20. RichA

    DanP Guest

    On Wed, 05 Dec 2012 19:39:39 +0000, ray wrote:

    > On Wed, 05 Dec 2012 02:17:53 -0800, DanP wrote:
    >
    >> On Tuesday, December 4, 2012 3:58:49 PM UTC, ray wrote:
    >>> On Mon, 03 Dec 2012 14:44:13 -0800, RichA wrote:
    >>>
    >>> > http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20579077
    >>>
    >>> Eventually? - probably. But it will be some time before 1TB solid
    >>> state AFFORDABLE drives are available.

    >>
    >> Why do you need 1Tb SSD in your computer? Store your data on a RAID NAS
    >> with HDD. That way you can afford to have a small but fast SSD that
    >> helps your computer boot in seconds, store your data in a safe place,
    >> access it from other computers in your house or even from outside. And
    >> archive your data on HDD's.
    >>
    >> I am on my first SSD, I have heard they might not last long. I have
    >> changed some settings on my system to be SSD friendly and not abuse it.
    >> Even if it fails in 6 months I would buy the same one again.
    >>
    >> Mine is a 60Gb, I have read less storage gives more reliability and is
    >> cheap enough to be replaced yet big enough to hold my system.
    >>
    >>
    >> DanP

    >
    > If you'll read the OP, you'll find that it asks about SSDs replacing
    > HDDs.
    > That is what I replied to. I believe 1tb is pretty much 'normal' with
    > new systems.


    SSD's will replace the HDD's role of OS drives and will push the HDD's to
    an archiving role. HDD's will still be there but will play a different
    role.

    Is like driving a car everywhere. Get a motorbike and commute faster but
    you will still be doing your shopping with the car. Except you don't die
    when you use a SSD.

    And selling your car to buy this http://databikes.com/imgs/a/c/o/e/h/
    harley_davidson__e_glide_carriage_2002_1_lgw.jpg is not recommended.


    DanP
    DanP, Dec 5, 2012
    #20
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