Converting my PAL & NTSC videos & Hi8 CamCorder tapes to DVD

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Joe Smith, Sep 1, 2003.

  1. Joe Smith

    Joe Smith Guest

    I am interested in converting all my PAL & NTSC videos & Hi8 CamCorder tapes to
    DVD.

    What is the best way to go at price range of $100-$400:
    1. PC video capture card
    2. DVDR
    3. Digital Camcorder with analog video/audio input connected to PC?

    Specifications:
    1. (RCA) Analog video input PAL + NTSC, and S-Video too,
    2. High quality video capture (full frame size for each of PAL & NTSC, and
    maximal number of frame per second) using DVD quality & method of compression
    (on the fly, i.e. real-time)
    3. High quality stereo audio capture
    4. Stable hardware and software (if PC based solution) for video capturing and
    video editing (I heard some cards completely screwed up some folks PCs)

    Currently I have 800MHz Pentium 3 PC, with 100GByte HD, having USB1. So I can
    either use internal card, or add USB2 or Firewire card if needed.

    I appreciate your concise and clear recommendation/suggestion/warning.

    Thanks,
    JS
     
    Joe Smith, Sep 1, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. "Joe Smith" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am interested in converting all my PAL & NTSC videos & Hi8 CamCorder

    tapes to
    > DVD.
    >
    > What is the best way to go at price range of $100-$400:
    > 1. PC video capture card
    > 2. DVDR
    > 3. Digital Camcorder with analog video/audio input connected to PC?
    >
    > Specifications:
    > 1. (RCA) Analog video input PAL + NTSC, and S-Video too,
    > 2. High quality video capture (full frame size for each of PAL & NTSC, and
    > maximal number of frame per second) using DVD quality & method of

    compression
    > (on the fly, i.e. real-time)
    > 3. High quality stereo audio capture
    > 4. Stable hardware and software (if PC based solution) for video capturing

    and
    > video editing (I heard some cards completely screwed up some folks PCs)
    >
    > Currently I have 800MHz Pentium 3 PC, with 100GByte HD, having USB1. So I

    can
    > either use internal card, or add USB2 or Firewire card if needed.
    >
    > I appreciate your concise and clear recommendation/suggestion/warning.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > JS


    I have an ATI All-In-Wonder Radeon. You can buy them for US$37 nowadays.
    It has composite and S-video input and output, and it has hardware MPEG
    encoding, so it can capture full-frame video (NTSC, anyway) easily.

    I used to use it on a 900MHz Athlon machine. 800MHz PIII might be a little
    too slow... or might not.

    Mine came with Ulead VideoStudio 4 "lite" edition, but I have now upgraded
    to version 7, and that is very easy to use to make DVDs.

    However, use the capture software that comes with whatever card you buy.
    It will take best advantage of the hardware. Once you have video captured,
    any good mastering software should let you make DVDs.

    Chris
     
    Chris Schumann, Sep 1, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. The Ati AIW Radeon does not use hardware encoding for creating Mpeg2 files,
    it does have a very good software encoder in the MMC though.

    When I had one it failed to capture full DVD spec video with a 1.2 Duron, so
    I'm doubtful But I always had to re-encode the video to author it to CD at
    the time or DVD recently.

    DVD MovieStudio 2 does not take MMC's Mpeg2 O/P.

    > I have an ATI All-In-Wonder Radeon. You can buy them for US$37 nowadays.
    > It has composite and S-video input and output, and it has hardware MPEG
    > encoding, so it can capture full-frame video (NTSC, anyway) easily.
    >
    > I used to use it on a 900MHz Athlon machine. 800MHz PIII might be a little
    > too slow... or might not.
    >
    > Mine came with Ulead VideoStudio 4 "lite" edition, but I have now upgraded
    > to version 7, and that is very easy to use to make DVDs.
    >
    > However, use the capture software that comes with whatever card you buy.
    > It will take best advantage of the hardware. Once you have video captured,
    > any good mastering software should let you make DVDs.
     
    Alan Shepherd, Sep 2, 2003
    #3
  4. Joe Smith

    Blofelds Cat Guest

    Don't know what standalone DVD recorders go for in your part of the
    world but it is my considered opinion that a DVD +RW Recorder
    (preferably of the Philips variety), recording at SP setting, is the
    simplest and fastest method of getting your tapes onto DVD as it's all
    done in real time.

    Capturing, encoding and authoring takes a F#$%ing long time to
    achieve; and to get results that the experts among the group
    readership get takes a lot of trial and error as there is no 1 perfect
    method for all.

    Buy a DVD +RW recorder, connect your camera or vcr into it, pop a +RW
    or +R disc into the deck and hit the tit and in the duration of your
    tape you'll have a useable DVD.

    With a PC-based DVD +RW drive and the right software (e.g. Nero 6),
    you can take the disc from the standalone and add your own menu's,
    chapter points, even edit bits out that you no longer want on the
    disc.

    Okay, you don't have the utter control over the disc as you would via
    the capture, encode, author method but you'll save yourself WEEKS if
    you've got a shitload of tapes to transfer.

    I've got capacity to produce DVD's both by standalone and the
    CAPENCAUTH methods and I go for standalone when it's a huge job like
    you have ahead of you. Perhaps if the source material was DV or
    Digital Hi-8, I might suggest otherwise but if it's VHS and Hi8, go
    standalone.

    Right, that was the easy bit. Now for the abuse...

    Blofelds Cat

    On Mon, 01 Sep 2003 05:35:47 GMT, Joe Smith
    <> wrote:

    >I am interested in converting all my PAL & NTSC videos & Hi8 CamCorder tapes to
    >DVD.
    >
    >What is the best way to go at price range of $100-$400:
    >1. PC video capture card
    >2. DVDR
    >3. Digital Camcorder with analog video/audio input connected to PC?
    >
    >Specifications:
    >1. (RCA) Analog video input PAL + NTSC, and S-Video too,
    >2. High quality video capture (full frame size for each of PAL & NTSC, and
    >maximal number of frame per second) using DVD quality & method of compression
    >(on the fly, i.e. real-time)
    >3. High quality stereo audio capture
    >4. Stable hardware and software (if PC based solution) for video capturing and
    >video editing (I heard some cards completely screwed up some folks PCs)
    >
    >Currently I have 800MHz Pentium 3 PC, with 100GByte HD, having USB1. So I can
    >either use internal card, or add USB2 or Firewire card if needed.
    >
    >I appreciate your concise and clear recommendation/suggestion/warning.
    >
    >Thanks,
    >JS
     
    Blofelds Cat, Sep 3, 2003
    #4
  5. "Alan Shepherd" <> wrote in message
    news:rUQ4b.2838$...
    > The Ati AIW Radeon does not use hardware encoding for creating Mpeg2

    files,
    > it does have a very good software encoder in the MMC though.
    >
    > When I had one it failed to capture full DVD spec video with a 1.2 Duron,

    so
    > I'm doubtful But I always had to re-encode the video to author it to CD at
    > the time or DVD recently.
    >
    > DVD MovieStudio 2 does not take MMC's Mpeg2 O/P.


    I'm shocked!

    But now that I think about it, if it did have hardware compression, it would
    be hard to justify why it takes 60% of the CPU on my 1.7GHz P4 when
    recording.

    I use 6kbps and record full 720x480, interlaced and frame-based and never
    drop a frame if I leave it alone.

    I never dropped frames on my 900MHz Athlon either, but that was before I had
    a DVD burner, so I just captured at VCD "quality" settings.

    I would think a Duron could do the job... but then again, the MMC might be
    optimized for P4.

    I stand corrected.

    Chris

    and too bad about DVD MovieStudio 2.
     
    Chris Schumann, Sep 3, 2003
    #5
  6. Sorry - the MMC probably is not P4 optimised, but since it makes VERY heavy
    use of the FPU and matrix operations it makes massive use of cache
    operations. The Duron is the slow coach here, but the Duron is a good CPU
    with a decent FPU unit. And it never managed to capture DVD resolution
    without dropped frames, I tried, 640 x 480 was the limit.

    But Ati's MMC was excellent, and quality wise it was superb, except that
    TmpGenc would not takes it version of Mpeg2 output......

    > > The Ati AIW Radeon does not use hardware encoding for creating Mpeg2

    > files,
    > > it does have a very good software encoder in the MMC though.
    > >
    > > When I had one it failed to capture full DVD spec video with a 1.2

    Duron,
    > so
    > > I'm doubtful But I always had to re-encode the video to author it to CD

    at
    > > the time or DVD recently.
    > >
    > > DVD MovieStudio 2 does not take MMC's Mpeg2 O/P.

    >
    > I'm shocked!
    >
    > But now that I think about it, if it did have hardware compression, it

    would
    > be hard to justify why it takes 60% of the CPU on my 1.7GHz P4 when
    > recording.
    >
    > I use 6kbps and record full 720x480, interlaced and frame-based and never
    > drop a frame if I leave it alone.
    >
    > I never dropped frames on my 900MHz Athlon either, but that was before I

    had
    > a DVD burner, so I just captured at VCD "quality" settings.
    >
    > I would think a Duron could do the job... but then again, the MMC might be
    > optimized for P4.
    >
    > I stand corrected.
    >
    > Chris
    >
    > and too bad about DVD MovieStudio 2.
     
    Alan Shepherd, Sep 4, 2003
    #6
  7. Joe Smith

    Daburner Guest

    Not bad advice, as I've realized recently. I upgraded to Pinnacle's Studio
    Deluxe 8 with DV/AD capture card. I found it to be superior in every way to
    Ati's AIW capture as it uses hardware to render rather than software. Your
    job is similar to mine in that you have a lot of video tape to transfer over
    to DVD. I've tested out the capture, edit, render and burn vs. recording via
    the Panasonic E50 stand alone and I gotta tell you, that is the only way to
    go right now. I'm using a PIII 1Ghz with 512/pc 133 sdram and it takes about
    4 hours to render a 1 hour avi file to mpeg2. Its way easier to record in
    real time with the Panny. BTW, I use DVD-R, which is the format most
    compatible with the current DVD players on the market.

    Hopefully that last comment doesn't start a flame war.

    Raven


    "Blofelds Cat" <nospam@myplacethanks> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Don't know what standalone DVD recorders go for in your part of the
    > world but it is my considered opinion that a DVD +RW Recorder
    > (preferably of the Philips variety), recording at SP setting, is the
    > simplest and fastest method of getting your tapes onto DVD as it's all
    > done in real time.
    >
    > Capturing, encoding and authoring takes a F#$%ing long time to
    > achieve; and to get results that the experts among the group
    > readership get takes a lot of trial and error as there is no 1 perfect
    > method for all.
    >
    > Buy a DVD +RW recorder, connect your camera or vcr into it, pop a +RW
    > or +R disc into the deck and hit the tit and in the duration of your
    > tape you'll have a useable DVD.
    >
    > With a PC-based DVD +RW drive and the right software (e.g. Nero 6),
    > you can take the disc from the standalone and add your own menu's,
    > chapter points, even edit bits out that you no longer want on the
    > disc.
    >
    > Okay, you don't have the utter control over the disc as you would via
    > the capture, encode, author method but you'll save yourself WEEKS if
    > you've got a shitload of tapes to transfer.
    >
    > I've got capacity to produce DVD's both by standalone and the
    > CAPENCAUTH methods and I go for standalone when it's a huge job like
    > you have ahead of you. Perhaps if the source material was DV or
    > Digital Hi-8, I might suggest otherwise but if it's VHS and Hi8, go
    > standalone.
    >
    > Right, that was the easy bit. Now for the abuse...
    >
    > Blofelds Cat
    >
    > On Mon, 01 Sep 2003 05:35:47 GMT, Joe Smith
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >I am interested in converting all my PAL & NTSC videos & Hi8 CamCorder

    tapes to
    > >DVD.
    > >
    > >What is the best way to go at price range of $100-$400:
    > >1. PC video capture card
    > >2. DVDR
    > >3. Digital Camcorder with analog video/audio input connected to PC?
    > >
    > >Specifications:
    > >1. (RCA) Analog video input PAL + NTSC, and S-Video too,
    > >2. High quality video capture (full frame size for each of PAL & NTSC,

    and
    > >maximal number of frame per second) using DVD quality & method of

    compression
    > >(on the fly, i.e. real-time)
    > >3. High quality stereo audio capture
    > >4. Stable hardware and software (if PC based solution) for video

    capturing and
    > >video editing (I heard some cards completely screwed up some folks PCs)
    > >
    > >Currently I have 800MHz Pentium 3 PC, with 100GByte HD, having USB1. So

    I can
    > >either use internal card, or add USB2 or Firewire card if needed.
    > >
    > >I appreciate your concise and clear recommendation/suggestion/warning.
    > >
    > >Thanks,
    > >JS

    >
     
    Daburner, Sep 5, 2003
    #7
  8. Joe Smith

    David Guest

    I'm using my Sony TRV-70
    I leave out the DV tape then play the VHS or LD into the camera and then
    take it's output via Firewire on to my HD !

    I get Mpeg in real time!

    "Daburner" <> wrote in message
    news:eYV5b.20797$...
    > Not bad advice, as I've realized recently. I upgraded to Pinnacle's Studio
    > Deluxe 8 with DV/AD capture card. I found it to be superior in every way

    to
    > Ati's AIW capture as it uses hardware to render rather than software. Your
    > job is similar to mine in that you have a lot of video tape to transfer

    over
    > to DVD. I've tested out the capture, edit, render and burn vs. recording

    via
    > the Panasonic E50 stand alone and I gotta tell you, that is the only way

    to
    > go right now. I'm using a PIII 1Ghz with 512/pc 133 sdram and it takes

    about
    > 4 hours to render a 1 hour avi file to mpeg2. Its way easier to record in
    > real time with the Panny. BTW, I use DVD-R, which is the format most
    > compatible with the current DVD players on the market.
    >
    > Hopefully that last comment doesn't start a flame war.
    >
    > Raven
    >
    >
    > "Blofelds Cat" <nospam@myplacethanks> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Don't know what standalone DVD recorders go for in your part of the
    > > world but it is my considered opinion that a DVD +RW Recorder
    > > (preferably of the Philips variety), recording at SP setting, is the
    > > simplest and fastest method of getting your tapes onto DVD as it's all
    > > done in real time.
    > >
    > > Capturing, encoding and authoring takes a F#$%ing long time to
    > > achieve; and to get results that the experts among the group
    > > readership get takes a lot of trial and error as there is no 1 perfect
    > > method for all.
    > >
    > > Buy a DVD +RW recorder, connect your camera or vcr into it, pop a +RW
    > > or +R disc into the deck and hit the tit and in the duration of your
    > > tape you'll have a useable DVD.
    > >
    > > With a PC-based DVD +RW drive and the right software (e.g. Nero 6),
    > > you can take the disc from the standalone and add your own menu's,
    > > chapter points, even edit bits out that you no longer want on the
    > > disc.
    > >
    > > Okay, you don't have the utter control over the disc as you would via
    > > the capture, encode, author method but you'll save yourself WEEKS if
    > > you've got a shitload of tapes to transfer.
    > >
    > > I've got capacity to produce DVD's both by standalone and the
    > > CAPENCAUTH methods and I go for standalone when it's a huge job like
    > > you have ahead of you. Perhaps if the source material was DV or
    > > Digital Hi-8, I might suggest otherwise but if it's VHS and Hi8, go
    > > standalone.
    > >
    > > Right, that was the easy bit. Now for the abuse...
    > >
    > > Blofelds Cat
    > >
    > > On Mon, 01 Sep 2003 05:35:47 GMT, Joe Smith
    > > <> wrote:
    > >
    > > >I am interested in converting all my PAL & NTSC videos & Hi8 CamCorder

    > tapes to
    > > >DVD.
    > > >
    > > >What is the best way to go at price range of $100-$400:
    > > >1. PC video capture card
    > > >2. DVDR
    > > >3. Digital Camcorder with analog video/audio input connected to PC?
    > > >
    > > >Specifications:
    > > >1. (RCA) Analog video input PAL + NTSC, and S-Video too,
    > > >2. High quality video capture (full frame size for each of PAL & NTSC,

    > and
    > > >maximal number of frame per second) using DVD quality & method of

    > compression
    > > >(on the fly, i.e. real-time)
    > > >3. High quality stereo audio capture
    > > >4. Stable hardware and software (if PC based solution) for video

    > capturing and
    > > >video editing (I heard some cards completely screwed up some folks PCs)
    > > >
    > > >Currently I have 800MHz Pentium 3 PC, with 100GByte HD, having USB1.

    So
    > I can
    > > >either use internal card, or add USB2 or Firewire card if needed.
    > > >
    > > >I appreciate your concise and clear recommendation/suggestion/warning.
    > > >
    > > >Thanks,
    > > >JS

    > >

    >
    >
     
    David, Sep 7, 2003
    #8
  9. On Sat, 6 Sep 2003 21:38:41 -0400, "David" <>
    wrote:

    >I'm using my Sony TRV-70
    >I leave out the DV tape then play the VHS or LD into the camera and then
    >take it's output via Firewire on to my HD !
    >
    >I get Mpeg in real time!
    >
    >"Daburner" <> wrote in message
    >news:eYV5b.20797$...
    >> Not bad advice, as I've realized recently. I upgraded to Pinnacle's Studio
    >> Deluxe 8 with DV/AD capture card. I found it to be superior in every way

    >to
    >> Ati's AIW capture as it uses hardware to render rather than software. Your
    >> job is similar to mine in that you have a lot of video tape to transfer

    >over
    >> to DVD. I've tested out the capture, edit, render and burn vs. recording

    >via
    >> the Panasonic E50 stand alone and I gotta tell you, that is the only way

    >to
    >> go right now. I'm using a PIII 1Ghz with 512/pc 133 sdram and it takes

    >about
    >> 4 hours to render a 1 hour avi file to mpeg2. Its way easier to record in
    >> real time with the Panny. BTW, I use DVD-R, which is the format most
    >> compatible with the current DVD players on the market.
    >>
    >> Hopefully that last comment doesn't start a flame war.
    >>


    Only to people who can not accept dvdrhelp's extensive database. Of
    course in these peoples minds their experience with 5 drives makes
    them even more of an authority.


    1624 machines compatible withDVD-R
    1182 machines compatible with DVD+R

    And I will not even mention PC's where the gap seems even wider.

    I have a dual format burner so the truth is easier for me to stomach.




    >> Raven
    >>
    >>
    >> "Blofelds Cat" <nospam@myplacethanks> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > Don't know what standalone DVD recorders go for in your part of the
    >> > world but it is my considered opinion that a DVD +RW Recorder
    >> > (preferably of the Philips variety), recording at SP setting, is the
    >> > simplest and fastest method of getting your tapes onto DVD as it's all
    >> > done in real time.
    >> >
    >> > Capturing, encoding and authoring takes a F#$%ing long time to
    >> > achieve; and to get results that the experts among the group
    >> > readership get takes a lot of trial and error as there is no 1 perfect
    >> > method for all.
    >> >
    >> > Buy a DVD +RW recorder, connect your camera or vcr into it, pop a +RW
    >> > or +R disc into the deck and hit the tit and in the duration of your
    >> > tape you'll have a useable DVD.
    >> >
    >> > With a PC-based DVD +RW drive and the right software (e.g. Nero 6),
    >> > you can take the disc from the standalone and add your own menu's,
    >> > chapter points, even edit bits out that you no longer want on the
    >> > disc.
    >> >
    >> > Okay, you don't have the utter control over the disc as you would via
    >> > the capture, encode, author method but you'll save yourself WEEKS if
    >> > you've got a shitload of tapes to transfer.
    >> >
    >> > I've got capacity to produce DVD's both by standalone and the
    >> > CAPENCAUTH methods and I go for standalone when it's a huge job like
    >> > you have ahead of you. Perhaps if the source material was DV or
    >> > Digital Hi-8, I might suggest otherwise but if it's VHS and Hi8, go
    >> > standalone.
    >> >
    >> > Right, that was the easy bit. Now for the abuse...
    >> >
    >> > Blofelds Cat
    >> >
    >> > On Mon, 01 Sep 2003 05:35:47 GMT, Joe Smith
    >> > <> wrote:
    >> >
    >> > >I am interested in converting all my PAL & NTSC videos & Hi8 CamCorder

    >> tapes to
    >> > >DVD.
    >> > >
    >> > >What is the best way to go at price range of $100-$400:
    >> > >1. PC video capture card
    >> > >2. DVDR
    >> > >3. Digital Camcorder with analog video/audio input connected to PC?
    >> > >
    >> > >Specifications:
    >> > >1. (RCA) Analog video input PAL + NTSC, and S-Video too,
    >> > >2. High quality video capture (full frame size for each of PAL & NTSC,

    >> and
    >> > >maximal number of frame per second) using DVD quality & method of

    >> compression
    >> > >(on the fly, i.e. real-time)
    >> > >3. High quality stereo audio capture
    >> > >4. Stable hardware and software (if PC based solution) for video

    >> capturing and
    >> > >video editing (I heard some cards completely screwed up some folks PCs)
    >> > >
    >> > >Currently I have 800MHz Pentium 3 PC, with 100GByte HD, having USB1.

    >So
    >> I can
    >> > >either use internal card, or add USB2 or Firewire card if needed.
    >> > >
    >> > >I appreciate your concise and clear recommendation/suggestion/warning.
    >> > >
    >> > >Thanks,
    >> > >JS
    >> >

    >>
    >>

    >
     
    H E Pennypacker, Sep 8, 2003
    #9
    1. Advertising

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