converting 35mm slides to digital format

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by B.Allingham@gmail.com, Jul 15, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I'm trying to find the best way to scan my collection of thousands of
    35mm slides into digital format. Most of the affordable scanners that
    I've found will do 40-50 at a time. It would be great if there was one
    that would accept an entire carousel, as is. Anyone know of the best
    way to accomplish my task without breaking the bank?
    , Jul 15, 2006
    #1
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  2. John Bean Guest

    On 15 Jul 2006 08:12:00 -0700, wrote:

    >I'm trying to find the best way to scan my collection of thousands of
    >35mm slides into digital format. Most of the affordable scanners that
    >I've found will do 40-50 at a time. It would be great if there was one
    >that would accept an entire carousel, as is. Anyone know of the best
    >way to accomplish my task without breaking the bank?


    Depends how big the bank is :)

    The Braun Slide Scan 4000 takes all kinds of projector
    magazines, including of course carousels.

    --
    John Bean
    John Bean, Jul 15, 2006
    #2
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  3. Roger' Guest

    On 15 Jul 2006 08:12:00 -0700, wrote:

    >I'm trying to find the best way to scan my collection of thousands of
    >35mm slides into digital format. Most of the affordable scanners that
    >I've found will do 40-50 at a time. It would be great if there was one
    >that would accept an entire carousel, as is. Anyone know of the best
    >way to accomplish my task without breaking the bank?


    What you are proposing is not a simple task even if you already had a
    good scanner. http://www.rogerhalstead.com/scanning.htm may help a bit
    in the decision making process, but not selecting a specific scanner.
    Myself, I use the Nikon LS-5000 ED and have gone through some where
    around 30,000 slides and negatives now. That is one horrendous
    storage requirement and a *lot* of DVDs or almost unbelieveable number
    of CDs as you are looking at 68 to near 140 megs per image.

    You still need a naming convention, hard drive storage, back up, and
    archival storage that you can find. Then you still need a reliable
    and safe method for storage of the original negatives and slides.

    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com
    Roger
    Roger', Jul 16, 2006
    #3
  4. tomm42 Guest

    John Bean wrote:
    > On 15 Jul 2006 08:12:00 -0700, wrote:
    >
    > >I'm trying to find the best way to scan my collection of thousands of
    > >35mm slides into digital format. Most of the affordable scanners that
    > >I've found will do 40-50 at a time. It would be great if there was one
    > >that would accept an entire carousel, as is. Anyone know of the best
    > >way to accomplish my task without breaking the bank?

    >
    > Depends how big the bank is :)
    >
    > The Braun Slide Scan 4000 takes all kinds of projector
    > magazines, including of course carousels.
    >
    > --
    > John Bean


    Problem is that the Braun Slide Scan 4000 doesn't take Kodak Carousel
    tray, they take Braun trays which are different. If you have a lot of
    cardboard mounted slides, the Nikon stack loader has problems un less
    the cardboard mounts are pristine.
    You should edit your slides anyway, excellent, good and the rest. The
    rest catagory should go in the waist basket, I know that is difficult
    (you don't see me throwing out a bunch of slides). Also make decsisions
    with your "legacy" in mind relatives and children may want something to
    remember. Your excellent slides can be scanned either at high res
    4000ppi or at 8x10 res (about 3000ppi) you have to decide weather you
    want 16 bit (easier to edit, but needs a top end editor) or 8 bit. The
    good pile gets scanned at max of 8x10. Of course I'm assuming that you
    may want to print some of these, if the fate of the pics is screen
    viewing only, a much lower res can be used say 1200ppi 8 bit and save
    as jpeg. This will speed up the scanning but greatly narrow the
    printing possibilities.
    The scanner I'm liking right now is the Epson V700, close to the Nikon
    in overall sharpness and better dynamic range (better in shadows). At
    $550 or so it is a bargain, will only do 12 slides at a time but that
    is a manageable load, 50 or 100 can be problematical having high RAM
    requirements.
    Good luck with your project.

    Tom
    tomm42, Jul 16, 2006
    #4
  5. no_name Guest

    wrote:

    > I'm trying to find the best way to scan my collection of thousands of
    > 35mm slides into digital format. Most of the affordable scanners that
    > I've found will do 40-50 at a time. It would be great if there was one
    > that would accept an entire carousel, as is. Anyone know of the best
    > way to accomplish my task without breaking the bank?
    >


    Slides are already an archival format. Why not do a real thorough
    inventory & catalog and only scan when you need a specific slide or
    group of slides converted to digital?
    no_name, Jul 18, 2006
    #5
  6. mark Guest

    "no_name" <> wrote in message
    news:WGUug.10625$...
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I'm trying to find the best way to scan my collection of thousands of
    >> 35mm slides into digital format. Most of the affordable scanners that
    >> I've found will do 40-50 at a time. It would be great if there was one
    >> that would accept an entire carousel, as is. Anyone know of the best
    >> way to accomplish my task without breaking the bank?
    >>

    >
    > Slides are already an archival format. Why not do a real thorough
    > inventory & catalog and only scan when you need a specific slide or group
    > of slides converted to digital?


    Depends on what kind of slide. If its Kodachrome I agree its archival.
    Earlier types of other slides are most certainly not by my standards.
    Scanning them before the color fades is very important.
    mark, Jul 18, 2006
    #6
  7. mark <> wrote:
    >
    > Depends on what kind of slide. If its Kodachrome I agree its archival.
    > Earlier types of other slides are most certainly not by my standards.
    > Scanning them before the color fades is very important.
    >


    I am not sure of the archival life of the Fuji Films (I think Velvia is rather
    low), but I know that the Kodak Ektachromes are indicated for more than 70
    years. That is likely longer than I will care ... but perhaps the next
    generation (I am currently enjoying some of my Grandfather's slides).

    --
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Key Fingerprint: 2DB9 813F F510 82C2 E1AE 34D0 D69D 1EDC D5EC AED1
    Thomas T. Veldhouse, Jul 18, 2006
    #7
  8. Neil Ellwood Guest

    On Tue, 18 Jul 2006 09:31:48 -0500, Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:

    > mark <> wrote:
    >>
    >> Depends on what kind of slide. If its Kodachrome I agree its archival.
    >> Earlier types of other slides are most certainly not by my standards.
    >> Scanning them before the color fades is very important.
    >>

    >
    > I am not sure of the archival life of the Fuji Films (I think Velvia is rather
    > low), but I know that the Kodak Ektachromes are indicated for more than 70
    > years. That is likely longer than I will care ... but perhaps the next
    > generation (I am currently enjoying some of my Grandfather's slides).

    I have some ferrania slides that I took and processed around 1961 that are
    still good, the processing solutions were from the published formulae but
    I stopped using ferrania when 3M bought them out and ruined the film (they
    uprated the film, changed the solutions and increased the processin temp.).

    --
    Neil
    Delete l to reply
    Neil Ellwood, Jul 18, 2006
    #8
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