Copying files with Windows 7

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Matty F, Oct 23, 2010.

  1. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    How do I back up files to an external hard drive or flash drive and
    make those files available to anybody? Like I used to with Win98 and
    XP.
    Windows 7 wants to copy the name of the person doing the copying
    (which isn't me) as "permission entries" to all the folders and
    files. When I "Remove" that "name", that disallows access by anybody.

    And where does Win7 get that "name" from?
    "Name" has three parts to it: Name1 (Name2\Name3)
    Name1 is the name of the user logged in, I think
    Name2 appears tobe the name of the computer.
    What is Name3 and where does it come from and how is it changed?
    The names were all set up in the shop where the computer from bought
    from, and they are wrong.
    Matty F, Oct 23, 2010
    #1
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  2. Matty F

    Richard Guest

    On 24/10/2010 9:06 a.m., Matty F wrote:
    > How do I back up files to an external hard drive or flash drive and
    > make those files available to anybody? Like I used to with Win98 and
    > XP.
    > Windows 7 wants to copy the name of the person doing the copying
    > (which isn't me) as "permission entries" to all the folders and
    > files. When I "Remove" that "name", that disallows access by anybody.
    >
    > And where does Win7 get that "name" from?
    > "Name" has three parts to it: Name1 (Name2\Name3)
    > Name1 is the name of the user logged in, I think
    > Name2 appears tobe the name of the computer.
    > What is Name3 and where does it come from and how is it changed?
    > The names were all set up in the shop where the computer from bought
    > from, and they are wrong.


    Name3 will be the username.

    If you make a folder and give everyone access to it, by adding everyone
    with all the options ticked, then what you copy should be available to
    everyone.
    Richard, Oct 24, 2010
    #2
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  3. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    On Oct 24, 10:40 pm, Richard <> wrote:
    > On 24/10/2010 9:06 a.m., Matty F wrote:
    >
    > > How do I back up files to an external hard drive or flash drive and
    > > make those files available to anybody? Like I used to with Win98 and
    > > XP.
    > > Windows 7 wants to copy the name of the person doing the copying
    > > (which isn't me) as "permission entries" to all the folders and
    > > files. When I "Remove" that "name", that disallows access by anybody.

    >
    > > And where does Win7 get that "name" from?
    > > "Name" has three parts to it: Name1 (Name2\Name3)
    > > Name1 is the name of the user logged in, I think
    > > Name2 appears tobe the name of the computer.
    > > What is Name3 and where does it come from and how is it changed?
    > > The names were all set up in the shop where the computer from bought
    > > from, and they are wrong.

    >
    > Name3 will be the username.


    And in what magic place may I change the username? I assure you that I
    have tried very hard to do that. I have to drive some distance every
    few days to try any new suggestions,so any help is welcome.

    > If you make a folder and give everyone access to it, by adding everyone
    > with all the options ticked, then what you copy should be available to
    > everyone.


    Is "everyone" a keyword for Win7? I tried that and it didn't seem to
    work. I also tried removing password protection but it wouldn't let
    me.
    Why can't the Win7 security defaults be the same as XP, and people can
    add whatever paranoid protection they might want, later.
    Matty F, Oct 24, 2010
    #3
  4. Matty F

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Sun, 24 Oct 2010 03:04:21 -0700, Matty F wrote:

    > Is "everyone" a keyword for Win7? I tried that and it didn't seem to
    > work. I also tried removing password protection but it wouldn't let me.
    > Why can't the Win7 security defaults be the same as XP, and people can
    > add whatever paranoid protection they might want, later.


    Alternatively, change the file system from NTFS to FAT32.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 24, 2010
    #4
  5. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    On Oct 25, 3:46 am, Sweetpea <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 24 Oct 2010 03:04:21 -0700, Matty F wrote:
    > > Is "everyone" a keyword for Win7? I tried that and it didn't seem to
    > > work. I also tried removing password protection but it wouldn't let me.
    > > Why can't the Win7 security defaults be the same as XP, and people can
    > > add whatever paranoid protection they might want, later.

    >
    > Alternatively, change the file system from NTFS to FAT32.


    The external hard drive is already formatted and has lots of files on
    it.
    I assume that means the file system can't be changed.
    Matty F, Oct 24, 2010
    #5
  6. Matty F

    Richard Guest

    On 25/10/2010 3:46 a.m., Sweetpea wrote:
    > On Sun, 24 Oct 2010 03:04:21 -0700, Matty F wrote:
    >
    >> Is "everyone" a keyword for Win7? I tried that and it didn't seem to
    >> work. I also tried removing password protection but it wouldn't let me.
    >> Why can't the Win7 security defaults be the same as XP, and people can
    >> add whatever paranoid protection they might want, later.

    >
    > Alternatively, change the file system from NTFS to FAT32.


    And put the entire contents at risk of an unclean disconnection, and
    limit yourself to small files? No thanks.
    Richard, Oct 25, 2010
    #6
  7. Matty F

    Gordon Guest

    On 2010-10-23, Matty F <> wrote:
    > How do I back up files to an external hard drive or flash drive and
    > make those files available to anybody? Like I used to with Win98 and
    > XP.
    > Windows 7 wants to copy the name of the person doing the copying
    > (which isn't me) as "permission entries" to all the folders and
    > files. When I "Remove" that "name", that disallows access by anybody.
    >
    > And where does Win7 get that "name" from?
    > "Name" has three parts to it: Name1 (Name2\Name3)
    > Name1 is the name of the user logged in, I think
    > Name2 appears tobe the name of the computer.
    > What is Name3 and where does it come from and how is it changed?
    > The names were all set up in the shop where the computer from bought
    > from, and they are wrong.


    Ms Penguin here. Oh good, my best friend Ms Windows is getting with
    permissions. File wise.

    Study the file permission whic *nix has had for 40+ years and Ms Windows has
    only stated employing.

    Get root/admin access, and you have the *total* control of your machine.

    See in Linix the command chmod issued by root does what I often waht it to.
    Gordon, Oct 25, 2010
    #7
  8. Matty F

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Mon, 25 Oct 2010 16:36:28 +1300, Richard wrote:

    > On 25/10/2010 3:46 a.m., Sweetpea wrote:
    >> On Sun, 24 Oct 2010 03:04:21 -0700, Matty F wrote:
    >>
    >>> Is "everyone" a keyword for Win7? I tried that and it didn't seem to
    >>> work. I also tried removing password protection but it wouldn't let
    >>> me. Why can't the Win7 security defaults be the same as XP, and people
    >>> can add whatever paranoid protection they might want, later.

    >>
    >> Alternatively, change the file system from NTFS to FAT32.

    >
    > And put the entire contents at risk of an unclean disconnection, and
    > limit yourself to small files? No thanks.


    How often do you need to have files larger than 4gigs on a portable means
    of sharing files?


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 25, 2010
    #8
  9. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    On Oct 25, 5:10 pm, Gordon <> wrote:

    > Get root/admin access, and you have the *total* control of your machine.


    The Win7 PC that I used to write the files on the external hard drive
    will never again be used to access that drive.
    Other computers with a variety of operating systems will do so.
    I want to remove all access control from the external hard drive.
    Does nobody actually know how to do that?
    Since I am unfamiliar with Windows 7 I need to know where to start.
    Matty F, Oct 25, 2010
    #9
  10. Matty F

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Mon, 25 Oct 2010 02:36:45 -0700, Matty F wrote:

    > The Win7 PC that I used to write the files on the external hard drive
    > will never again be used to access that drive. Other computers with a
    > variety of operating systems will do so. I want to remove all access
    > control from the external hard drive. Does nobody actually know how to
    > do that? Since I am unfamiliar with Windows 7 I need to know where to
    > start.


    In this context you'll therefore need to reformat the external HDD using
    the FAT32 file system as that is the only file system that is accessible
    from all versions of MS WindowsNT, Win98, Win95, all distributions of
    Linux, MacOS X.x, and all modern variants of Unix.

    NTFS is not usable on MacOS, and probably not usable on Unix, and
    certainly not usable on Win98 & Win95.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 25, 2010
    #10
  11. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    On Oct 26, 9:13 am, Sweetpea <> wrote:
    > On Mon, 25 Oct 2010 02:36:45 -0700, Matty F wrote:
    > > The Win7 PC that I used to write the files on the external hard drive
    > > will never again be used to access that drive. Other computers with a
    > > variety of operating systems will do so. I want to remove all access
    > > control from the external hard drive. Does nobody actually know how to
    > > do that? Since I am unfamiliar with Windows 7 I need to know where to
    > > start.

    >
    > In this context you'll therefore need to reformat the external HDD using
    > the FAT32 file system as that is the only file system that is accessible
    > from all versions of MS WindowsNT, Win98, Win95, all distributions of
    > Linux, MacOS X.x, and all modern variants of Unix.
    >
    > NTFS is not usable on MacOS, and probably not usable on Unix, and
    > certainly not usable on Win98 & Win95.


    The external hard drive is to be used by someone with Windows XP.
    It's not really important for the other operating systems that you
    mention. The files are a backup of my files. If I need them I can get
    them back with XP or Win7.
    Matty F, Oct 26, 2010
    #11
  12. Matty F

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Mon, 25 Oct 2010 22:31:12 -0700, Matty F wrote:

    > On Oct 26, 9:13 am, Sweetpea <> wrote:
    >> On Mon, 25 Oct 2010 02:36:45 -0700, Matty F wrote:
    >> > The Win7 PC that I used to write the files on the external hard drive
    >> > will never again be used to access that drive. Other computers with a
    >> > variety of operating systems will do so.

    >>
    >> In this context you'll therefore need to reformat the external HDD
    >> using the FAT32 file system as that is the only file system that is
    >> accessible from all versions of MS WindowsNT, Win98, Win95, all
    >> distributions of Linux, MacOS X.x, and all modern variants of Unix.
    >>
    >> NTFS is not usable on MacOS, and probably not usable on Unix, and
    >> certainly not usable on Win98 & Win95.

    >
    > The external hard drive is to be used by someone with Windows XP.


    You said "Other computers" - plural - "with a variety of operating
    systems" will be accessing that external HDD.

    Shifting goal posts???


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 26, 2010
    #12
  13. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    On Oct 26, 9:23 pm, Sweetpea <> wrote:
    > On Mon, 25 Oct 2010 22:31:12 -0700, Matty F wrote:
    > > On Oct 26, 9:13 am, Sweetpea <> wrote:
    > >> On Mon, 25 Oct 2010 02:36:45 -0700, Matty F wrote:
    > >> > The Win7 PC that I used to write the files on the external hard drive
    > >> > will never again be used to access that drive. Other computers with a
    > >> > variety of operating systems will do so.

    >
    > >> In this context you'll therefore need to reformat the external HDD
    > >> using the FAT32 file system as that is the only file system that is
    > >> accessible from all versions of MS WindowsNT, Win98, Win95, all
    > >> distributions of Linux, MacOS X.x, and all modern variants of Unix.

    >
    > >> NTFS is not usable on MacOS, and probably not usable on Unix, and
    > >> certainly not usable on Win98 & Win95.

    >
    > > The external hard drive is to be used by someone with Windows XP.

    >
    > You said "Other computers" - plural - "with a variety of operating
    > systems" will be accessing that external HDD.
    >
    > Shifting goal posts???


    I hadn't thought of the possibility of the hard drive being formatted
    for NTFS. It's not mine and can't be changed. I have my own external
    hard drive that seems to work fine with Win98SE and Windows 7. In my
    ignorance I thought there was one useful standard for removable
    drives.
    Matty F, Oct 26, 2010
    #13
  14. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    On Oct 25, 10:32 pm, EMB <> wrote:
    > On 24/10/2010 11:04 p.m., Matty F wrote:
    >
    > > And in what magic place may I change the username? I assure you that I
    > > have tried very hard to do that. I have to drive some distance every
    > > few days to try any new suggestions,so any help is welcome.

    >
    > >> If you make a folder and give everyone access to it, by adding everyone
    > >> with all the options ticked, then what you copy should be available to
    > >> everyone.

    >
    > > Is "everyone" a keyword for Win7? I tried that and it didn't seem to
    > > work. I also tried removing password protection but it wouldn't let
    > > me.
    > > Why can't the Win7 security defaults be the same as XP, and people can
    > > add whatever paranoid protection they might want, later.

    >
    > FFS Matty, it's not rocket science and with your alleged background
    > shouldn't be giving you problems (or you could google it). Try right
    > clicking on the folder, choosing properties and then having a look at
    > the security tab. From there F1 should offer enough direction for you
    > to work it out if you can't cope on your own.


    I've tried all that for hours. Windows 7 doesn't work the way I think
    it should. I suspect that you have missed one part of what I am
    attempting to do.
    Matty F, Oct 26, 2010
    #14
  15. Matty F

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Tue, 26 Oct 2010 13:12:40 -0700, Matty F wrote:

    > I hadn't thought of the possibility of the hard drive being formatted
    > for NTFS. It's not mine and can't be changed. I have my own external
    > hard drive that seems to work fine with Win98SE and Windows 7. In my
    > ignorance I thought there was one useful standard for removable drives.


    External HDDs are by default formatted with NTFS these days. The
    packaging advises that it needs to be reformatted if it is to be used
    with MacOS.

    Win98 (first or second version) only works with HDDs formatted with the
    FAT32 file system.

    WinNT (all versions including WinNT6.1) can work with HDDs formatted with
    FAT32 or with NTFS.

    MacOS does not work with NTFS.

    Most versions of Unix don't work with NTFS.

    Linux has recently added NTFS, but it is not recommended as a default
    file system.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 27, 2010
    #15
  16. Matty F

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Tue, 26 Oct 2010 13:12:40 -0700, Matty F wrote:

    > In my ignorance
    > I thought there was one useful standard for removable drives.


    I think that standard is called "USB". :)


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 27, 2010
    #16
  17. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    On Oct 27, 2:50 pm, Sweetpea <> wrote:

    > External HDDs are by default formatted with NTFS these days. The
    > packaging advises that it needs to be reformatted if it is to be used
    > with MacOS.


    OK I give up. I shall erase all the files that I have put on the
    external drive.
    It seems that I cannot trust what Microsoft will do with their
    software these days.
    Matty F, Oct 27, 2010
    #17
  18. Matty F

    Richard Guest

    On 27/10/2010 8:16 p.m., Matty F wrote:
    > On Oct 27, 2:50 pm, Sweetpea<> wrote:
    >
    >> External HDDs are by default formatted with NTFS these days. The
    >> packaging advises that it needs to be reformatted if it is to be used
    >> with MacOS.

    >
    > OK I give up. I shall erase all the files that I have put on the
    > external drive.
    > It seems that I cannot trust what Microsoft will do with their
    > software these days.


    Drives will normally ship as NTFS as that is the most commonly needed
    file system, with a tool on them to reformat for mac, since macs can
    read ntfs by default.

    Formatting fat32 is not advisable under any circumstances.

    Right click the ext drive, properties, security tab, edit, add, type
    everyone or browse for it, tick full control, ok out of it all.

    Then you can remove all the other users if you want to, since they will
    just show as a guid on other installs which dont know about your machine.

    whats hard about that?

    all the preformatted ext drives I have got seem to have come set with
    everyone and nothing else in permissions. If you format yourself it will
    default to the local administrators and power users group I think but I
    am not reformatting a drive to test that.
    Richard, Oct 27, 2010
    #18
  19. Matty F

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Wed, 27 Oct 2010 23:23:17 +1300, Richard wrote:

    > Formatting fat32 is not advisable under any circumstances.


    ....unless it needs to be readable by MS Windows boxes (rather than MS
    WindowsNT boxes), or by a mixture of Windows and *nix boxes.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 27, 2010
    #19
  20. Matty F

    Richard Guest

    On 28/10/2010 12:04 a.m., Sweetpea wrote:
    > On Wed, 27 Oct 2010 23:23:17 +1300, Richard wrote:
    >
    >> Formatting fat32 is not advisable under any circumstances.

    >
    > ...unless it needs to be readable by MS Windows boxes (rather than MS
    > WindowsNT boxes), or by a mixture of Windows and *nix boxes.


    In which case the drive would most likly not be getting used to backup
    files from a windows 7 machine, and who the hell still has old windows
    machines anyway?

    last linux install I had was not having any problems reading and writing
    to NTFS, perhaps the others that you use need to progress with their
    default settings?
    Richard, Oct 27, 2010
    #20
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