Copyright

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by charterisbay@yahoo.co.nz, Jan 10, 2007.

  1. Guest

    , Jan 10, 2007
    #1
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  2. Fred Dagg Guest

    On 10 Jan 2007 11:28:42 -0800, ""
    <> exclaimed:

    >These monkeys - http://www.wheelnut.co.nz/wnfunstuff.html have nicked a
    >lot of photos; is there anything to prevent this?


    Depends - were they your photos to begin with? Do you have an
    "Acceptable Use" or "Terms of Use" clause on your site?


    --
    Stupidest Comment of the Year Award:

    "People should take responsibility for their actions"

    - (Leftist) Matty F (7/1/2007), when explaining it was actually the quadbiker's fault that he was brutally murdered by Graeme Burton. According to Matty F, it was his fault that he was in the wrong place at the wrong time...
    Fred Dagg, Jan 10, 2007
    #2
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  3. Vista Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > These monkeys - http://www.wheelnut.co.nz/wnfunstuff.html have nicked a
    > lot of photos; is there anything to prevent this?
    >
    >


    If you took and own the photos, send them a cease a desist notice, and tell
    them if they don't that you will bill them or the use of your photos. If
    this does't work, you could contact their web host, as I am sure hosting
    illegally gained photos would be a breach of their terms.
    Vista, Jan 10, 2007
    #3
  4. ~misfit~ Guest

    wrote:
    > These monkeys - http://www.wheelnut.co.nz/wnfunstuff.html have nicked
    > a lot of photos; is there anything to prevent this?


    I don't know.

    However, they do seem rather stupid. That section about the world's most
    powerful diesel engine? They say 14 cylinder. The pics of the crank and the
    cylinders show very plainly that it's a 10 cylinder engine. Also, they say
    'turbo'. I don't see any evidence of that and a two-stroke, by it's very
    nature, is 'supercharged' anyway.
    --
    Shaun.
    ~misfit~, Jan 11, 2007
    #4
  5. JohnO Guest

    ~misfit~ wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > These monkeys - http://www.wheelnut.co.nz/wnfunstuff.html have nicked
    > > a lot of photos; is there anything to prevent this?

    >
    > I don't know.
    >
    > However, they do seem rather stupid. That section about the world's most
    > powerful diesel engine? They say 14 cylinder. The pics of the crank and the
    > cylinders show very plainly that it's a 10 cylinder engine. Also, they say
    > 'turbo'. I don't see any evidence of that and a two-stroke, by it's very
    > nature, is 'supercharged' anyway.
    > --
    > Shaun.


    I don't think the photos are of the same engine. The '12' designation
    on the first photo indicates 12 cylinders (typically), and there's 12
    sets of widgets along the top. Definitely 10 pots in the other photo.

    How is a 2 stroke supercharged by it's very nature? To me
    'supercharged' means a compressor driven by the engine feeds the air
    intake and has nothing to do with being 2 or 4 stroke?
    JohnO, Jan 12, 2007
    #5
  6. Don Hills Guest

    In article <>,
    "~misfit~" <> wrote:
    >
    >However, they do seem rather stupid. That section about the world's most
    >powerful diesel engine? They say 14 cylinder. The pics of the crank and the
    >cylinders show very plainly that it's a 10 cylinder engine. Also, they say
    >'turbo'. I don't see any evidence of that and a two-stroke, by it's very
    >nature, is 'supercharged' anyway.


    Having slagged the wheelnut guys, you then proceed to wedge your own foot
    firmly in your mouth. :)
    That engine, the Wartsila-Sulzer RTA96-C, is available in sizes from 6 to
    14 cylinders. It is a turbocharged 2-stroke diesel. Unlike the 2-strokes
    most of us are familiar with, it does not use the crankcase or a positive
    displacement supercharger for injecting the intake charge, hence the
    turbocharger.

    Go here for a mirror of the original article from which the pictures came:
    http://www.ultimatestupidity.com/pics/1/diesel/
    It shows pictures of 10 and 12 cylinder versions and some technical details.

    The original page, by Todd Walke, got too popular so he took it down:
    http://www.pureluckdesign.com/other/rta96c/index.htm

    You can also Google the phrase "Wartsila-Sulzer RTA96-C" and come up with
    any number of hits.

    --
    Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    "New interface closely resembles Presentation Manager,
    preparing you for the wonders of OS/2!"
    -- Advertisement on the box for Microsoft Windows 2.11 for 286
    Don Hills, Jan 12, 2007
    #6
  7. ~misfit~ Guest

    JohnO wrote:
    > ~misfit~ wrote:
    > > wrote:
    > > > These monkeys - http://www.wheelnut.co.nz/wnfunstuff.html have
    > > > nicked a lot of photos; is there anything to prevent this?

    > >
    > > I don't know.
    > >
    > > However, they do seem rather stupid. That section about the world's
    > > most powerful diesel engine? They say 14 cylinder. The pics of the
    > > crank and the cylinders show very plainly that it's a 10 cylinder
    > > engine. Also, they say 'turbo'. I don't see any evidence of that
    > > and a two-stroke, by it's very nature, is 'supercharged' anyway.
    > > --
    > > Shaun.

    >
    > I don't think the photos are of the same engine. The '12' designation
    > on the first photo indicates 12 cylinders (typically), and there's 12
    > sets of widgets along the top. Definitely 10 pots in the other photo.


    Yeah.

    > How is a 2 stroke supercharged by it's very nature? To me
    > 'supercharged' means a compressor driven by the engine feeds the air
    > intake and has nothing to do with being 2 or 4 stroke?


    Exactly. A two-stroke (typically) draws the 'charge' first into the
    crankcase (when the piston rises) where it is compressed by the piston
    coming down. It is then channeled through the transfer ports into the
    combustion chamber at higher-than-ambient pressure. This is one of the
    reasons that a two-stroke puts out relatively high power per CC compared
    with a typical four-stroke. (Or at least used to).
    --
    Shaun.
    ~misfit~, Jan 12, 2007
    #7
  8. ~misfit~ Guest

    Don Hills wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > "~misfit~" <> wrote:
    > >
    > > However, they do seem rather stupid. That section about the world's
    > > most powerful diesel engine? They say 14 cylinder. The pics of the
    > > crank and the cylinders show very plainly that it's a 10 cylinder
    > > engine. Also, they say 'turbo'. I don't see any evidence of that
    > > and a two-stroke, by it's very nature, is 'supercharged' anyway.

    >
    > Having slagged the wheelnut guys, you then proceed to wedge your own
    > foot firmly in your mouth. :)
    > That engine, the Wartsila-Sulzer RTA96-C, is available in sizes from
    > 6 to 14 cylinders. It is a turbocharged 2-stroke diesel. Unlike the
    > 2-strokes most of us are familiar with, it does not use the crankcase
    > or a positive displacement supercharger for injecting the intake
    > charge, hence the turbocharger.
    >
    > Go here for a mirror of the original article from which the pictures
    > came: http://www.ultimatestupidity.com/pics/1/diesel/
    > It shows pictures of 10 and 12 cylinder versions and some technical
    > details.
    >
    > The original page, by Todd Walke, got too popular so he took it down:
    > http://www.pureluckdesign.com/other/rta96c/index.htm
    >
    > You can also Google the phrase "Wartsila-Sulzer RTA96-C" and come up
    > with any number of hits.


    Heh! I don't see it as myself having eaten my foot. I was merely going by
    what was available on that page. You can't deny that, on the face of it, the
    wheelnut guys were being confusing to say the least?

    Strange that it doesn't use the crankcase in the usual two-stroke way.
    That's always been one of the big advantages of two-strokes, "free"
    supercharging. I remeber (vaguely) that, back in the 50s (?) a European (?)
    motorcycle manufacturer made a two cylinder two-stroke with both cylinders
    firing at the same time and a dummy cylinder (at 90 degrees to the main two
    IIRC), the sole purpose of which was to increase the supercharging effect.

    Just followed your link. Man, that's an interesting engine. 102rpm? Heh,
    must be the slowest revving two-stroke in the world as well. It's also
    *extremely* 'under-square', almost a contradiction from what one would
    expect from a two-stroke but right for the speed.

    Thanks for the correction and the link. I remember seeing a massive 12 (?)
    cylinder diesel engine at Meremere/Kopuku. It used to be used to run the
    aerial bucket-line that delivered coal form the mine to the power plant.
    About 8 - 10 miles maybe. I wonder what happened to that thing and what type
    of engine it was. I don't think it was one of these, although you never
    know.

    Cheers,
    --
    Shaun.
    ~misfit~, Jan 13, 2007
    #8
  9. E. Scrooge Guest

    "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    news:45a81f84$...
    > JohnO wrote:
    >> ~misfit~ wrote:
    >> > wrote:
    >> > > These monkeys - http://www.wheelnut.co.nz/wnfunstuff.html have
    >> > > nicked a lot of photos; is there anything to prevent this?
    >> >
    >> > I don't know.
    >> >
    >> > However, they do seem rather stupid. That section about the world's
    >> > most powerful diesel engine? They say 14 cylinder. The pics of the
    >> > crank and the cylinders show very plainly that it's a 10 cylinder
    >> > engine. Also, they say 'turbo'. I don't see any evidence of that
    >> > and a two-stroke, by it's very nature, is 'supercharged' anyway.
    >> > --
    >> > Shaun.

    >>
    >> I don't think the photos are of the same engine. The '12' designation
    >> on the first photo indicates 12 cylinders (typically), and there's 12
    >> sets of widgets along the top. Definitely 10 pots in the other photo.

    >
    > Yeah.
    >
    >> How is a 2 stroke supercharged by it's very nature? To me
    >> 'supercharged' means a compressor driven by the engine feeds the air
    >> intake and has nothing to do with being 2 or 4 stroke?

    >
    > Exactly. A two-stroke (typically) draws the 'charge' first into the
    > crankcase (when the piston rises) where it is compressed by the piston
    > coming down. It is then channeled through the transfer ports into the
    > combustion chamber at higher-than-ambient pressure. This is one of the
    > reasons that a two-stroke puts out relatively high power per CC compared
    > with a typical four-stroke. (Or at least used to).
    > --
    > Shaun.


    You're in the wrong group - unless your computer happens to be powered by a
    2 stroke. Which wouldn't entirely surprise me.
    LOL

    Not forgetting that it was your choice to play newsgroup police over Bobs
    post about his computer related problem.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Jan 13, 2007
    #9
  10. ~misfit~ Guest

    E. Scrooge wrote:
    > "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    > news:45a81f84$...
    > > JohnO wrote:
    > > > ~misfit~ wrote:
    > > > > wrote:
    > > > > > These monkeys - http://www.wheelnut.co.nz/wnfunstuff.html have
    > > > > > nicked a lot of photos; is there anything to prevent this?
    > > > >
    > > > > I don't know.
    > > > >
    > > > > However, they do seem rather stupid. That section about the
    > > > > world's most powerful diesel engine? They say 14 cylinder. The
    > > > > pics of the crank and the cylinders show very plainly that it's
    > > > > a 10 cylinder engine. Also, they say 'turbo'. I don't see any
    > > > > evidence of that and a two-stroke, by it's very nature, is
    > > > > 'supercharged' anyway. --
    > > > > Shaun.
    > > >
    > > > I don't think the photos are of the same engine. The '12'
    > > > designation on the first photo indicates 12 cylinders
    > > > (typically), and there's 12 sets of widgets along the top.
    > > > Definitely 10 pots in the other photo.

    > >
    > > Yeah.
    > >
    > > > How is a 2 stroke supercharged by it's very nature? To me
    > > > 'supercharged' means a compressor driven by the engine feeds the
    > > > air intake and has nothing to do with being 2 or 4 stroke?

    > >
    > > Exactly. A two-stroke (typically) draws the 'charge' first into the
    > > crankcase (when the piston rises) where it is compressed by the
    > > piston coming down. It is then channeled through the transfer ports
    > > into the combustion chamber at higher-than-ambient pressure. This
    > > is one of the reasons that a two-stroke puts out relatively high
    > > power per CC compared with a typical four-stroke. (Or at least used
    > > to). --
    > > Shaun.

    >
    > You're in the wrong group - unless your computer happens to be
    > powered by a 2 stroke. Which wouldn't entirely surprise me.
    > LOL


    OMG!!! That's soooo funny.

    > Not forgetting that it was your choice to play newsgroup police over
    > Bobs post about his computer related problem.


    You really are a troll aren't you Scrooge? Getting worse by the day. Time
    for you to join Roger, David et al. in the killfile.

    Buh-bye.
    --
    Shaun.
    ~misfit~, Jan 13, 2007
    #10
  11. E. Scrooge Guest

    "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > E. Scrooge wrote:
    >> "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    >> news:45a81f84$...
    >> > JohnO wrote:
    >> > > ~misfit~ wrote:
    >> > > > wrote:
    >> > > > > These monkeys - http://www.wheelnut.co.nz/wnfunstuff.html have
    >> > > > > nicked a lot of photos; is there anything to prevent this?
    >> > > >
    >> > > > I don't know.
    >> > > >
    >> > > > However, they do seem rather stupid. That section about the
    >> > > > world's most powerful diesel engine? They say 14 cylinder. The
    >> > > > pics of the crank and the cylinders show very plainly that it's
    >> > > > a 10 cylinder engine. Also, they say 'turbo'. I don't see any
    >> > > > evidence of that and a two-stroke, by it's very nature, is
    >> > > > 'supercharged' anyway. --
    >> > > > Shaun.
    >> > >
    >> > > I don't think the photos are of the same engine. The '12'
    >> > > designation on the first photo indicates 12 cylinders
    >> > > (typically), and there's 12 sets of widgets along the top.
    >> > > Definitely 10 pots in the other photo.
    >> >
    >> > Yeah.
    >> >
    >> > > How is a 2 stroke supercharged by it's very nature? To me
    >> > > 'supercharged' means a compressor driven by the engine feeds the
    >> > > air intake and has nothing to do with being 2 or 4 stroke?
    >> >
    >> > Exactly. A two-stroke (typically) draws the 'charge' first into the
    >> > crankcase (when the piston rises) where it is compressed by the
    >> > piston coming down. It is then channeled through the transfer ports
    >> > into the combustion chamber at higher-than-ambient pressure. This
    >> > is one of the reasons that a two-stroke puts out relatively high
    >> > power per CC compared with a typical four-stroke. (Or at least used
    >> > to). --
    >> > Shaun.

    >>
    >> You're in the wrong group - unless your computer happens to be
    >> powered by a 2 stroke. Which wouldn't entirely surprise me.
    >> LOL

    >
    > OMG!!! That's soooo funny.
    >
    >> Not forgetting that it was your choice to play newsgroup police over
    >> Bobs post about his computer related problem.

    >
    > You really are a troll aren't you Scrooge? Getting worse by the day. Time
    > for you to join Roger, David et al. in the killfile.
    >
    > Buh-bye.
    > --
    > Shaun.


    Up to you on whether you learn your lesson or not.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Jan 13, 2007
    #11
  12. Don Hills Guest

    In article <45a8240d$>,
    "~misfit~" <> wrote:
    >
    >Heh! I don't see it as myself having eaten my foot. I was merely going by
    >what was available on that page. You can't deny that, on the face of it, the
    >wheelnut guys were being confusing to say the least?


    You know how you don't believe everything you read, especially on the
    Internet? I would have decided that it failed the common sense test, and
    done some Googling before posting. But in this case, I'd seen the original
    site a while ago and had the bookmark already.

    >Strange that it doesn't use the crankcase in the usual two-stroke way.
    >That's always been one of the big advantages of two-strokes, "free"
    >supercharging. I remeber (vaguely) that, back in the 50s (?) a European (?)
    >motorcycle manufacturer made a two cylinder two-stroke with both cylinders
    >firing at the same time and a dummy cylinder (at 90 degrees to the main two
    >IIRC), the sole purpose of which was to increase the supercharging effect.


    The only 2-stroke diesel engines that I have seen that use crankcase
    compression are model (aircraft etc) engines.
    All the other ones I know of work like this:
    http://auto.howstuffworks.com/diesel-two-stroke1.htm

    There is no free lunch. Supercharging uses power, regardless of the method.
    The advantage of turbocharging is that it recovers energy that would
    otherwise have been lost out the exhaust. Done right, it is more efficient
    (power versus fuel used) than supercharging. Its biggest disadvantage,
    "turbo lag", which is a nuisance when used for automotive purposes where the
    power requirement is constantly changing, is not a problem in marine use
    where the engine maintains constant power for days at a time.

    --
    Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    "New interface closely resembles Presentation Manager,
    preparing you for the wonders of OS/2!"
    -- Advertisement on the box for Microsoft Windows 2.11 for 286
    Don Hills, Jan 13, 2007
    #12
  13. jasen Guest

    On 2007-01-12, ~misfit~ <> wrote:

    >> I don't think the photos are of the same engine. The '12' designation
    >> on the first photo indicates 12 cylinders (typically), and there's 12
    >> sets of widgets along the top. Definitely 10 pots in the other photo.


    > Exactly. A two-stroke (typically) draws the 'charge' first into the
    > crankcase (when the piston rises) where it is compressed by the piston
    > coming down. It is then channeled through the transfer ports into the
    > combustion chamber at higher-than-ambient pressure.


    while this is happening the exhaust port is open.... that puts a limit on
    the cylinder pressure.

    Also the displacement of the formed by the underside
    of the pisdton is the same as that of the top side of the,

    so even if you do get a higher pressure in the cylinder the excess
    is made up of exhaust not fuel-air mixture.

    > This is one of the
    > reasons that a two-stroke puts out relatively high power per CC compared
    > with a typical four-stroke. (Or at least used to).


    More significant is the fact that it fires twice as often for the same crank
    speed.

    anyway genines with more than 1 cylinder are typically fan scavenged rather
    than crank-case scavenged this means they don't need oil in the fuel

    the big ones also have direct fuel injection which means they don't blow
    fuel out the exhaust.


    Bye.
    Jasen
    jasen, Jan 13, 2007
    #13
  14. jasen Guest

    On 2007-01-13, Don Hills <> wrote:

    > The only 2-stroke diesel engines that I have seen that use crankcase
    > compression are model (aircraft etc) engines.


    they're not really diesel engines

    > There is no free lunch. Supercharging uses power, regardless of the method.
    > The advantage of turbocharging is that it recovers energy that would
    > otherwise have been lost out the exhaust. Done right, it is more efficient
    > (power versus fuel used) than supercharging. Its biggest disadvantage,
    > "turbo lag", which is a nuisance when used for automotive purposes where the
    > power requirement is constantly changing, is not a problem in marine use
    > where the engine maintains constant power for days at a time.


    turbocharging increases the exhaust pressure which does rob energy from the
    engine, but in a two stroke this increased pressure means you can pack more
    mass of air into into the cylinder.

    Bye.
    Jasen
    jasen, Jan 13, 2007
    #14
  15. ~misfit~ Guest

    Don Hills wrote:
    > In article <45a8240d$>,
    > "~misfit~" <> wrote:
    > >
    > > Heh! I don't see it as myself having eaten my foot. I was merely
    > > going by what was available on that page. You can't deny that, on
    > > the face of it, the wheelnut guys were being confusing to say the
    > > least?

    >
    > You know how you don't believe everything you read, especially on the
    > Internet? I would have decided that it failed the common sense test,
    > and done some Googling before posting. But in this case, I'd seen the
    > original site a while ago and had the bookmark already.


    Ahh, foreknowledge is a wonderful thing. :)

    In my original post I was merely trying to point out that they 'wheelnut'
    people may well be idiots as well as plagarists.

    > > Strange that it doesn't use the crankcase in the usual two-stroke
    > > way. That's always been one of the big advantages of two-strokes,
    > > "free" supercharging. I remeber (vaguely) that, back in the 50s (?)
    > > a European (?) motorcycle manufacturer made a two cylinder
    > > two-stroke with both cylinders firing at the same time and a dummy
    > > cylinder (at 90 degrees to the main two IIRC), the sole purpose of
    > > which was to increase the supercharging effect.

    >
    > The only 2-stroke diesel engines that I have seen that use crankcase
    > compression are model (aircraft etc) engines.
    > All the other ones I know of work like this:
    > http://auto.howstuffworks.com/diesel-two-stroke1.htm


    Yeah. I'm not totally familiar with all diesel (or compression-ignition)
    2-strokes other than a few model aircraft engines and stripping and
    re-building a Rootes supercharger and 4 cylinder Detroit Diesel that it was
    bolted to back in the day. (One of my earlier jobs was working in an
    automotive engineering shop (reconditioning engines) so when I started work
    with a road construction firm they tended to get me to do the engine work
    that didn't require contracting out.) Other than that I have little
    first-hand knowledge of 2-stroke diesels or what is the norm.

    > There is no free lunch. Supercharging uses power, regardless of the
    > method. The advantage of turbocharging is that it recovers energy
    > that would otherwise have been lost out the exhaust. Done right, it
    > is more efficient (power versus fuel used) than supercharging.


    Yep, I'm familiar with the pros and cons of super Vs turbo charging.

    > Its
    > biggest disadvantage, "turbo lag", which is a nuisance when used for
    > automotive purposes where the power requirement is constantly
    > changing, is not a problem in marine use where the engine maintains
    > constant power for days at a time.


    Indeed. A turbocharged constant-revving engine is optimal for energy
    efficiency. However, I would have thought that a 4-stroke would be more
    efficient that a 2-stroke. I guess not, what with that extra revolution of
    the crankshaft between firing strokes. Interesting, allbeit OT, thread.

    Cheers,

    --
    Shaun.
    ~misfit~, Jan 13, 2007
    #15
  16. ~misfit~ Guest

    jasen wrote:
    > On 2007-01-12, ~misfit~ <> wrote:
    >
    > > > I don't think the photos are of the same engine. The '12'
    > > > designation on the first photo indicates 12 cylinders
    > > > (typically), and there's 12 sets of widgets along the top.
    > > > Definitely 10 pots in the other photo.

    >
    > > Exactly. A two-stroke (typically) draws the 'charge' first into the
    > > crankcase (when the piston rises) where it is compressed by the
    > > piston coming down. It is then channeled through the transfer ports
    > > into the combustion chamber at higher-than-ambient pressure.

    >
    > while this is happening the exhaust port is open.... that puts a
    > limit on the cylinder pressure.
    >
    > Also the displacement of the formed by the underside
    > of the pisdton is the same as that of the top side of the,


    Good point. That's why I mentioned that odd design I'd seen way back with a
    dummy piston. An early attempt at a type of lateral-thinking supercharging.

    > so even if you do get a higher pressure in the cylinder the excess
    > is made up of exhaust not fuel-air mixture.


    However, at least with a normally-aspirated single cylinder engine, a
    4-stroke has to 'suck' the mixture in, resulting in a mixture that is, at
    least at the start of the compression cycle, at lower than ambient pressure.
    (Therefore less mixture.) A 2-stroke however uses the 'free' drop in
    crankcase pressure (where a 4-stroke is usually vented) to pull in the next
    charge. (Heh. Thinking as I write, which is also at lower than ambient. LOL)


    Also, depending on whether it has an 'expansion chamber' or tuned exhaust
    system, the two-stroke can do better. They can be used to effectively 'drag'
    more mixture through. A way of using 'waste' exhaust energy to improve
    induction that is simpler than turbocharging.

    I used to have this awesome book on the design and construction of tuned
    exhaust systems for 2-stroke engines but, as with most of my books from my
    earlier life, I leant it out and never got it back.

    > > This is one of the
    > > reasons that a two-stroke puts out relatively high power per CC
    > > compared with a typical four-stroke. (Or at least used to).

    >
    > More significant is the fact that it fires twice as often for the
    > same crank speed.


    Yep.

    > anyway genines with more than 1 cylinder are typically fan scavenged
    > rather than crank-case scavenged this means they don't need oil in
    > the fuel


    Really? My Kawasaki H2 750cc 2-stroke triple motorcycle (and my Suzuki 500cc
    twin, can't remember the model off-hand) both seemed to use the familiar
    crankcase scavenge system. Could be wrong, though they both needed oil in
    the fuel, in both these cases metered/mixed by a pump from a separate tank.

    Not to mention all the 2-stroke boat outboard engines I've seen, some with 6
    cylinders.

    > the big ones also have direct fuel injection which means they don't
    > blow fuel out the exhaust.


    Hmmm. Yeah, I know next-to-nil about the big ones. Injection would certainly
    be the way to go though. Most of my first-hand experience is limited to
    model aircraft/bike/car/some earthmoving machine engines around 20 years ago
    and more.

    Cheers,
    --
    Shaun.
    ~misfit~, Jan 13, 2007
    #16
  17. Don Hills Guest

    In article <45a96aaf$>,
    "~misfit~" <> wrote:
    >
    >I used to have this awesome book on the design and construction of tuned
    >exhaust systems for 2-stroke engines but, as with most of my books from my
    >earlier life, I leant it out and never got it back.


    A small, slim paperback? I still have mine somewhere in a crate at the back
    of the library...

    >Really? My Kawasaki H2 750cc 2-stroke triple motorcycle (and my Suzuki 500cc
    >twin, can't remember the model off-hand) both seemed to use the familiar
    >crankcase scavenge system. Could be wrong, though they both needed oil in
    >the fuel, in both these cases metered/mixed by a pump from a separate tank.


    Suzuki 500 Titan. Sounded like "several dozen supercharged bumblebees in an
    empty tin can", according to one memorable review I once read. Every
    Japanese 2-stroke motorcycle I've ever seen has had crankcase induction.
    Most were piston ported into the rear of the crankcase, some (especially
    Kawasaki twins) were reed valve into the side of the crankcase.

    --
    Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    Don Hills, Jan 19, 2007
    #17
  18. Don Hills Guest

    In article <eobg9c$8av$-a-geek.org>, jasen <> wrote:
    >On 2007-01-13, Don Hills <> wrote:
    >
    >> The only 2-stroke diesel engines that I have seen that use crankcase
    >> compression are model (aircraft etc) engines.

    >
    >they're not really diesel engines


    Don't get confused by glowplug engines. There are real diesel engines for
    models. They are easily distinguished visually - glowplug engines have a
    small spark-plug like device screwed into the top of the cylinder (the glow
    plug), whereas diesel engines have a screw with a T-bar for turning it. This
    presses on a movable piston inside the cylinder head. You can adjust the
    compression ratio while the engine is running.

    Here's some examples:
    http://www.eifflaender.com/
    Lots of pictures:
    http://www.eifflaender.com/enginepics.htm


    --
    Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    Don Hills, Jan 19, 2007
    #18
  19. ~misfit~ Guest

    Don Hills wrote:
    > In article <45a96aaf$>,
    > "~misfit~" <> wrote:
    > >
    > > I used to have this awesome book on the design and construction of
    > > tuned exhaust systems for 2-stroke engines but, as with most of my
    > > books from my earlier life, I leant it out and never got it back.

    >
    > A small, slim paperback? I still have mine somewhere in a crate at
    > the back of the library...


    That's the one! Full of equations about wave-speed/pipe diameter/pipe length
    and wave reflections that lower the pressure at the intake end of the
    'tube'.

    > > Really? My Kawasaki H2 750cc 2-stroke triple motorcycle (and my
    > > Suzuki 500cc twin, can't remember the model off-hand) both seemed
    > > to use the familiar crankcase scavenge system. Could be wrong,
    > > though they both needed oil in the fuel, in both these cases
    > > metered/mixed by a pump from a separate tank.

    >
    > Suzuki 500 Titan. Sounded like "several dozen supercharged bumblebees
    > in an empty tin can", according to one memorable review I once read.


    Once again you're correct. Mine blew out one of it's sparkplugs, I think the
    heads were too thin, (It had a "RamAir" cooling system where the fins were
    taller at the front and were 'capped' in an attempt to increase the velocity
    of the air going through the fins in the middle/back of the head). or at
    least not enough thread to hold the plug against the compression as I'd
    heard of others doing it. I had to get a 'heli-coil' fitted, cost me quite a
    bit.

    > Every Japanese 2-stroke motorcycle I've ever seen has had crankcase
    > induction.


    Same.

    > Most were piston ported into the rear of the crankcase,


    Yep.

    > some (especially Kawasaki twins) were reed valve into the side of the
    > crankcase.


    I've never owned a Kawasaki two-stroke twin but I did have a single and it
    had the carby on the side, behind a cover, and, instead of reed-valves, used
    a rotary valve. A big disc of some fiberous material with a 'port' in it
    attached to the crankshaft.

    Cheers,
    --
    Shaun.
    ~misfit~, Jan 20, 2007
    #19
  20. Warwick Guest

    On Sun, 14 Jan 2007 12:30:04 +1300, ~misfit~ wrote:

    > Really? My Kawasaki H2 750cc 2-stroke triple motorcycle (and my Suzuki 500cc
    > twin, can't remember the model off-hand) both seemed to use the familiar
    > crankcase scavenge system. Could be wrong, though they both needed oil in
    > the fuel, in both these cases metered/mixed by a pump from a separate tank.


    Have you still got the H2? I know some people out here in the Hutt who are
    mad on them, despite their propensity for scaring riders shitless. My mate
    Stoney rebuilt Ginger Molloy's old H1 - he came second to Agostini
    (spelling?) in the 1969 500cc GP on it. I have an idea he's given it to
    Southwards since.
    --

    cheers
    Warwick, Jan 21, 2007
    #20
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