Consortium seeks ultimate DVD: hundreds of movies per disc.

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Allan, Feb 14, 2005.

  1. Allan

    Allan Guest

    Sunday, February 13, 2005

    Consortium seeks ultimate DVD: hundreds of movies per disc
    A consortium of technology firms are developing holographic versatile
    disc (HVD) technology, a new disc format that could allow up to a
    terabyte of data to be stored on a single disc - about as much as 200
    standard DVDs. HVD is based on a holographic technology developed by
    Optware, a Japanese firm that is one of the members of the consortium.

    Overview:

    * A few hundred movies on an optical disc?
    * That's the goal of the Holographic Versatile Disc (HVD)
    Alliance.
    * Six companies, including Fuji Photo and CMC Magnentics, have
    formed a consortium to promote HVD technology, which will let
    consumers conceivably put a terabyte (1TB) of data onto a single
    optical disc.
    * A TB-size disc would certainly compress movie collections.
    * The consortium said an HVD disc could hold as much data as 200
    standard DVDs and transfer data at over 1 gigabit per second, or 40
    times faster than a DVD.
    * HVD is a possible successor to technologies such as Blu-ray and
    HD DVD.
    * Single layer Blu-ray discs hold about 25GB of data while
    dual-layer discs hold 50GB.
    * Ordinary DVD discs, meanwhile, hold about 4.7GB.
    * HVD technology will be pitched at corporations and the
    entertainment market, the HVD Alliance said.
    * The technology behind HVD is based on holography technology from
    Japan's Optware, one of the six founders of the consortium.
    * Sony unveiled a home server with 1TB of storage for the Japanese
    market last year.
    * Half of the capacity would be enough to record six channels of
    TV for five and a half days non-stop, Sony said.
    * The organization, however, is looking at first developing discs
    with lower capacities.
    * The first assignments of the technical committee involve coming
    up with standards for a 200GB recordable disc and a 100GB read-only
    disc.
    * If history is an indication, consumers will fill the disc up.
    * High-definition broadcasting and gaming are also expected to add
    a heavy burden to existing home storage systems because of the size of
    the files.
    * Two hours of HD programming takes up about 15GB to 25GB.

    Source:
    http://news.com.com/Group aims to drastically up disc storage/2100-1041_3-5562599.html






    "Arguing with anonymous strangers on the Internet is a sucker's game
    because they almost always turn out to be -- or to be indistinguishable from
    -- self-righteous sixteen-year-olds possessing infinite amounts of free time."
    - Neil Stephenson, _Cryptonomicon_
     
    Allan, Feb 14, 2005
    #1
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  2. Allan

    Dragon Guest

    Ok real good idea but can you imagine the size of the box to put all titles
    on it, it would be bigger than a dvd player alone especially if you had
    pictures too and in the box one single dvd disc LOL


    "Allan" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Sunday, February 13, 2005
    >
    > Consortium seeks ultimate DVD: hundreds of movies per disc
    > A consortium of technology firms are developing holographic versatile
    > disc (HVD) technology, a new disc format that could allow up to a
    > terabyte of data to be stored on a single disc - about as much as 200
    > standard DVDs. HVD is based on a holographic technology developed by
    > Optware, a Japanese firm that is one of the members of the consortium.
    >
    > Overview:
    >
    > * A few hundred movies on an optical disc?
    > * That's the goal of the Holographic Versatile Disc (HVD)
    > Alliance.
    > * Six companies, including Fuji Photo and CMC Magnentics, have
    > formed a consortium to promote HVD technology, which will let
    > consumers conceivably put a terabyte (1TB) of data onto a single
    > optical disc.
    > * A TB-size disc would certainly compress movie collections.
    > * The consortium said an HVD disc could hold as much data as 200
    > standard DVDs and transfer data at over 1 gigabit per second, or 40
    > times faster than a DVD.
    > * HVD is a possible successor to technologies such as Blu-ray and
    > HD DVD.
    > * Single layer Blu-ray discs hold about 25GB of data while
    > dual-layer discs hold 50GB.
    > * Ordinary DVD discs, meanwhile, hold about 4.7GB.
    > * HVD technology will be pitched at corporations and the
    > entertainment market, the HVD Alliance said.
    > * The technology behind HVD is based on holography technology from
    > Japan's Optware, one of the six founders of the consortium.
    > * Sony unveiled a home server with 1TB of storage for the Japanese
    > market last year.
    > * Half of the capacity would be enough to record six channels of
    > TV for five and a half days non-stop, Sony said.
    > * The organization, however, is looking at first developing discs
    > with lower capacities.
    > * The first assignments of the technical committee involve coming
    > up with standards for a 200GB recordable disc and a 100GB read-only
    > disc.
    > * If history is an indication, consumers will fill the disc up.
    > * High-definition broadcasting and gaming are also expected to add
    > a heavy burden to existing home storage systems because of the size of
    > the files.
    > * Two hours of HD programming takes up about 15GB to 25GB.
    >
    > Source:
    > http://news.com.com/Group aims to drastically up disc storage/2100-1041_3-5562599.html
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Arguing with anonymous strangers on the Internet is a sucker's game
    > because they almost always turn out to be -- or to be indistinguishable
    > from
    > -- self-righteous sixteen-year-olds possessing infinite amounts of free
    > time."
    > - Neil Stephenson, _Cryptonomicon_
     
    Dragon, Feb 14, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Allan

    RichA Guest

    On Mon, 14 Feb 2005 07:38:47 -0500, Allan
    <> wrote:

    >Sunday, February 13, 2005
    >
    >Consortium seeks ultimate DVD: hundreds of movies per disc
    >A consortium of technology firms are developing holographic versatile
    >disc (HVD) technology, a new disc format that could allow up to a
    >terabyte of data to be stored on a single disc - about as much as 200
    >standard DVDs. HVD is based on a holographic technology developed by
    >Optware, a Japanese firm that is one of the members of the consortium.
    >
    >Overview:
    >
    > * A few hundred movies on an optical disc?


    Sure. People will walk into video store and say, "I'll take disk 3."
    I don't like half the movies on it, but it's only $2500.
     
    RichA, Feb 14, 2005
    #3
  4. Allan

    Nick Guest

    Right that's it I'm not buying any more DVD's. ;-)


    "Allan" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Sunday, February 13, 2005
    >
    > Consortium seeks ultimate DVD: hundreds of movies per disc
    > A consortium of technology firms are developing holographic versatile
    > disc (HVD) technology, a new disc format that could allow up to a
    > terabyte of data to be stored on a single disc - about as much as 200
    > standard DVDs. HVD is based on a holographic technology developed by
    > Optware, a Japanese firm that is one of the members of the consortium.
    >
    > Overview:
    >
    > * A few hundred movies on an optical disc?
    > * That's the goal of the Holographic Versatile Disc (HVD)
    > Alliance.
    > * Six companies, including Fuji Photo and CMC Magnentics, have
    > formed a consortium to promote HVD technology, which will let
    > consumers conceivably put a terabyte (1TB) of data onto a single
    > optical disc.
    > * A TB-size disc would certainly compress movie collections.
    > * The consortium said an HVD disc could hold as much data as 200
    > standard DVDs and transfer data at over 1 gigabit per second, or 40
    > times faster than a DVD.
    > * HVD is a possible successor to technologies such as Blu-ray and
    > HD DVD.
    > * Single layer Blu-ray discs hold about 25GB of data while
    > dual-layer discs hold 50GB.
    > * Ordinary DVD discs, meanwhile, hold about 4.7GB.
    > * HVD technology will be pitched at corporations and the
    > entertainment market, the HVD Alliance said.
    > * The technology behind HVD is based on holography technology from
    > Japan's Optware, one of the six founders of the consortium.
    > * Sony unveiled a home server with 1TB of storage for the Japanese
    > market last year.
    > * Half of the capacity would be enough to record six channels of
    > TV for five and a half days non-stop, Sony said.
    > * The organization, however, is looking at first developing discs
    > with lower capacities.
    > * The first assignments of the technical committee involve coming
    > up with standards for a 200GB recordable disc and a 100GB read-only
    > disc.
    > * If history is an indication, consumers will fill the disc up.
    > * High-definition broadcasting and gaming are also expected to add
    > a heavy burden to existing home storage systems because of the size of
    > the files.
    > * Two hours of HD programming takes up about 15GB to 25GB.
    >
    > Source:
    > http://news.com.com/Group aims to drastically up disc storage/2100-1041_3-5562599.html
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Arguing with anonymous strangers on the Internet is a sucker's game
    > because they almost always turn out to be -- or to be indistinguishable
    > from
    > -- self-righteous sixteen-year-olds possessing infinite amounts of free
    > time."
    > - Neil Stephenson, _Cryptonomicon_
     
    Nick, Feb 14, 2005
    #4
  5. "Allan" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Sunday, February 13, 2005
    >
    > Consortium seeks ultimate DVD: hundreds of movies per disc
    >


    I don't know if that'd be such a great idea. If *one* disc gets lost or
    damaged, you'd lose your entire collection. Of course, by the time this
    format becomes mainstream, they'll probably have 60TB hard drives and HVD-R
    for easy backup.

    Then again, it'd be cool to have an entire TV series on *one* disc.
     
    Patrick Michael, Feb 15, 2005
    #5
  6. Allan

    Guest

    I don't know about hundreds of movies on one disc, but I have already
    seen a regular dvd which claims that there's (I think 22 full uncut
    movies) all on one disc.

    yes, that's twenty-two, not a misprint of two.
     
    , Feb 15, 2005
    #6
  7. Allan

    Jay G. Guest

    On Tue, 15 Feb 2005 13:46:33 -0500, wrote:

    > I don't know about hundreds of movies on one disc, but I have already
    > seen a regular dvd which claims that there's (I think 22 full uncut
    > movies) all on one disc.
    >
    > yes, that's twenty-two, not a misprint of two.


    Can you provide any other information, like a link or a name or a list of
    titles, or is this one of your delusions again?

    -Jay (like I have to ask.)
     
    Jay G., Feb 15, 2005
    #7
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