Copyright and popular culture

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 23, 2006.

  1. Interesting item from Ars Technica
    <http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20061020-8045.html> about a
    researcher who was trying to track down video items related to a well-known
    incident from 14 years ago. Turns out that the copyright agreements were
    locked down so tight that it was virtually impossible to get copies of the
    items in question.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 23, 2006
    #1
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  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Peter Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > Interesting item from Ars Technica
    > <http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20061020-8045.html> about a
    > researcher who was trying to track down video items related to a
    > well-known incident from 14 years ago. Turns out that the copyright
    > agreements were locked down so tight that it was virtually impossible to
    > get copies of the items in question.


    The book the article refers to (Lawrence Lessig's "Free Culture") is a
    really good read - in fact a must read for anyone interested in freedom and
    innovation.


    Peter
     
    Peter, Oct 23, 2006
    #2
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  3. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    steve Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > Interesting item from Ars Technica
    > <http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20061020-8045.html> about a
    > researcher who was trying to track down video items related to a well-known
    > incident from 14 years ago. Turns out that the copyright agreements were
    > locked down so tight that it was virtually impossible to get copies of the
    > items in question.


    Yes...and this is why people (the "pop" in popular) will resist the
    ownership of culture.

    The harder the "owners" try to defend what is "theirs" the more the
    "pop" will ignore them.
     
    steve, Oct 23, 2006
    #3
  4. Here's an interesting interview
    <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/11/03/peter_jenner/> with Peter Jenner,
    who has managed Pink Floyd among a bunch of other well-known acts. He
    reckons that the major labels have had it and DRM is a waste of time, but
    he's no fan of a free-for-all world where artists don't get paid. Instead,
    he's got some definite ideas about how things can work without imposing
    arbitrary restrictions and pissing off music fans.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Nov 4, 2006
    #4
  5. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Earl Grey Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > Here's an interesting interview
    > <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/11/03/peter_jenner/> with Peter Jenner,
    > who has managed Pink Floyd among a bunch of other well-known acts. He
    > reckons that the major labels have had it and DRM is a waste of time, but
    > he's no fan of a free-for-all world where artists don't get paid. Instead,
    > he's got some definite ideas about how things can work without imposing
    > arbitrary restrictions and pissing off music fans.


    LMFAO
    He managed Pink Floyd 40 years ago !!!
     
    Earl Grey, Nov 4, 2006
    #5
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