Connecting to the internet

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Jack Bean, Jul 9, 2009.

  1. Jack Bean

    Jack Bean Guest

    Does anyone have a website that shows the process of connecting to the internet
    with some fairly good details? I know the basics, but what exactly causes your
    signal, dialup, cable, wifi, whatever, to access servers?
    Jack Bean, Jul 9, 2009
    #1
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  2. Jack Bean

    Dan C Guest

    On Wed, 08 Jul 2009 20:51:56 -0700, Jack Bean wrote:

    > Does anyone have a website that shows the process of connecting to the
    > internet with some fairly good details? I know the basics, but what
    > exactly causes your signal, dialup, cable, wifi, whatever, to access
    > servers?


    http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/cluepon.jpg


    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    Ahhhhhhhh!: http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/relieve.jpg
    Dan C, Jul 9, 2009
    #2
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  3. Jack Bean

    Jack Bean Guest

    In article <000383d4$0$7728$>, Dan C says...
    >
    >On Wed, 08 Jul 2009 20:51:56 -0700, Jack Bean wrote:
    >
    >> Does anyone have a website that shows the process of connecting to the
    >> internet with some fairly good details? I know the basics, but what
    >> exactly causes your signal, dialup, cable, wifi, whatever, to access
    >> servers?

    >
    >http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/cluepon.jpg
    >
    >



    Quit your day job and become a stand up comic in a bordello.
    Jack Bean, Jul 9, 2009
    #3
  4. Jack Bean

    jack bean Guest

    In article <>,
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?= says...
    >
    >Jack Bean wrote:
    >>Does anyone have a website that shows the process of connecting to the internet
    >>with some fairly good details? I know the basics, but what exactly causes your
    >> signal, dialup, cable, wifi, whatever, to access servers?

    >
    >That is an incredibly broad question. You may want to investigate IP
    >(internet protocol) communications. As a starting point:
    >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Protocol_Suite



    Yep. That would be the bare basics. Perhaps I should ask what commands are
    needed to make the connection with? Say if I wanted to write a web browser, or
    some application that would require a connection, where could I learn to do
    this?
    jack bean, Jul 9, 2009
    #4
  5. Jack Bean

    VanguardLH Guest

    Jack Bean wrote:

    > Does anyone have a website that shows the process of connecting to the internet
    > with some fairly good details? I know the basics, but what exactly causes your
    > signal, dialup, cable, wifi, whatever, to access servers?


    Visit your local library.
    VanguardLH, Jul 9, 2009
    #5
  6. Jack Bean

    PeeCee Guest

    "Jack Bean" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Does anyone have a website that shows the process of connecting to the
    > internet
    > with some fairly good details? I know the basics, but what exactly causes
    > your
    > signal, dialup, cable, wifi, whatever, to access servers?
    >




    Jack

    As Roger implies you ask a rather ill defined question, but he is right to
    point you to TCP/IP information.

    Connecting to the Internet is rather simple in conceptual terms.
    Your application makes a call to the Operating System to send or receive
    data using the OS's networking services.
    If your OS can not find the requested data locally then your OS usually asks
    the 'Gateway' address if it can find the data.
    This Gateway address is usually your "Internet Connection" be it Dialup,
    ADSL, Wireless or Cable.
    This Gateway then enquires 'up' the chain to your ISP and other Internet
    services seeking/getting the data your application want's.

    I guess the concept you have to get your head around is you don't issue
    'commands' to connect to the internet.
    Particularly with broadband you are already connected to the Internet.
    What your application does is ask the Operating System for data from it's
    networking services.
    If the OS then has to ask other network services either localy or on the
    "Internet" then those connections are made using the protocols the network
    runs on.
    So in the case of the Internet 'TCP/IP' is the protocol used to seek,
    transfer and receive information from other Internet networking services.
    So if you understand TCP/IP then you understand how the majority of modern
    'Internetworking' works.

    I rather like this statement from one of the sites listed below:
    "While the Internet Protocol has many functions and characteristics, it can
    be boiled down to one primary purpose: the delivery of datagrams across an
    internetwork of connected networks."

    The second your dialup connects to your ISP, or you plug the Ethernet cable
    from your ADSL/Wireless/Cable modem into your PC you are part of this
    'internetwork of connected networks' ie the "Internet".
    ie you are 'Connected'


    These links may help you understand what's involved:
    http://modemhelp.net/faqs/tcp.shtml
    http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/iaabu/centri4/user/scf4ap1.htm
    http://people.seas.harvard.edu/~jon...re12/local_copies/tcpip/how_does_it_work.html
    http://www.tcpipguide.com/free/t_IPOverviewandKeyOperationalCharacteristics.htm


    Best
    Paul.
    PeeCee, Jul 9, 2009
    #6
  7. Jack Bean

    PeeCee Guest

    "Rôgêr" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    > PeeCee wrote:
    >> "Jack Bean" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Does anyone have a website that shows the process of connecting to the
    >>> internet
    >>> with some fairly good details? I know the basics, but what exactly
    >>> causes your
    >>> signal, dialup, cable, wifi, whatever, to access servers?
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Jack
    >>
    >> As Roger implies you ask a rather ill defined question, but he is right
    >> to point you to TCP/IP information.
    >>
    >> Connecting to the Internet is rather simple in conceptual terms.
    >> Your application makes a call to the Operating System to send or receive
    >> data using the OS's networking services.
    >> If your OS can not find the requested data locally then your OS usually
    >> asks the 'Gateway' address if it can find the data.
    >> This Gateway address is usually your "Internet Connection" be it Dialup,
    >> ADSL, Wireless or Cable.
    >> This Gateway then enquires 'up' the chain to your ISP and other Internet
    >> services seeking/getting the data your application want's.
    >>
    >> I guess the concept you have to get your head around is you don't issue
    >> 'commands' to connect to the internet.
    >> Particularly with broadband you are already connected to the Internet.
    >> What your application does is ask the Operating System for data from it's
    >> networking services.
    >> If the OS then has to ask other network services either localy or on the
    >> "Internet" then those connections are made using the protocols the
    >> network runs on.
    >> So in the case of the Internet 'TCP/IP' is the protocol used to seek,
    >> transfer and receive information from other Internet networking services.
    >> So if you understand TCP/IP then you understand how the majority of
    >> modern 'Internetworking' works.
    >>
    >> I rather like this statement from one of the sites listed below:
    >> "While the Internet Protocol has many functions and characteristics, it
    >> can be boiled down to one primary purpose: the delivery of datagrams
    >> across an internetwork of connected networks."
    >>
    >> The second your dialup connects to your ISP, or you plug the Ethernet
    >> cable from your ADSL/Wireless/Cable modem into your PC you are part of
    >> this 'internetwork of connected networks' ie the "Internet".
    >> ie you are 'Connected'

    >
    > Thas xacactly what I wuz saying. Thank you. :)



    YW
    P.
    PeeCee, Jul 9, 2009
    #7
  8. Jack Bean

    why? Guest

    On 8 Jul 2009 20:51:56 -0700, Jack Bean wrote:

    >Does anyone have a website that shows the process of connecting to the internet
    >with some fairly good details? I know the basics, but what exactly causes your
    >signal, dialup, cable, wifi, whatever, to access servers?


    Wow what a big question.....

    http://www.warriorsofthe.net/movie.html
    Here you can find the movie Warriors of the net in several different
    languages. It is the prefect tool for introducing Internet to novice
    users. It helps the newcommers visualise how the Net works. The movie is
    12 minutes long. It is about an IP packets journey through net past
    routers, firewalls and transatlantic cables.


    You know the basics such as what?

    Ethernet
    http://www.ethermanage.com/ethernet/ethernet.html
    how it came to be.

    Dialup
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modem
    Modem (from modulator-demodulator)

    Cable/Wifi are variations on a theme, different physical connections ,
    transmission schemes and so on.

    Cable modem signaling
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DOCSIS
    the ISP end of a cable modem on the HFC network
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_fibre-coaxial
    is a
    uBR/CMTS
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cmts

    Then there is the whole routing issue
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_routing

    ISPs tend to do peering
    http://searchtelecom.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid103_gci212768,00.html
    across thier AS to actually get to the internet backbone.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autonomous_system_(Internet)
    odd that pasted badly due to the (



    There isn't really a start, unless you go back to
    Physical Layer - connectors/cable specs.
    Data Link - Transfer data between nodes.
    Up the OSI layers
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OSI_model
    TCP/IP layers don't quite match OSI
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TCP/IP_model
    (TCP/IP isn't the only protocol)

    Getting that out of the way you go high level to client/server services.
    http://www.tcpipguide.com/free/t_TCPIPServicesandClientServerOperation.htm

    You load a web browser (skip over all the software development /
    interfacing to fundamental processes) that's your client.

    [ You will be used to assuming that http runs on port 80, smtp mail is
    25, pop3 110, telnet 23 and so on there is a list of well known ports
    services are defined to run on the first 1024 in this list.

    www.iana.org/assignments/port-numbers
    Many of the other 60000+ are also defined, but generally you go out on
    port 80 http and a random port number back.

    If you have a Windows OS, the port / application list is
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/832017
    This is the sort of list you use writing firewall rules, it lists
    services with ports and protocols. ]

    You type in a web address that's a (server physical box) running a
    server service i.e. web server which listens for connections.

    So you start at OSI 7 (basically) your application (browser) down to OSI
    L1 across various layers 1-5 ish then back to L1 to 7 on ther server. Oh
    then all in reverse again :)

    See the stack connections diagram
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TCP/IP_model

    Then TCP/IP itself sends out a request, waits for an answer, establishes
    a connection, transfers data.

    TCP/IP and HTTP sequence diagrams,
    http://www.eventhelix.com/RealtimeMantra/Networking/
    the *classic Stevens* diagram from the book.
    http://www.cse.iitb.ac.in/perfnet/cs456/tcp-state-diag.pdf
    His text books, this is the really low leval guts of TCP,IP,HTTP,Telnet
    and so on. The 3 - TCP/IP Illustrated volumes.
    http://www.kohala.com/start/
    You will notice the other titles, tey cover just about everything else
    that's now relied on mail,dns, ipc, ftp, sockets, signals.

    The essentials, RFC
    http://www.ietf.org/rfc.html
    and it's index
    http://www.ietf.org/iesg/1rfc_index.txt

    What is a RFC
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Request_for_Comments
    pop3 email RFC
    This is the basics of how pop3 works
    http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1939.txt
    the commands to delete mail, list mail , command status.

    HTTP
    http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616.html
    this is where you get the 404 Page not found from (and status OK code
    200 you don't see but you get the page loading). It's 1 of the various
    messages about the HTTP conversation.

    Domain Names / IPs
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Assigned_Numbers_Authority


    Other sites,
    http://www.webopedia.com/
    http://computer.howstuffworks.com/
    http://www.tcpipguide.com/

    Then of course not forgetting several 100 other things .... including,
    switches
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_switch
    proxies
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proxy_server


    Me
    why?, Jul 9, 2009
    #8
  9. Jack Bean

    why? Guest

    On 8 Jul 2009 21:41:51 -0700, jack bean wrote:

    >In article <>,
    >=?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?= says...
    >>
    >>Jack Bean wrote:
    >>>Does anyone have a website that shows the process of connecting to the internet
    >>>with some fairly good details? I know the basics, but what exactly causes your
    >>> signal, dialup, cable, wifi, whatever, to access servers?

    >>
    >>That is an incredibly broad question. You may want to investigate IP
    >>(internet protocol) communications. As a starting point:
    >>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Protocol_Suite

    >
    >
    >Yep. That would be the bare basics. Perhaps I should ask what commands are
    >needed to make the connection with? Say if I wanted to write a web browser, or
    >some application that would require a connection, where could I learn to do
    >this?


    Pick a developemt tool, collect the appropriate libraries,
    http://www.innovation.ch/java/HTTPClient/
    write the application.

    http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/networking/sockets/index.html

    http://www.eggheadcafe.com/articles/20020323.asp

    http://devmentor.org/articles/network/Socket Programming.pdf
    Client / Server Programming with TCP/IP Sockets
    That's a good article, pictures :)

    It's the Stevens books mentioned earlier.

    Here is a class project to write a client/server
    http://www.cs.iastate.edu/~cs586/f02/project1/project1.htm

    http://gsk.sourceforge.net/gsk-reference/tutorial-httpclient.html
    Tutorial: Writing a HTTP client — How to write a web client

    Oh and finally www.google.com :)

    Results 11 - 20 of about 11,200,000 for write http client server. (0.11
    seconds)

    Me
    why?, Jul 9, 2009
    #9
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