Copying photos to CD

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Harriett Wright, Apr 26, 2005.

  1. When I click on "Copy to CD", I get a dialogue box with options: Burn using
    Real Player, Open writable CD folder, Create CD using Roxio Easy CD Creator,
    Burn using Windows Media Player. Do these all work the same, or are there
    advantages in using one over another? I have Windows XP Home Edition.

    Another question: did I buy the right kind of CD's? On the front it says
    "Philips CD-R80 52x" and also says "700 MB"

    Thanks.

    Harriett (new to digital photography)
     
    Harriett Wright, Apr 26, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. "Harriett Wright" <> wrote in message
    news:U2qbe.15137$...
    > When I click on "Copy to CD", I get a dialogue box with options: Burn

    using
    > Real Player, Open writable CD folder, Create CD using Roxio Easy CD

    Creator,
    > Burn using Windows Media Player. Do these all work the same, or are there
    > advantages in using one over another? I have Windows XP Home Edition.



    You have several burner software options available in your system so it
    gives you a choice. I never burn with Real so I have no opinion on that one;
    Roxio will occasionally have problems with the calibration track and some
    brands of CD but if you find one that works it will burn OK (problem is:
    after burning ca 30 seconds or so gives you an error message something like
    "calibration error" or "power calibration error" and then stops the burn
    process - the solution is to use another brand/manufacturer of CD blank);
    Win XP can also use Win Media Player to burn a disk - it has fewer options
    than Roxio but works OK - when no other burn application software is
    installed this is usually the default. You can also burn audio/music CDs
    with Win Media Player with the resulting file extention ".cda"

    The option "Open writable CD folder" in XP is one that gives you the chance
    to select a specific place on the HD to assemble the files to be written -
    thereafter, in XP, you click the folder you created, or within the folder
    some or all of the individual files, and right click the mouse to get a burn
    to CD dialog. A burn to CD option may also appear in the left screen menu if
    you are looking at the folder contents in Windows Explorer. If you use
    Roxio, and perhaps Real?, you should be able to mix and match what goes on
    the disc from anywhere on the HD. Otherwise, XP will, if you just select a
    file and click Burn to CD from any of the Win menus, make a temp folder of
    it's own, somewhere but not necessarily on an obvious place, on the system,
    just as it will do when you use Win Media Player and the right click menu
    item "burn to CD"

    Not only will system ask what to burn with but if there is more than one
    CD/DVD deck installed and available it will also ask which one to use.

    >
    > Another question: did I buy the right kind of CD's? On the front it says
    > "Philips CD-R80 52x" and also says "700 MB"


    Standard values for a CD-R blank. You should be just fine with those.

    NOTES - all image files are "data" so you will be burning a "data" style of
    CD. If you see a question dialog come up on a menu asking what kind of CD
    type you want to create (data; audio; ect) select "data." Lastly, you may
    see options, especially in Roxio, as to the burn scheme - IF you don't care
    too much about preserving the file names the type you should use is
    "ISO9660-1" but the file names will be altered to 8 characters + the 3
    character PC file extention (JPG; TIF; ect) to match the ISO standard name
    convention. An ISO type disk can be opened on the greatest variety of
    computers with various operating systems and vintages and with different
    disk readers including moving data between a PC and a MAC. Other options
    (specifically "Joliet" and "ISO9660-2") may preserve the long file name but
    not be openable on all the computers and operating systems that an ISO9660-1
    disc will. IIRC MACs, in particular, are limited to ca 15 characters in the
    file name and may not open a long file name file created on a PC made disk.

    LASTLY - IMPORTANT - in every case where you have or see the option to
    "close (or finalize) CD" at end of the burn process - select YES or tic the
    box "close CD at end..."! An "open" CD may not be usable by any other
    software and might not be readable on any other than the original computer
    that created it and using ONLY the original software that created it. Once
    "closed" or "finalized" you can not add any more data to that CD.

    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Harriett (new to digital photography)
    >
    >

    This is all part of the learning curve. Hope this gets you going OK.

    Journalist
     
    Journalist-North, Apr 26, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Hi JN,

    Thanks very much for such a prompt and complete reply. I printed it out for
    reference, and forged ahead. BUT -- what on earth is thumbs.db? Every time
    it popped up I just said yes, go ahead and copy it anyway, and it seemed to
    work OK. I did learn, at Circuit City today, that if I want to add more
    pictures to a CD later, I need a different kind, so I bought some CD-RW
    rewritable ones (Memorex is the brand they had).

    Thanks again,
    Harriett

    "Journalist-North" <> wrote in message
    news:t_rbe.31626$...
    >
    > "Harriett Wright" <> wrote in message
    > news:U2qbe.15137$...
    >> When I click on "Copy to CD", I get a dialogue box with options: Burn

    > using
    >> Real Player, Open writable CD folder, Create CD using Roxio Easy CD

    > Creator,
    >> Burn using Windows Media Player. Do these all work the same, or are
    >> there
    >> advantages in using one over another? I have Windows XP Home Edition.

    >
    >
    > You have several burner software options available in your system so it
    > gives you a choice. I never burn with Real so I have no opinion on that
    > one;
    > Roxio will occasionally have problems with the calibration track and some
    > brands of CD but if you find one that works it will burn OK (problem is:
    > after burning ca 30 seconds or so gives you an error message something
    > like
    > "calibration error" or "power calibration error" and then stops the burn
    > process - the solution is to use another brand/manufacturer of CD blank);
    > Win XP can also use Win Media Player to burn a disk - it has fewer options
    > than Roxio but works OK - when no other burn application software is
    > installed this is usually the default. You can also burn audio/music CDs
    > with Win Media Player with the resulting file extention ".cda"
    >
    > The option "Open writable CD folder" in XP is one that gives you the
    > chance
    > to select a specific place on the HD to assemble the files to be written -
    > thereafter, in XP, you click the folder you created, or within the folder
    > some or all of the individual files, and right click the mouse to get a
    > burn
    > to CD dialog. A burn to CD option may also appear in the left screen menu
    > if
    > you are looking at the folder contents in Windows Explorer. If you use
    > Roxio, and perhaps Real?, you should be able to mix and match what goes on
    > the disc from anywhere on the HD. Otherwise, XP will, if you just select a
    > file and click Burn to CD from any of the Win menus, make a temp folder of
    > it's own, somewhere but not necessarily on an obvious place, on the
    > system,
    > just as it will do when you use Win Media Player and the right click menu
    > item "burn to CD"
    >
    > Not only will system ask what to burn with but if there is more than one
    > CD/DVD deck installed and available it will also ask which one to use.
    >
    >>
    >> Another question: did I buy the right kind of CD's? On the front it
    >> says
    >> "Philips CD-R80 52x" and also says "700 MB"

    >
    > Standard values for a CD-R blank. You should be just fine with those.
    >
    > NOTES - all image files are "data" so you will be burning a "data" style
    > of
    > CD. If you see a question dialog come up on a menu asking what kind of CD
    > type you want to create (data; audio; ect) select "data." Lastly, you may
    > see options, especially in Roxio, as to the burn scheme - IF you don't
    > care
    > too much about preserving the file names the type you should use is
    > "ISO9660-1" but the file names will be altered to 8 characters + the 3
    > character PC file extention (JPG; TIF; ect) to match the ISO standard name
    > convention. An ISO type disk can be opened on the greatest variety of
    > computers with various operating systems and vintages and with different
    > disk readers including moving data between a PC and a MAC. Other options
    > (specifically "Joliet" and "ISO9660-2") may preserve the long file name
    > but
    > not be openable on all the computers and operating systems that an
    > ISO9660-1
    > disc will. IIRC MACs, in particular, are limited to ca 15 characters in
    > the
    > file name and may not open a long file name file created on a PC made
    > disk.
    >
    > LASTLY - IMPORTANT - in every case where you have or see the option to
    > "close (or finalize) CD" at end of the burn process - select YES or tic
    > the
    > box "close CD at end..."! An "open" CD may not be usable by any other
    > software and might not be readable on any other than the original computer
    > that created it and using ONLY the original software that created it. Once
    > "closed" or "finalized" you can not add any more data to that CD.
    >
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >> Harriett (new to digital photography)
    >>
    >>

    > This is all part of the learning curve. Hope this gets you going OK.
    >
    > Journalist
    >
    >
     
    Harriett Wright, Apr 27, 2005
    #3
  4. Harriett Wright

    Ron Recer Guest

    Be careful using CD-RWs for storage of data you want to keep. My expierence
    with them has been that they are unstable and often become unreadable. By
    the way I have had more problems with Memorex then with other brands I have
    used.

    In the past I would copy images from my CF card to my hard drive and then
    copy the images to a CD-RW before erasing the CF card. Once I had enough
    images to fill a CD-R, I would burn two copies and erase the CD-RW. In my
    case the RW was only needed if the HD went down and it was usually only a
    mater of a couple of days before I burned the CD-Rs.

    Now I use a external HD instead of a CD-RW. Having the images on two HDs is
    safer, in my opinion, than having them on one HD and a CD-RW. When I
    accumulate several hundred images I burn to CR-Rs and always make a copies.

    Ron

    "Harriett Wright" <> wrote in message
    news:GYBbe.13394$...
    > Hi JN,
    >
    > Thanks very much for such a prompt and complete reply. I printed it out

    for
    > reference, and forged ahead. BUT -- what on earth is thumbs.db? Every

    time
    > it popped up I just said yes, go ahead and copy it anyway, and it seemed

    to
    > work OK. I did learn, at Circuit City today, that if I want to add more
    > pictures to a CD later, I need a different kind, so I bought some CD-RW
    > rewritable ones (Memorex is the brand they had).
    >
    > Thanks again,
    > Harriett
    >
    > "Journalist-North" <> wrote in message
    > news:t_rbe.31626$...
    > >
    > > "Harriett Wright" <> wrote in message
    > > news:U2qbe.15137$...
    > >> When I click on "Copy to CD", I get a dialogue box with options: Burn

    > > using
    > >> Real Player, Open writable CD folder, Create CD using Roxio Easy CD

    > > Creator,
    > >> Burn using Windows Media Player. Do these all work the same, or are
    > >> there
    > >> advantages in using one over another? I have Windows XP Home Edition.

    > >
    > >
    > > You have several burner software options available in your system so it
    > > gives you a choice. I never burn with Real so I have no opinion on that
    > > one;
    > > Roxio will occasionally have problems with the calibration track and

    some
    > > brands of CD but if you find one that works it will burn OK (problem is:
    > > after burning ca 30 seconds or so gives you an error message something
    > > like
    > > "calibration error" or "power calibration error" and then stops the burn
    > > process - the solution is to use another brand/manufacturer of CD

    blank);
    > > Win XP can also use Win Media Player to burn a disk - it has fewer

    options
    > > than Roxio but works OK - when no other burn application software is
    > > installed this is usually the default. You can also burn audio/music CDs
    > > with Win Media Player with the resulting file extention ".cda"
    > >
    > > The option "Open writable CD folder" in XP is one that gives you the
    > > chance
    > > to select a specific place on the HD to assemble the files to be

    written -
    > > thereafter, in XP, you click the folder you created, or within the

    folder
    > > some or all of the individual files, and right click the mouse to get a
    > > burn
    > > to CD dialog. A burn to CD option may also appear in the left screen

    menu
    > > if
    > > you are looking at the folder contents in Windows Explorer. If you use
    > > Roxio, and perhaps Real?, you should be able to mix and match what goes

    on
    > > the disc from anywhere on the HD. Otherwise, XP will, if you just select

    a
    > > file and click Burn to CD from any of the Win menus, make a temp folder

    of
    > > it's own, somewhere but not necessarily on an obvious place, on the
    > > system,
    > > just as it will do when you use Win Media Player and the right click

    menu
    > > item "burn to CD"
    > >
    > > Not only will system ask what to burn with but if there is more than one
    > > CD/DVD deck installed and available it will also ask which one to use.
    > >
    > >>
    > >> Another question: did I buy the right kind of CD's? On the front it
    > >> says
    > >> "Philips CD-R80 52x" and also says "700 MB"

    > >
    > > Standard values for a CD-R blank. You should be just fine with those.
    > >
    > > NOTES - all image files are "data" so you will be burning a "data" style
    > > of
    > > CD. If you see a question dialog come up on a menu asking what kind of

    CD
    > > type you want to create (data; audio; ect) select "data." Lastly, you

    may
    > > see options, especially in Roxio, as to the burn scheme - IF you don't
    > > care
    > > too much about preserving the file names the type you should use is
    > > "ISO9660-1" but the file names will be altered to 8 characters + the 3
    > > character PC file extention (JPG; TIF; ect) to match the ISO standard

    name
    > > convention. An ISO type disk can be opened on the greatest variety of
    > > computers with various operating systems and vintages and with different
    > > disk readers including moving data between a PC and a MAC. Other options
    > > (specifically "Joliet" and "ISO9660-2") may preserve the long file name
    > > but
    > > not be openable on all the computers and operating systems that an
    > > ISO9660-1
    > > disc will. IIRC MACs, in particular, are limited to ca 15 characters in
    > > the
    > > file name and may not open a long file name file created on a PC made
    > > disk.
    > >
    > > LASTLY - IMPORTANT - in every case where you have or see the option to
    > > "close (or finalize) CD" at end of the burn process - select YES or tic
    > > the
    > > box "close CD at end..."! An "open" CD may not be usable by any other
    > > software and might not be readable on any other than the original

    computer
    > > that created it and using ONLY the original software that created it.

    Once
    > > "closed" or "finalized" you can not add any more data to that CD.
    > >
    > >>
    > >> Thanks.
    > >>
    > >> Harriett (new to digital photography)
    > >>
    > >>

    > > This is all part of the learning curve. Hope this gets you going OK.
    > >
    > > Journalist
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Ron Recer, Apr 27, 2005
    #4
  5. Thanks for the warning, Ron. I don't usually take a whole lot of pictures,
    so it would take me a while to accumulate enough to fill a CD. How safe
    would it be to accumulate them on my one gigabite CF card for about a month,
    then upload them to my hard drive and copy them to a CD-R. That's what I'll
    have to do when I travel, which is when I take the most pictures anyway.

    Harriett


    "Ron Recer" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Be careful using CD-RWs for storage of data you want to keep. My
    > expierence
    > with them has been that they are unstable and often become unreadable. By
    > the way I have had more problems with Memorex then with other brands I
    > have
    > used.
    >
    > In the past I would copy images from my CF card to my hard drive and then
    > copy the images to a CD-RW before erasing the CF card. Once I had enough
    > images to fill a CD-R, I would burn two copies and erase the CD-RW. In my
    > case the RW was only needed if the HD went down and it was usually only a
    > mater of a couple of days before I burned the CD-Rs.
    >
    > Now I use a external HD instead of a CD-RW. Having the images on two HDs
    > is
    > safer, in my opinion, than having them on one HD and a CD-RW. When I
    > accumulate several hundred images I burn to CR-Rs and always make a
    > copies.
    >
    > Ron
     
    Harriett Wright, Apr 27, 2005
    #5
  6. Harriett Wright

    measekite Guest

    I do the same. I use Dantz Retrospect to automatically back up to a
    second HD every night. You have a good plan.

    Ron Recer wrote:

    >Be careful using CD-RWs for storage of data you want to keep. My expierence
    >with them has been that they are unstable and often become unreadable. By
    >the way I have had more problems with Memorex then with other brands I have
    >used.
    >
    >In the past I would copy images from my CF card to my hard drive and then
    >copy the images to a CD-RW before erasing the CF card. Once I had enough
    >images to fill a CD-R, I would burn two copies and erase the CD-RW. In my
    >case the RW was only needed if the HD went down and it was usually only a
    >mater of a couple of days before I burned the CD-Rs.
    >
    >Now I use a external HD instead of a CD-RW. Having the images on two HDs is
    >safer, in my opinion, than having them on one HD and a CD-RW. When I
    >accumulate several hundred images I burn to CR-Rs and always make a copies.
    >
    >Ron
    >
    >"Harriett Wright" <> wrote in message
    >news:GYBbe.13394$...
    >
    >
    >>Hi JN,
    >>
    >>Thanks very much for such a prompt and complete reply. I printed it out
    >>
    >>

    >for
    >
    >
    >>reference, and forged ahead. BUT -- what on earth is thumbs.db? Every
    >>
    >>

    >time
    >
    >
    >>it popped up I just said yes, go ahead and copy it anyway, and it seemed
    >>
    >>

    >to
    >
    >
    >>work OK. I did learn, at Circuit City today, that if I want to add more
    >>pictures to a CD later, I need a different kind, so I bought some CD-RW
    >>rewritable ones (Memorex is the brand they had).
    >>
    >>Thanks again,
    >>Harriett
    >>
    >>"Journalist-North" <> wrote in message
    >>news:t_rbe.31626$...
    >>
    >>
    >>>"Harriett Wright" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:U2qbe.15137$...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>When I click on "Copy to CD", I get a dialogue box with options: Burn
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>using
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Real Player, Open writable CD folder, Create CD using Roxio Easy CD
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>Creator,
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Burn using Windows Media Player. Do these all work the same, or are
    >>>>there
    >>>>advantages in using one over another? I have Windows XP Home Edition.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>You have several burner software options available in your system so it
    >>>gives you a choice. I never burn with Real so I have no opinion on that
    >>>one;
    >>>Roxio will occasionally have problems with the calibration track and
    >>>
    >>>

    >some
    >
    >
    >>>brands of CD but if you find one that works it will burn OK (problem is:
    >>>after burning ca 30 seconds or so gives you an error message something
    >>>like
    >>>"calibration error" or "power calibration error" and then stops the burn
    >>>process - the solution is to use another brand/manufacturer of CD
    >>>
    >>>

    >blank);
    >
    >
    >>>Win XP can also use Win Media Player to burn a disk - it has fewer
    >>>
    >>>

    >options
    >
    >
    >>>than Roxio but works OK - when no other burn application software is
    >>>installed this is usually the default. You can also burn audio/music CDs
    >>>with Win Media Player with the resulting file extention ".cda"
    >>>
    >>>The option "Open writable CD folder" in XP is one that gives you the
    >>>chance
    >>>to select a specific place on the HD to assemble the files to be
    >>>
    >>>

    >written -
    >
    >
    >>>thereafter, in XP, you click the folder you created, or within the
    >>>
    >>>

    >folder
    >
    >
    >>>some or all of the individual files, and right click the mouse to get a
    >>>burn
    >>>to CD dialog. A burn to CD option may also appear in the left screen
    >>>
    >>>

    >menu
    >
    >
    >>>if
    >>>you are looking at the folder contents in Windows Explorer. If you use
    >>>Roxio, and perhaps Real?, you should be able to mix and match what goes
    >>>
    >>>

    >on
    >
    >
    >>>the disc from anywhere on the HD. Otherwise, XP will, if you just select
    >>>
    >>>

    >a
    >
    >
    >>>file and click Burn to CD from any of the Win menus, make a temp folder
    >>>
    >>>

    >of
    >
    >
    >>>it's own, somewhere but not necessarily on an obvious place, on the
    >>>system,
    >>>just as it will do when you use Win Media Player and the right click
    >>>
    >>>

    >menu
    >
    >
    >>>item "burn to CD"
    >>>
    >>>Not only will system ask what to burn with but if there is more than one
    >>>CD/DVD deck installed and available it will also ask which one to use.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Another question: did I buy the right kind of CD's? On the front it
    >>>>says
    >>>>"Philips CD-R80 52x" and also says "700 MB"
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>Standard values for a CD-R blank. You should be just fine with those.
    >>>
    >>>NOTES - all image files are "data" so you will be burning a "data" style
    >>>of
    >>>CD. If you see a question dialog come up on a menu asking what kind of
    >>>
    >>>

    >CD
    >
    >
    >>>type you want to create (data; audio; ect) select "data." Lastly, you
    >>>
    >>>

    >may
    >
    >
    >>>see options, especially in Roxio, as to the burn scheme - IF you don't
    >>>care
    >>>too much about preserving the file names the type you should use is
    >>>"ISO9660-1" but the file names will be altered to 8 characters + the 3
    >>>character PC file extention (JPG; TIF; ect) to match the ISO standard
    >>>
    >>>

    >name
    >
    >
    >>>convention. An ISO type disk can be opened on the greatest variety of
    >>>computers with various operating systems and vintages and with different
    >>>disk readers including moving data between a PC and a MAC. Other options
    >>>(specifically "Joliet" and "ISO9660-2") may preserve the long file name
    >>>but
    >>>not be openable on all the computers and operating systems that an
    >>>ISO9660-1
    >>>disc will. IIRC MACs, in particular, are limited to ca 15 characters in
    >>>the
    >>>file name and may not open a long file name file created on a PC made
    >>>disk.
    >>>
    >>>LASTLY - IMPORTANT - in every case where you have or see the option to
    >>>"close (or finalize) CD" at end of the burn process - select YES or tic
    >>>the
    >>>box "close CD at end..."! An "open" CD may not be usable by any other
    >>>software and might not be readable on any other than the original
    >>>
    >>>

    >computer
    >
    >
    >>>that created it and using ONLY the original software that created it.
    >>>
    >>>

    >Once
    >
    >
    >>>"closed" or "finalized" you can not add any more data to that CD.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Thanks.
    >>>>
    >>>>Harriett (new to digital photography)
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>This is all part of the learning curve. Hope this gets you going OK.
    >>>
    >>>Journalist
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    measekite, Apr 27, 2005
    #6
  7. Harriett Wright wrote:
    > Hi JN,
    >
    > Thanks very much for such a prompt and complete reply. I printed it
    > out for reference, and forged ahead. BUT -- what on earth is
    > thumbs.db?


    As I recall, it's where the thumbnails are stored if you have view a
    folder in Windows XP in Thumbnail view.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Apr 27, 2005
    #7
  8. Harriett Wright

    Ron Recer Guest

    I take almost all of my photos when we are traveling. Since we travel with
    our 5th wheel RV I can dump my CF card images to the two HDs every night and
    that is what I do. All digital storage cards will fail, all HDs will fail,
    all CDs and DVDs will fail. It is just a matter of when. The more copies
    you have of your images (within reason) the better your chances that you
    will be able to read and use a given image file. When the images are still
    on the CF card and no where else there is always the possibility that the
    card will die and you will lose the images. The probability isn't real high
    that your CF card will go bad over the next week or two, but why take the
    chance if you have an opportunity to copy the image files to a HD.

    I recently copied 14,000+ digital images from CDs to DVDs. None of the CDs
    were more than 4 years old and all had been "successfully" burned according
    to the software. At the time I burned the CDs I made two copies of all but
    the first few which were burned almost four years ago. Sure enough on one
    CD, where I had no duplicate, a couple of files were corrupt and could not
    be copied. They were not important images, but they could have been. Now I
    want to keep two or three copies of everything.

    Ron

    "Harriett Wright" <> wrote in message
    news:gDDbe.15520$...
    > Thanks for the warning, Ron. I don't usually take a whole lot of

    pictures,
    > so it would take me a while to accumulate enough to fill a CD. How safe
    > would it be to accumulate them on my one gigabite CF card for about a

    month,
    > then upload them to my hard drive and copy them to a CD-R. That's what

    I'll
    > have to do when I travel, which is when I take the most pictures anyway.
    >
    > Harriett
    >
    >
    > "Ron Recer" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Be careful using CD-RWs for storage of data you want to keep. My
    > > expierence
    > > with them has been that they are unstable and often become unreadable.

    By
    > > the way I have had more problems with Memorex then with other brands I
    > > have
    > > used.
    > >
    > > In the past I would copy images from my CF card to my hard drive and

    then
    > > copy the images to a CD-RW before erasing the CF card. Once I had

    enough
    > > images to fill a CD-R, I would burn two copies and erase the CD-RW. In

    my
    > > case the RW was only needed if the HD went down and it was usually only

    a
    > > mater of a couple of days before I burned the CD-Rs.
    > >
    > > Now I use a external HD instead of a CD-RW. Having the images on two

    HDs
    > > is
    > > safer, in my opinion, than having them on one HD and a CD-RW. When I
    > > accumulate several hundred images I burn to CR-Rs and always make a
    > > copies.
    > >
    > > Ron

    >
    >
     
    Ron Recer, Apr 27, 2005
    #8
  9. Harriett Wright

    ASAAR Guest

    On Wed, 27 Apr 2005 01:32:22 GMT, Harriett Wright wrote:

    > I did learn, at Circuit City today, that if I want to add more
    > pictures to a CD later, I need a different kind, so I bought some CD-RW
    > rewritable ones (Memorex is the brand they had).


    No, that's incorrect. I frequently add more pictures to regular
    CD-R discs when I have more of them to archive. CD-RW discs can be
    used the same way, but when CD-R discs are full, you can't use them
    anymore. CD-RW discs on the other hand, can be erased and reused,
    so they might be better for filling a disc with audio files to be
    used with a portable CD player. When you tire of those songs a week
    or month later, you can reformat the disc and copy a new set of
    files to it. For archiving pictures, the cheaper CD-R discs are
    better, since most people don't intend to delete their old pictures,
    and if they've been saved on CD-RW media, unintentional accidents
    can happen.
     
    ASAAR, Apr 27, 2005
    #9
  10. Harriett Wright

    Ron Hunter Guest

    ASAAR wrote:
    > On Wed, 27 Apr 2005 01:32:22 GMT, Harriett Wright wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I did learn, at Circuit City today, that if I want to add more
    >>pictures to a CD later, I need a different kind, so I bought some CD-RW
    >>rewritable ones (Memorex is the brand they had).

    >
    >
    > No, that's incorrect. I frequently add more pictures to regular
    > CD-R discs when I have more of them to archive. CD-RW discs can be
    > used the same way, but when CD-R discs are full, you can't use them
    > anymore. CD-RW discs on the other hand, can be erased and reused,
    > so they might be better for filling a disc with audio files to be
    > used with a portable CD player. When you tire of those songs a week
    > or month later, you can reformat the disc and copy a new set of
    > files to it. For archiving pictures, the cheaper CD-R discs are
    > better, since most people don't intend to delete their old pictures,
    > and if they've been saved on CD-RW media, unintentional accidents
    > can happen.
    >

    Some older CD writers weren't 'multi-session', thus you couldn't add
    data to the CD.


    --
    Ron Hunter
     
    Ron Hunter, Apr 28, 2005
    #10
  11. Ron Hunter <> wrote:
    : ASAAR wrote:
    : > No, that's incorrect. I frequently add more pictures to regular
    : > CD-R discs when I have more of them to archive. CD-RW discs can be
    : > used the same way, but when CD-R discs are full, you can't use them
    : > anymore. CD-RW discs on the other hand, can be erased and reused,
    : > so they might be better for filling a disc with audio files to be
    : > used with a portable CD player. When you tire of those songs a week
    : > or month later, you can reformat the disc and copy a new set of
    : > files to it. For archiving pictures, the cheaper CD-R discs are
    : > better, since most people don't intend to delete their old pictures,
    : > and if they've been saved on CD-RW media, unintentional accidents
    : > can happen.
    : >
    : Some older CD writers weren't 'multi-session', thus you couldn't add
    : data to the CD.

    But you can still find a good use for these RWs in such a case. Use the
    RWs to compile the disk over time and sort the images into various sub
    folders and when the disk is full (or nearly so) you can then copy the RW
    to a R in one session. Depending on your set up this may work best to
    copy the RW to your hard drive and then write the R in one session. Many
    CD burning software will do this itself, but the process is still the
    same.

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, Apr 28, 2005
    #11
  12. My thanks to everyone in this group who helped fill some of the gaps in my
    meager knowledge. I'm strictly a recreational photographer -- mostly
    parties, holiday gatherings, and vacation trips, but I don't want to lose
    any of those memories. You've given me enough information so that I can
    devise a plan to safeguard them.

    Harriett
     
    Harriett Wright, Apr 28, 2005
    #12
  13. Harriett Wright

    ASAAR Guest

    On Thu, 28 Apr 2005 02:11:30 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:

    > Some older CD writers weren't 'multi-session', thus you couldn't add
    > data to the CD.


    Your statement is literally correct but wasn't very helpful if it
    was intended to help solve Harriet's problem. The last time I had a
    CD drive that wasn't multisession was when almost most were single
    or double speed drives, required a card with a proprietary interface
    (before they IDE versions became common), and wouldn't know what to
    do with a CD-RW disc. I'd be amazed it her CD writer isn't
    multi-session capable. Non-multisession CD burners aren't often
    seen in computers running Windows XP Home Edition, which was
    mentioned in the OP. There may be a few of those ancient burners
    still living in some DOS, Win3x and a few old Linux boxes. :)
     
    ASAAR, Apr 28, 2005
    #13
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