converting 35 mm slides to digital images

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by LeighWillaston, Jun 1, 2007.

  1. I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I want t
    transfer to digital images.

    On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very tim
    consuming.

    I have a 35 mm carousel projector, and wonder whether I can photograp
    each image as I project it onto a white surface.

    Has anyone else done this, and are there some factors I need to tak
    into consideration, such as size of projected image, setting of digita
    camera, etc.


    --
    LeighWillaston
     
    LeighWillaston, Jun 1, 2007
    #1
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  2. LeighWillaston

    GregS Guest

    In article <>, LeighWillaston <> wrote:
    >
    >I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I want to
    >transfer to digital images.
    >
    >On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very time
    >consuming.
    >
    >I have a 35 mm carousel projector, and wonder whether I can photograph
    >each image as I project it onto a white surface.
    >
    >Has anyone else done this, and are there some factors I need to take
    >into consideration, such as size of projected image, setting of digital
    >camera, etc.?


    I did this with 8mm movies, except onto video tape. You may need to
    compensate for color error. Most are using a tungston lamp, but
    might not be too bad. I think you should have good luck. Converting
    my slides to digital were not all that impressive. You gain contrast.
    Clarity should be decent if you use autofocus on the projector and
    use a tripod, and fix your cameras focus.

    greg
     
    GregS, Jun 1, 2007
    #2
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  3. LeighWillaston

    HEMI-Powered Guest

    LeighWillaston offered these thoughts for the group's
    consideration of the matter at hand:

    > I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I
    > want to transfer to digital images.
    >
    > On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very
    > time consuming.
    >
    > I have a 35 mm carousel projector, and wonder whether I can
    > photograph each image as I project it onto a white surface.
    >
    > Has anyone else done this, and are there some factors I need
    > to take into consideration, such as size of projected image,
    > setting of digital camera, etc.?
    >

    I have tried this and it does work. Whether the quality is good
    enough for you depends on your expecations. Consider that your
    camera likely had a very good lens but a slide projector has a
    relatively poor lens which is optimized for brightness and a flat
    "subject", the slide. As to your questions, not knowing much
    about the subjects on your slides or their condition, it is
    difficult to say anything meaningful other than, experiment with
    a typical set of them and see what works best for you.

    Also, investigate local or mail-away slide scanning services.
    Ritz Camera does this as does CVS Pharmacy (of all people!), and
    I suspect many other places do as well. Prices tend to start at
    75 cents/slide and can get to $1.50 or $2.00 in my
    investigations. If you decide this is a solution for you,
    consider a couple of "gotchas": one is that you'll be sending
    away irreplaceable slides, so I would go slowly. The other is
    that the scanning service may create digital images that you feel
    are too light or too dark, or have a color shift. If you see the
    latter in your test scans, tell the service what you want. The
    better ones will allow you to specify general alterations to the
    general setup they use.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry
     
    HEMI-Powered, Jun 1, 2007
    #3
  4. LeighWillaston

    MG Guest

    > I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I want to
    > transfer to digital images.
    >
    > On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very time
    > consuming.
    >
    > I have a 35 mm carousel projector, and wonder whether I can photograph
    > each image as I project it onto a white surface.
    >
    > Has anyone else done this, and are there some factors I need to take
    > into consideration, such as size of projected image, setting of digital
    > camera, etc.?



    This is what I did.
    MG
     
    MG, Jun 1, 2007
    #4
  5. LeighWillaston

    MG Guest

    > I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I want to
    > transfer to digital images.
    >
    > On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very time
    > consuming.
    >
    > I have a 35 mm carousel projector, and wonder whether I can photograph
    > each image as I project it onto a white surface.
    >
    > Has anyone else done this, and are there some factors I need to take
    > into consideration, such as size of projected image, setting of digital
    > camera, etc.?



    This is what I did
    http://users.iafrica.com/m/mc/mcollett/brsd/index.htm

    MG
    (Sorry, forgot URL first time around)
     
    MG, Jun 1, 2007
    #5
  6. "MG" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >> I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I want to
    >> transfer to digital images.
    >>
    >> On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very time
    >> consuming.
    >>
    >> I have a 35 mm carousel projector, and wonder whether I can photograph
    >> each image as I project it onto a white surface.
    >>
    >> Has anyone else done this, and are there some factors I need to take
    >> into consideration, such as size of projected image, setting of digital
    >> camera, etc.?

    >
    >
    > This is what I did
    > http://users.iafrica.com/m/mc/mcollett/brsd/index.htm
    >
    > MG
    > (Sorry, forgot URL first time around)


    I have more than a thousand 35 MM slides that have been sitting in metal
    boxes since the early 1950's. I have tried scanning them, and find they are
    not nearly good enough for me to waste the time of trying to edit them into
    a presentable digital photo after 50 years. It didn't help that I tried to
    take a digital shot when they were projected on a screen. Maybe a camera
    shop might do better, but I would have them convert 2 or 3 photos to see the
    quality of the resulting digital photo.

    RCN
     
    Robert Nabors, Jun 1, 2007
    #6
  7. LeighWillaston

    MarkW Guest

    On Jun 1, 4:11 am, LeighWillaston
    <> wrote:
    > I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I want to
    > transfer to digital images.
    >
    > On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very time
    > consuming.
    >
    > I have a 35 mm carousel projector, and wonder whether I can photograph
    > each image as I project it onto a white surface.
    >
    > Has anyone else done this, and are there some factors I need to take
    > into consideration, such as size of projected image, setting of digital
    > camera, etc.?
    >


    I've done that with 8mm movies as well, and have also scanned old
    family photo albums with a digital camera (I've also scanned many
    years worth of 35mm negatives using a film scanner -- with a good
    negative, the results are very good, but it's quite time-consuming).
    I think the slide projector method is an excellent idea in that once
    you get things set up, it should be many, many times faster than using
    a flatbed or dedicated film scanner. Use your lowest ISO setting (and
    a tripod if necessary). Obviously make sure both the camera and
    projector focus are spot on (preferably put the camera in manual focus
    mode, so you don't have the possibility of random focus misses as you
    go). And experiment with the white balance (or shoot raw and post-
    process). And if you see particular images that are especially worthy
    of more careful treatment, make a note of those as you go and then use
    a film scanner or scanning service on only those.

    Mark
     
    MarkW, Jun 1, 2007
    #7
  8. LeighWillaston

    HEMI-Powered Guest

    Robert Nabors offered these thoughts for the group's
    consideration of the matter at hand:

    > I have more than a thousand 35 MM slides that have been
    > sitting in metal boxes since the early 1950's. I have tried
    > scanning them, and find they are not nearly good enough for me
    > to waste the time of trying to edit them into a presentable
    > digital photo after 50 years. It didn't help that I tried to
    > take a digital shot when they were projected on a screen.
    > Maybe a camera shop might do better, but I would have them
    > convert 2 or 3 photos to see the quality of the resulting
    > digital photo.
    >

    I've got an estiamted 5,000+ Kodachrome and Ektachrome slides in
    Kodak Carousel trays sitting in my basement. Most are of Europe
    taken while on various leaves and passes while I was in West
    Germany with the U.S. Army. The rest are vacation pictures until
    I gave up 35mm film in favor of home video when my daughter was
    small. They are in pretty good shape considering their age,
    possibly because they've been stored in the dark so dye fade and
    color shift is minimal. But, they're covered with dust. Groan!
    I've tried scanning some with a mediocre scanner with mediocre
    results. Obviously, I would never attempt to scan nearly the
    total. I estimate that the "keepers" are in the range of 700-800,
    still a big job to do myself if I ever decide to buy a dedicated
    slide/neg scanner and a piece of change for a service bureau to
    do.

    I'd never given any thought to the simple expedient of showing
    them on a white wall and at least trying my Rebel XT on a tripod
    with proper adjustment for WB, brightness/contrast, etc.

    But, the real reason I am chiming in a 2nd time in this short
    thread is to fully support your notion to test drive any way you
    or me or the OP decide to attack the problem. In my other reply,
    I said to ALWAYS send irreplaceable slides in small batches and
    try to keep the batches relatively similar in exposure et al so
    that the scanning service can take direction from me.

    If I ultimately decide to use a service bureau, I will pay the
    price for one that is more "professional", meaning that I can
    give direction to for color balance and brightness/contrast, and
    one that can try to use Digital Ice on the dust, although I
    believe that at least some versions of Kodachrome won't work with
    DI.

    Again, no matter what method(s) are chosen, test, test, and test
    again is the watch word.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry
     
    HEMI-Powered, Jun 1, 2007
    #8
  9. LeighWillaston

    HEMI-Powered Guest

    MarkW offered these thoughts for the group's consideration of
    the matter at hand:

    > I've done that with 8mm movies as well, and have also scanned
    > old family photo albums with a digital camera (I've also
    > scanned many years worth of 35mm negatives using a film
    > scanner -- with a good negative, the results are very good,
    > but it's quite time-consuming). I think the slide projector
    > method is an excellent idea in that once you get things set
    > up, it should be many, many times faster than using a flatbed
    > or dedicated film scanner. Use your lowest ISO setting (and
    > a tripod if necessary). Obviously make sure both the camera
    > and projector focus are spot on (preferably put the camera in
    > manual focus mode, so you don't have the possibility of random
    > focus misses as you go). And experiment with the white
    > balance (or shoot raw and post- process). And if you see
    > particular images that are especially worthy of more careful
    > treatment, make a note of those as you go and then use a film
    > scanner or scanning service on only those.
    >

    Mark, I see no way around the time consuming part. If the number
    to be scanned/photographed on a wall is at all large, at the very
    least, one would have to go through them one by one and cull out
    the keepers and leave the less memorable in the tray. That itself
    takes time, especially since I would try to mark them so I could
    figure out which position in the tray they came from. I have
    toyed with the idea of buying a Nikon Coolscan dedicated scanner,
    maybe a 5000 or a newer model if there is one. I'm told these
    scan 4 at a time. So, scan time is going to be both tedious and a
    PITA, as it tweaking all those old slides that are less than
    perfect and giving them a reasonable name.

    Your advice is excellent and in keeping with what I'd learned the
    last time I investigated both scanners and service bureaus more
    than a year ago. I suppose the quantity I have to do and the time
    and expense involved are causing me to drag my feet. Maybe I'll
    give the projector method a whirl and see if that is good enough
    ....

    --
    HP, aka Jerry
     
    HEMI-Powered, Jun 1, 2007
    #9
  10. LeighWillaston

    dennis@home Guest

    "LeighWillaston" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I want to
    > transfer to digital images.
    >
    > On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very time
    > consuming.


    I converted about 2000 negatives using a HP SJ4890.
    It takes its time but I did 5 strips of 4 negs at a time (it's a flatbed
    with built in A4 transparency adapter).
    It was a case of put 5 strips in start it off and go and do something else
    (like sleep).
    It came with holders for 5 strips of 35mm negatives, 16 mounted slides, and
    a cut film one.

    Don't do 4800dpi as the files are far too large.
    Use a lens brush to remove the dust.
     
    dennis@home, Jun 1, 2007
    #10
  11. LeighWillaston

    King Sardon Guest

    On Fri, 1 Jun 2007 09:11:49 +0100, LeighWillaston
    <> wrote:

    >
    >I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I want to
    >transfer to digital images.
    >
    >On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very time
    >consuming.
    >
    >I have a 35 mm carousel projector, and wonder whether I can photograph
    >each image as I project it onto a white surface.
    >
    >Has anyone else done this, and are there some factors I need to take
    >into consideration, such as size of projected image, setting of digital
    >camera, etc.?


    Interesting idea, should give reasonable results.

    But I don't think it is ideal. Slide projector lenses are pretty cheap
    and usually work wide open (they are designed to be as bright as
    possible), meaning sharpness won't be that great. The projector heats
    the slide and the center of the slide will usually move a bit and then
    pop. That affects focus. You may get it sharp or not. Some projector
    lenses have a curved field that is supposed to match the curvature of
    the popped slide, but that does not work that real well... and works
    poorly with glass-mounted slides which are flat.

    There were plenty of problems back in the old days getting slides to
    project well, and you will have them all back if you use this method
    to capture them digitally.

    It might be better to use a slide duplicating rig. You can buy these
    or rig one up by pointing the digital camera at a light box or
    flash-illuminated paper or whatever. Then you can use a high quality
    macro lens for imaging onto the digital sensor, and stop it down to
    get better focus. The light intensity will be much less and the slide
    should not pop. You can also control the light source to get daylight
    quality... might be easier to deal with for the sensor.

    Either way, slides are a high contrast source, so I would get into the
    menu of the digital camera and tone down the contrast if your camera
    allows that.

    Good luck and let us know how it turned out.

    KS
     
    King Sardon, Jun 1, 2007
    #11
  12. LeighWillaston

    MarkW Guest

    On Jun 1, 2:35 pm, "HEMI-Powered" <> wrote:
    > MarkW offered these thoughts for the group's consideration of
    > the matter at hand:
    >
    > Mark, I see no way around the time consuming part. If the number
    > to be scanned/photographed on a wall is at all large, at the very
    > least, one would have to go through them one by one and cull out
    > the keepers and leave the less memorable in the tray.


    Well, I would think that you could probably 'scan' slides using a
    projector with a carousel at a rate of several per minute. That is
    just WAY faster than using a negative scanner. And I wasn't thinking
    of pulling all the keepers for film scanning. I would expect that if
    you get things set up right, the quality will be quite good, so I was
    thinking of using the film scanner only on a relatively small number
    of 'classics'.

    > That itself
    > takes time, especially since I would try to mark them so I could
    > figure out which position in the tray they came from. I have
    > toyed with the idea of buying a Nikon Coolscan dedicated scanner,
    > maybe a 5000 or a newer model if there is one. I'm told these
    > scan 4 at a time. So, scan time is going to be both tedious and a
    > PITA, as it tweaking all those old slides that are less than
    > perfect and giving them a reasonable name.
    >


    I would say, don't let the best be the enemy of the good, which is to
    say that you may get some very, very good results with a projector and
    camera. Here, for example, is a shot of my little brother. It's from
    a small, partly-faded, 40 year old color print that was in a photo
    album at my grandfather's house. Who knows where the negative is if
    it even still exists. I 'scanned' it by lighting it with a couple of
    $8 halogen work lights and then shot it hand-held with a Powershot
    Pro1:

    http://www.fototime.com/8E956F042A81CD3/orig.jpg

    No, it's not a 4000dpi film scan from a pristine negative, but I just
    can't complain about the result.

    > Your advice is excellent and in keeping with what I'd learned the
    > last time I investigated both scanners and service bureaus more
    > than a year ago. I suppose the quantity I have to do and the time
    > and expense involved are causing me to drag my feet. Maybe I'll
    > give the projector method a whirl and see if that is good enough
    > ...


    Yep, that's what I'd do.
     
    MarkW, Jun 1, 2007
    #12
  13. LeighWillaston

    Jim Guest

    "LeighWillaston" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I want to
    > transfer to digital images.
    >
    > On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very time
    > consuming.
    >
    > I have a 35 mm carousel projector, and wonder whether I can photograph
    > each image as I project it onto a white surface.
    >
    > Has anyone else done this, and are there some factors I need to take
    > into consideration, such as size of projected image, setting of digital
    > camera, etc.?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > LeighWillaston

    Years ago, I shot verious types of slide film. These were Ancocolor,
    Kodachrome, Kodachrome II, Ektachrome E2, Ektachrome E4, and Anscochrome.
    Your technique has a chance of working with all of these kinds of film
    except E2 and E4. To get a good image (one worth printing at all) from E2
    and E4 is best
    done with a slide scanner that includes Digital Restoration of Color, such
    as my Coolscan LS40. The Kodachromes are OK; the Ansco films have lost
    a little contrast. The Ektachromes are red. Some of them may be resorable
    with curves and levels, but just using ROC is both quicker and better.

    I have about 1000 total of the slides that I took in the 1950s. I did take
    quite a few others, but I discarded the really bad ones.

    Jim
     
    Jim, Jun 1, 2007
    #13
  14. LeighWillaston

    Allen Guest

    King Sardon wrote:
    <snip>
    >
    > It might be better to use a slide duplicating rig. You can buy these
    > or rig one up by pointing the digital camera at a light box or
    > flash-illuminated paper or whatever. Then you can use a high quality
    > macro lens for imaging onto the digital sensor, and stop it down to
    > get better focus. The light intensity will be much less and the slide
    > should not pop. You can also control the light source to get daylight
    > quality... might be easier to deal with for the sensor.
    >

    <snip>

    I used this method in 1995 to copy 360 slides to print film. (I remember
    the exact number because I had planned to do 100.) All the color
    pictures of my children when they were still children were color slides
    or B/W. I rigged a duplicator by using extension tubes and a slide
    holder; using this rig in bright sunlight, I copied them to color film.
    I made albums and gave them to them as Christmas gifts, and they were
    ecstatic. However, last year I got a Canon flat-bed scanner and recopied
    most of those same slides to digital files (along with a few thousand
    other slides). The quality of the scanned images was much better than
    the rephotographed ones. I will have to say that the scanning process
    was slow, but I'm retired and my time is cheap. Also, I will add that
    those scanned images cost me considerably less.
    Allen
     
    Allen, Jun 2, 2007
    #14
  15. LeighWillaston

    Allen Guest

    Jim wrote:
    > "LeighWillaston" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I want to
    >> transfer to digital images.
    >>
    >> On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very time
    >> consuming.
    >>
    >> I have a 35 mm carousel projector, and wonder whether I can photograph
    >> each image as I project it onto a white surface.
    >>
    >> Has anyone else done this, and are there some factors I need to take
    >> into consideration, such as size of projected image, setting of digital
    >> camera, etc.?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> LeighWillaston

    > Years ago, I shot verious types of slide film. These were Ancocolor,
    > Kodachrome, Kodachrome II, Ektachrome E2, Ektachrome E4, and Anscochrome.
    > Your technique has a chance of working with all of these kinds of film
    > except E2 and E4. To get a good image (one worth printing at all) from E2
    > and E4 is best
    > done with a slide scanner that includes Digital Restoration of Color, such
    > as my Coolscan LS40. The Kodachromes are OK; the Ansco films have lost
    > a little contrast. The Ektachromes are red. Some of them may be resorable
    > with curves and levels, but just using ROC is both quicker and better.
    >
    > I have about 1000 total of the slides that I took in the 1950s. I did take
    > quite a few others, but I discarded the really bad ones.
    >
    > Jim
    >
    >

    My slides were mostly on Kodachrome, Ektachrome and Fujichrome, with a
    few on Agfa. The Kodachromes from the mid-1940s and the 1950s all still
    had good color; later ones showed considerable variation (all except one
    roll were processed by Kodak--that one exception was so bad that I
    converte the images to B/W). The Ektachromes (some home-processed, some
    commercial) were all over the place; some were nearly unusable. On the
    other hand, the Fujichromes, all home-processed, were without exception
    quite good color-wise. The last of the slides were from around 1982, so
    they plenty of opportunity to fade and/or color shift.

    Allen
     
    Allen, Jun 2, 2007
    #15
  16. LeighWillaston

    Bob Williams Guest

    LeighWillaston wrote:
    > I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I want to
    > transfer to digital images.
    >
    > On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very time
    > consuming.
    >
    > I have a 35 mm carousel projector, and wonder whether I can photograph
    > each image as I project it onto a white surface.
    >
    > Has anyone else done this, and are there some factors I need to take
    > into consideration, such as size of projected image, setting of digital
    > camera, etc.?


    You can do it that way but the results are not so hot.
    A slide projector's lens is actually pretty poor.
    A much better way to do it is to photograph it with a camera that has a
    decent macro lens that will allow you to make 1:1 copies. Many
    inexpensive digicams have this capability (focus to 3" or less).
    Put the slide in a template taped onto on a 5500K light box. Then put
    your camera on a tripod at the correct distance from the slide. You can
    copy the slides as fast as you can position a new one.

    Another option is to have it done by an online processor. They do good
    work for VERY reasonable prices.
    See: > http://www.myspecialphotos.com/pdfs/ScanningOrderForm.pdf
    Bob Williams
     
    Bob Williams, Jun 2, 2007
    #16
  17. On Jun 1, 3:11 am, LeighWillaston
    <> wrote:
    > I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I want to
    > transfer to digital images.
    >
    > On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very time
    > consuming.
    >
    > I have a 35 mm carousel projector, and wonder whether I can photograph
    > each image as I project it onto a white surface.
    >
    > Has anyone else done this, and are there some factors I need to take
    > into consideration, such as size of projected image, setting of digital
    > camera, etc.?
    >
    > --
    > LeighWillaston


    While I have rephotographed projected images, there is another idea
    you might look into.

    Some print scanners with transparency adapters allow you to load
    multiple slides. You do have to scan each seperately, but I found
    using that scanner (in a museum I was volunteering at) much quicker
    than with my own scanner that required loading each slide
    individually. Seems to me the one that loaded multiples had spaces
    for either fifteen or twenty at a load.

    Those transparency adapters on flatbed scanners are fine if you are
    just archiving them for ordinary purposes and do not need super high
    resolution or quality.
     
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota, Jun 2, 2007
    #17
  18. Don Stauffer in Minnesota <> wrote:

    > <> wrote:
    > > I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I want to
    > > transfer to digital images.
    > > On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very time
    > > consuming.

    >
    > While I have rephotographed projected images, there is another idea
    > you might look into.
    >
    > Some print scanners with transparency adapters allow you to load
    > multiple slides. You do have to scan each seperately, but I found
    > using that scanner (in a museum I was volunteering at) much quicker
    > than with my own scanner that required loading each slide
    > individually. Seems to me the one that loaded multiples had spaces
    > for either fifteen or twenty at a load.
    >
    > Those transparency adapters on flatbed scanners are fine if you are
    > just archiving them for ordinary purposes and do not need super high
    > resolution or quality.


    I would buy a used slide scanner, use it, and then sell it. That way you
    will get a real good job and it will cost you almost nothing.

    --
    Pardon my spam deterrent; send email to
    Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA
    http://rhodyman.net
     
    Stephen Henning, Jun 3, 2007
    #18
  19. LeighWillaston

    Roger (K8RI) Guest

    On Fri, 1 Jun 2007 09:11:49 +0100, LeighWillaston
    <> wrote:

    >
    >I have hundreds of 35 mm slides of family and travel which I want to
    >transfer to digital images.
    >

    So far...Scanning the old family slides and negatives I passed 35,000
    some time ago. http://www.rogerhalstead.com/scanning.htm
    All scanning was done at 4000 dpi. Some of those slides are well over
    50 years old. The quality varies the range from like new to having
    been in a projector too long in a dusty environment I haven't even
    started on the really old prints and "petrified cardboard" prints.

    >On the rare occasions when I can access a scanner, it is very time
    >consuming.


    and scanning is only a portion of the work.
    A lot of that time depends on what you are using for equipment and
    what you consider satisfactory quality for the end result. If you
    will be satisfied with a quality that will display on computer screen
    well you have a much easier job than trying to maintain the original
    slide's quality.

    >
    >I have a 35 mm carousel projector, and wonder whether I can photograph
    >each image as I project it onto a white surface.


    If you will be satisfied with just displaying the results on a
    computer screen, it should be possible. In going this route, I'd use a
    flat white surface, make sure the projector is level and perpendicular
    to the white surface. I'd mount the camera slightly in front of the
    projector and just above or below the projector's lens. Actually if
    you mount the projector a couple of degrees off center and the camera
    off center the other direction the result should be a true replica of
    the original image. That flat white surface must be smooth and clean.
    The results should be more than adequate for even displaying on one of
    the new 22 or 24" wide screen monitors.

    >
    >Has anyone else done this, and are there some factors I need to take
    >into consideration, such as size of projected image, setting of digital
    >camera, etc.?


    Size and settings probably won't be critical or at least relatively
    so. The camera's auto exposure will probably be adequate, but you
    should take a few trial shots. Use a tripod and if you need to use
    slower shutter speeds use a cable release. The larger the projected
    image the more exposure the camera will need and you may need to
    manually set the color temperature to get rid of a red or yellow cast.
    One other thing, the farther the camera and projector are from the
    projected image the less of a problem the slight angle differences
    between the camera and projector. (considering the image gets larger
    with distance and the projector does not use a zoom lens. If it does
    use a zoom use one of the longer settings and back the projector away.

    Good Luck.
     
    Roger (K8RI), Jun 3, 2007
    #19
  20. David J Taylor, Jun 4, 2007
    #20
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