Connected ... but am I secure?

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by tempgal, Jul 19, 2007.

  1. tempgal

    tempgal Guest

    Hi --

    Please still be gentle. I'm making progress but am not a real techie yet.

    My Internet connection is via wired router. As of today, I also have
    connected a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router with DD-WRT which is configured as an
    access point so that I can use my notebook computer downstairs and outside
    on the deck. The Buffalo has an original name and a new user name and
    password. I understand that it is best to not broadcast the name but I did
    leave it visible for the time being. I chose WEP security but can upgrade
    to a stronger security option.

    What concerns me is that when my router name appeared in the list of
    available wireless networks around my home, it was described as UNSECURED
    and the usual window appeared asking me if I wanted to connect to an
    unsecured network. Why would it be seen as unsecured? Shouldn't I have
    been required to login with a user name and password to connect? Would the
    fact that my wired router was already connected to the desktop computer
    where I had already logged in have any bearing? Is there a way to make
    logging in to the wireless network a requirement?

    Any suggestions/further coaching would be very much appreciated.

    Thanks.
    tempgal, Jul 19, 2007
    #1
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  2. tempgal

    Lem Guest

    tempgal wrote:
    > Hi --
    >
    > Please still be gentle. I'm making progress but am not a real techie yet.
    >
    > My Internet connection is via wired router. As of today, I also have
    > connected a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router with DD-WRT which is configured as an
    > access point so that I can use my notebook computer downstairs and outside
    > on the deck. The Buffalo has an original name and a new user name and
    > password. I understand that it is best to not broadcast the name but I did
    > leave it visible for the time being. I chose WEP security but can upgrade
    > to a stronger security option.
    >
    > What concerns me is that when my router name appeared in the list of
    > available wireless networks around my home, it was described as UNSECURED
    > and the usual window appeared asking me if I wanted to connect to an
    > unsecured network. Why would it be seen as unsecured? Shouldn't I have
    > been required to login with a user name and password to connect? Would the
    > fact that my wired router was already connected to the desktop computer
    > where I had already logged in have any bearing? Is there a way to make
    > logging in to the wireless network a requirement?
    >
    > Any suggestions/further coaching would be very much appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    >
    >
    >

    By all means upgrade your encryption to WPA or WPA2, bearing in mind
    that all wireless devices must support the same level of encryption.
    WEP encryption is rather easily pierced these days.

    Leave the SSID broadcast enabled (I think that's what you mean by "an
    original name"). Despite recurrent advice to disable SSID broadcast,
    this provides very little in the way of security and can lead to
    connectivity problems.

    Your instinct is correct: if you had enabled WEP security on the
    WHR-HP-G54 router, it should have appeared as a "secured" wireless
    network. What version of Windows are you using? If XP, have you
    installed service pack 2?

    What are you using on your notebook to wirelessly connect to your new
    wireless access point? Are you using the native Windows wireless
    connection management (if you're using XP, does the screen look like
    this:
    http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/sc...Connection/View_Wireless_Networks/Index.shtml)
    or are you using a utility provided by the notebook manufacturer or the
    manufacturer of your wireless adapter?

    Double check the settings on the WHR-HP-G54 router. Access its web
    configuration utility, click on the "Status" tab and then on the
    "Wireless" tab. What does "encryption" show?

    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    Lem, Jul 19, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. You need a Wireless Access Point as the second device,...not a wireless
    "router". I am skeptical when you say it is configured as an Access Point.
    I don't really trust that situation.

    As far as the Name (SSID), give it a new name to start with so you will know
    you are looking at the right one and not one of your neighbors who may just
    happen to have a device of the same brand with the same default SSID and
    running unsecured.

    If you are truely connecting to yours and it says it is unsecured, then you
    simply didn't get the WEP configured correctly or maybe left the
    configuration tool without saving the changes.

    --
    Phillip Windell
    www.wandtv.com

    The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
    or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    -----------------------------------------------------



    "tempgal" <> wrote in message
    news:ei%...
    > Hi --
    >
    > Please still be gentle. I'm making progress but am not a real techie yet.
    >
    > My Internet connection is via wired router. As of today, I also have
    > connected a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router with DD-WRT which is configured as
    > an access point so that I can use my notebook computer downstairs and
    > outside on the deck. The Buffalo has an original name and a new user name
    > and password. I understand that it is best to not broadcast the name but
    > I did leave it visible for the time being. I chose WEP security but can
    > upgrade to a stronger security option.
    >
    > What concerns me is that when my router name appeared in the list of
    > available wireless networks around my home, it was described as UNSECURED
    > and the usual window appeared asking me if I wanted to connect to an
    > unsecured network. Why would it be seen as unsecured? Shouldn't I have
    > been required to login with a user name and password to connect? Would
    > the fact that my wired router was already connected to the desktop
    > computer where I had already logged in have any bearing? Is there a way
    > to make logging in to the wireless network a requirement?
    >
    > Any suggestions/further coaching would be very much appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    Phillip Windell, Jul 19, 2007
    #3
  4. tempgal

    Lem Guest

    Phillip Windell wrote:
    > You need a Wireless Access Point as the second device,...not a wireless
    > "router". I am skeptical when you say it is configured as an Access Point.
    > I don't really trust that situation.
    >
    > As far as the Name (SSID), give it a new name to start with so you will know
    > you are looking at the right one and not one of your neighbors who may just
    > happen to have a device of the same brand with the same default SSID and
    > running unsecured.
    >
    > If you are truely connecting to yours and it says it is unsecured, then you
    > simply didn't get the WEP configured correctly or maybe left the
    > configuration tool without saving the changes.
    >


    Many SOHO wireless routers -- especially those in which DD-WRT firmware
    has been installed -- are easily configured as wireless access points.

    For advice on configuring stock wireless routers as access points, see
    http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html

    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    Lem, Jul 19, 2007
    #4
  5. "Lem" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Many SOHO wireless routers -- especially those in which DD-WRT firmware
    > has been installed -- are easily configured as wireless access points.
    >
    > For advice on configuring stock wireless routers as access points, see
    > http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html_Guidance_Computer


    Ok. I see.

    --
    Phillip Windell
    www.wandtv.com

    The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
    or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    -----------------------------------------------------
    Phillip Windell, Jul 19, 2007
    #5
  6. Hi
    1. Not many Routers can be flashed with 3rd party firmware (Some models of
    Linksys, few of Buffalo, one or two of Belikn, and few more. All together
    probably less than 20% of Router sold).
    2. While 3rd party firmware provide new functions to the Router that are Not
    available with the stock firmware, using the Router chained with another one
    still need a configuration as mentioned by Lem above.
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "Phillip Windell" <> wrote in message
    news:%23Ls%...
    > "Lem" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Many SOHO wireless routers -- especially those in which DD-WRT firmware
    >> has been installed -- are easily configured as wireless access points.
    >>
    >> For advice on configuring stock wireless routers as access points, see
    >> http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html_Guidance_Computer

    >
    > Ok. I see.
    >
    > --
    > Phillip Windell
    > www.wandtv.com
    >
    > The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or
    > Microsoft, or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    > -----------------------------------------------------
    >
    >
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Jul 20, 2007
    #6
  7. tempgal

    tempgal Guest

    Thank you, Gentlemen.

    My "OK" situation fell apart soon after posting as the following morning,
    absolutely nothing worked -- no Internet, no file sharing between the two
    computers, and no ability to access the router configuration. Have reset
    the router and reconfigured everything more times than I care to count. At
    the moment, I am connected to the Internet but neither computer can see the
    shared files on the other.

    The router software is DD-WRT .23SP2, and I've concluded that whatever
    success I first enjoyed must have been dumb luck. I simply don't know what
    entries are to be made in the configuration section and have been to every
    forum mentioned but apparently my questions are just too elemental to be
    answered, at least not yet.

    Regarding the WEP, at one point today I reconfigured that, only to find that
    I was unable to connect at all with the configuration and once again had to
    reset, so I am again without security.

    Obviously I overestimated my ability to get this thing going.

    I really need a step-by-step configuration tutorial to configure the Buffalo
    WHR-HP-G54 router as an Access Point with DD-WRT. The links provided in
    this thread just didn't go as far as I need.

    I appreciate your time and efforts on my behalf.

    tempgal


    "tempgal" <> wrote in message
    news:ei%...
    > Hi --
    >
    > Please still be gentle. I'm making progress but am not a real techie yet.
    >
    > My Internet connection is via wired router. As of today, I also have
    > connected a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router with DD-WRT which is configured as
    > an access point so that I can use my notebook computer downstairs and
    > outside on the deck. The Buffalo has an original name and a new user name
    > and password. I understand that it is best to not broadcast the name but
    > I did leave it visible for the time being. I chose WEP security but can
    > upgrade to a stronger security option.
    >
    > What concerns me is that when my router name appeared in the list of
    > available wireless networks around my home, it was described as UNSECURED
    > and the usual window appeared asking me if I wanted to connect to an
    > unsecured network. Why would it be seen as unsecured? Shouldn't I have
    > been required to login with a user name and password to connect? Would
    > the fact that my wired router was already connected to the desktop
    > computer where I had already logged in have any bearing? Is there a way
    > to make logging in to the wireless network a requirement?
    >
    > Any suggestions/further coaching would be very much appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    tempgal, Jul 20, 2007
    #7
  8. tempgal

    Lem Guest

    tempgal wrote:
    > Thank you, Gentlemen.
    >
    > My "OK" situation fell apart soon after posting as the following morning,
    > absolutely nothing worked -- no Internet, no file sharing between the two
    > computers, and no ability to access the router configuration. Have reset
    > the router and reconfigured everything more times than I care to count. At
    > the moment, I am connected to the Internet but neither computer can see the
    > shared files on the other.
    >
    > The router software is DD-WRT .23SP2, and I've concluded that whatever
    > success I first enjoyed must have been dumb luck. I simply don't know what
    > entries are to be made in the configuration section and have been to every
    > forum mentioned but apparently my questions are just too elemental to be
    > answered, at least not yet.
    >
    > Regarding the WEP, at one point today I reconfigured that, only to find that
    > I was unable to connect at all with the configuration and once again had to
    > reset, so I am again without security.
    >
    > Obviously I overestimated my ability to get this thing going.
    >
    > I really need a step-by-step configuration tutorial to configure the Buffalo
    > WHR-HP-G54 router as an Access Point with DD-WRT. The links provided in
    > this thread just didn't go as far as I need.
    >
    > I appreciate your time and efforts on my behalf.
    >
    > tempgal
    >
    >
    > "tempgal" <> wrote in message
    > news:ei%...
    >> Hi --
    >>
    >> Please still be gentle. I'm making progress but am not a real techie yet.
    >>
    >> My Internet connection is via wired router. As of today, I also have
    >> connected a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router with DD-WRT which is configured as
    >> an access point so that I can use my notebook computer downstairs and
    >> outside on the deck. The Buffalo has an original name and a new user name
    >> and password. I understand that it is best to not broadcast the name but
    >> I did leave it visible for the time being. I chose WEP security but can
    >> upgrade to a stronger security option.
    >>
    >> What concerns me is that when my router name appeared in the list of
    >> available wireless networks around my home, it was described as UNSECURED
    >> and the usual window appeared asking me if I wanted to connect to an
    >> unsecured network. Why would it be seen as unsecured? Shouldn't I have
    >> been required to login with a user name and password to connect? Would
    >> the fact that my wired router was already connected to the desktop
    >> computer where I had already logged in have any bearing? Is there a way
    >> to make logging in to the wireless network a requirement?
    >>
    >> Any suggestions/further coaching would be very much appreciated.
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >


    tempgal,

    It's actually easier to do than to write out instructions. I have to go
    out for a while, but I'll write more either later tonight or tomorrow.
    In the meantime, check out Jack's site, www.ezlan.net. There is a lot
    of explanatory material there.

    In general, it's easier to setup wireless networks if you do it first
    with NO wireless encryption. Once that works, you add the security.

    You need to know how to access the router's configuration utility. Do
    this by temporarily connecting your computer to the router (that is, the
    Buffalo) using an ethernet cable. After the router is properly
    configured, you can then disconnect the cable and use the wireless
    connection.

    For more detailed directions, we need to know:
    What version of Windows you're using, and if XP, what Service Pack.
    What device is in the notebook that connects wirelessly (at least,
    what's the make/model of the notebook, if it is using a built-in
    wireless capability).

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    Lem, Jul 20, 2007
    #8
  9. tempgal

    tempgal Guest

    Lem --

    I've been to Jack's site, even before I posted here. It just doesn't give
    me enough info.

    The desktop computer has Windows XP Pro, SP2, everything up to date. The
    router on that is a wired Westell 2200 from Bellsouth.
    The notebook computer is a HP ZX5000. The operating is Windows XP Home,
    SP2, everything up to date. It does have built-in wireless access.

    I have been doing all configuring from the notebook computer. Every time I
    want to go back into the configuration I have to do a hard reset on the
    wireless router.

    Here is a link to the various configuration screens as they appear in
    default. http://bellsouthpwp2.net/t/e/tempgal/data/DD-WRT Config.pdf

    When I access other wireless networks apparently belonging to my neighbors,
    everything works exactly as it should.

    Thanks for your patience and assistance.

    Zan


    "Lem" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > tempgal wrote:
    >> Thank you, Gentlemen.
    >>
    >> My "OK" situation fell apart soon after posting as the following morning,
    >> absolutely nothing worked -- no Internet, no file sharing between the two
    >> computers, and no ability to access the router configuration. Have reset
    >> the router and reconfigured everything more times than I care to count.
    >> At the moment, I am connected to the Internet but neither computer can
    >> see the shared files on the other.
    >>
    >> The router software is DD-WRT .23SP2, and I've concluded that whatever
    >> success I first enjoyed must have been dumb luck. I simply don't know
    >> what entries are to be made in the configuration section and have been to
    >> every forum mentioned but apparently my questions are just too elemental
    >> to be answered, at least not yet.
    >>
    >> Regarding the WEP, at one point today I reconfigured that, only to find
    >> that I was unable to connect at all with the configuration and once again
    >> had to reset, so I am again without security.
    >>
    >> Obviously I overestimated my ability to get this thing going.
    >>
    >> I really need a step-by-step configuration tutorial to configure the
    >> Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router as an Access Point with DD-WRT. The links
    >> provided in this thread just didn't go as far as I need.
    >>
    >> I appreciate your time and efforts on my behalf.
    >>
    >> tempgal
    >>
    >>
    >> "tempgal" <> wrote in message
    >> news:ei%...
    >>> Hi --
    >>>
    >>> Please still be gentle. I'm making progress but am not a real techie
    >>> yet.
    >>>
    >>> My Internet connection is via wired router. As of today, I also have
    >>> connected a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router with DD-WRT which is configured as
    >>> an access point so that I can use my notebook computer downstairs and
    >>> outside on the deck. The Buffalo has an original name and a new user
    >>> name and password. I understand that it is best to not broadcast the
    >>> name but I did leave it visible for the time being. I chose WEP
    >>> security but can upgrade to a stronger security option.
    >>>
    >>> What concerns me is that when my router name appeared in the list of
    >>> available wireless networks around my home, it was described as
    >>> UNSECURED and the usual window appeared asking me if I wanted to connect
    >>> to an unsecured network. Why would it be seen as unsecured? Shouldn't
    >>> I have been required to login with a user name and password to connect?
    >>> Would the fact that my wired router was already connected to the desktop
    >>> computer where I had already logged in have any bearing? Is there a way
    >>> to make logging in to the wireless network a requirement?
    >>>
    >>> Any suggestions/further coaching would be very much appreciated.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    > tempgal,
    >
    > It's actually easier to do than to write out instructions. I have to go
    > out for a while, but I'll write more either later tonight or tomorrow. In
    > the meantime, check out Jack's site, www.ezlan.net. There is a lot of
    > explanatory material there.
    >
    > In general, it's easier to setup wireless networks if you do it first with
    > NO wireless encryption. Once that works, you add the security.
    >
    > You need to know how to access the router's configuration utility. Do
    > this by temporarily connecting your computer to the router (that is, the
    > Buffalo) using an ethernet cable. After the router is properly
    > configured, you can then disconnect the cable and use the wireless
    > connection.
    >
    > For more detailed directions, we need to know:
    > What version of Windows you're using, and if XP, what Service Pack.
    > What device is in the notebook that connects wirelessly (at least, what's
    > the make/model of the notebook, if it is using a built-in wireless
    > capability).
    >
    > --
    > Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    tempgal, Jul 20, 2007
    #9
  10. tempgal

    Lem Guest

    tempgal --

    This is a long post. I tend to get wordy. You'll probably want to
    print it out. Even with the length, however, there are
    oversimplifications and omissions. I'll try not to leave out anything
    important.

    Preliminaries

    As Jack noted, third-party firmware like DD-WRT enables access to
    functions that the hardware is capable of but that are not made
    available by the stock firmware. One downside to this is that you can't
    use the User Guide provided by the router manufacturer (Buffalo). There
    is, however, a wiki and a forum for DD-WRT firmware:

    DD-WRT main http://www.dd-wrt.com/dd-wrtv2/index.php
    DD-WRT wiki http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Main_Page
    DD-WRT forum http://www.dd-wrt.com/phpBB2/

    Another consideration of using DD-WRT is that it gives you a lot more
    options from which to choose. Although this can be good if you need
    some of the more esoteric functions, it also makes things more complex
    for beginners.

    As Phillip Windell suggested, configuring a wireless router "as an
    access point" is not as straight-forward as you might think. In
    particular, if your router's "wireless mode" says "AP," that DOES NOT
    MEAN (necessarily) that your router is "configured as an access point."
    In fact, "AP" is the default mode; this just means that the Buffalo is
    operating in "normal" wireless router mode.

    Background

    In order for computers and other devices to communicate over networks,
    each device has to have a unique address. In the most common addressing
    scheme in use today, network addresses are written as four numbers, each
    from 0 to 255, separated by dots. They are called "IP addresses" (for
    Internet Protocol). For example, if you direct your browser to
    http://www.whatismyip.com/ you will find the IP address assigned to you
    by your ISP. As I write this, my IP address is 66.28.217.228. These
    days, most ISPs assign "dynamic" IP addresses, which simply means that
    each time you connect to your ISP you are NOT guaranteed to get the same
    IP address as you had the last time (although, in many cases, it does
    stay the same).

    Some ranges of IP addresses are reserved for use as internal (local area
    network or LAN) addresses. I believe that the range used by both your
    Westell and Buffalo routers is 192.168.1.1 through 192.168.1.255. As
    far as the rest of the Internet is concerned, all of your computers have
    only a single address -- the one assigned by your ISP. When you have
    more than one computer on your local network (LAN), how does the
    information get to and from the proper computers? The answer is that
    the router performs a "Network Address Translation" (NAT) function.

    That is, the router knows that your notebook has, for example, been
    assigned local address 192.168.1.100 and your desktop has been assigned
    local address 192.168.1.101. When traffic comes over the Internet to
    your ISP-assigned address, the router determines which of your local
    computers is supposed to get the info, and directs it accordingly. The
    router performs this translation between its WAN port (the jack that's
    usually connected to a DSL or cable modem) and its LAN ports (the jacks
    that are connected to your computers). In the Westell, the "WAN port"
    is internal, because the modem is combined with the router inside the box.

    The hardware devices that you have are actually multi-function devices.
    The Westell combines 3 functions: it is a modem (which translates
    electrical signals on your DSL wire to IP packets and vice versa); it is
    a router (which performs the NAT function described above); and it is a
    switch (which connects up to 4 computers to each other and to the
    "local" side of the router). The Buffalo also combines 3 functions: it
    is a router; a switch; and a wireless access point. The wireless access
    point can be thought of as a switch that adds additional connections to
    the 4 switched LAN ports. Instead of having a 4-port switch, you have a
    switch with over 30 ports, most of which are wirelessly connected.

    Both the Westell and the Buffalo have a component that can automatically
    assign IP addresses to computers (or other devices) connected to their
    switches. This is called a DHCP server. A DHCP server usually can be
    configured to assign IP addresses in a certain range.

    You DO NOT WANT to have two DHCP servers on the same LAN. You also DO
    NOT WANT to have two NAT routers connected to each other. Thus, in
    order to use both your Westell and your Buffalo, you must turn off one
    of the DHCP servers and bypass one of the NAT routers. For simplicity
    (!) we are going to leave the Westell alone, and turn off the Buffalo
    DHCP server and bypass the Buffalo NAT router.

    Information Gathering

    You need to know some IP address information from the Westell. The
    easiest way to determine this is to connect a computer to the Westell
    using an Ethernet cable. Open a Command Prompt window and type
    "ipconfig /all" (without quotes) and press Enter. Included in the
    information displayed will be:

    IP Address
    Subnet Mask
    Default Gateway
    DHCP Server
    DNS Server

    The IP address is the address assigned to your computer by the DHCP
    server in the Westell. The subnet mask will be 255.255.255.0. If it is
    anything else, or if the third number of the IP address is anything
    other than 1, post back, because I'll have to change some directions.

    The Default Gateway, DHCP Server, and DNS Server are probably all the
    same. The value will probably be 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.1.254.
    Whatever this address is, it is the address of the Westell itself, and
    if you enter it into a browser on a computer connected to the Westell,
    you will access the Westell's configuration utility.

    From what I've been able to determine on the 'net, the Westell's IP
    address probably is 192.168.1.254, and its DHCP server probably is set
    to assign addresses in the range 192.168.1.1 through 192.168.1.253.
    That's slightly unfortunate, because we're going to want to manually
    assign an address to the Buffalo, and it can't be one that gets assigned
    automatically. If you're comfortable going into the Westell's
    configuration utility, you can reset the DHCP server to a smaller range
    (say, 192.168.1.100 through 192.168.1.102, which would let you connect
    up to 3 computers), but this is not absolutely necessary. (See
    http://i.dslr.net/pics/faqs/image11618.gif)
    If you don't want to, or can't, get into the Westell configuration
    utility, we'll just use 192.168.1.50, which is not likely to be assigned
    by the Westell DHCP server.

    How-to (finally)

    Turn off your notebook and the Buffalo.
    Connect the notebook to the Buffalo with an Ethernet cable. Connect the
    cable to one of the 4 LAN jacks. DO NOT connect anything to the WAN
    jack on the Buffalo.
    Turn on the Buffalo and wait until the lights stabilize (about a minute
    or two). Boot up the notebook.
    Open a browser and enter 192.168.1.1. This is the address of the
    Buffalo router, and you should see the DD-WRT Control Panel.
    http://www.informatione.gmxhome.de/DDWRT/Standard/V23final/index.html

    If you look at the sample page I've linked above and compare it to yours:

    SSID (shown as linksys): should be the "original name" assigned to your
    network. This should be a name that you will recognize as yours, but it
    shouldn't be your last name or address.
    Mode (shown as AP): should be AP
    Network (shown as mixed): could be mixed, but preferably should be G-only
    DHCP Server (shown as Enabled): should be Disabled.

    Click the "Setup" tab. You should get the login screen where you enter
    the "new user name and password" assigned to your Buffalo router.
    You'll then go to the Basic Setup screen:
    http://www.informatione.gmxhome.de/DDWRT/Standard/V23final/index-2.html

    About halfway down the page, under "Network Address Server Settings
    (DHCP)" click the radio button to Disable the DHCP server. You can also
    set the Time Zone on this page if you want. You will also change the
    Local IP address -- but not now. For now, after you have disabled the
    DHCP server and perhaps set the time, click Save Settings.

    I can't recall if clicking "Save Settings" causes the router to re-boot.
    If it does, wait until it stabilizes and then access it again through
    your web browser. You may have to do this each time you "Save Settings."

    Click the "Wireless" tab. You should see the Wireless "Basic Settings"
    screen:
    http://www.informatione.gmxhome.de/DDWRT/Standard/V23final/Wireless_Basic.html
    "Wireless mode" should be AP
    Assuming that the wireless adapter in your notebook is a "wireless G"
    device, as most are these days, set "Wireless network mode" to G-only.
    Here's where you set your wireless network name (SSID). Leave SSID
    broadcast to Enable.
    You can leave the "Wireless channel" set to 6. If you are in an area
    with lots of other wireless networks, you may get better results if you
    come back to this page and change to channel 1 or channel 11.
    Click Save Settings.

    Click the "Wireless Security" tab:
    http://www.informatione.gmxhome.de/DDWRT/Standard/V23final/WL_WPATable.html
    Make sure (for now) that the drop-down box says Disable. Click Save
    Settings.

    Go back to the Basic Setup page. Under the heading "Network Setup"
    and then under "Router IP" change the "Local IP Address" to 192.168.1.50
    (remember the discussion above?). If you have configured the Westell
    DHCP server to assign a limited range of IP addresses, the Local IP
    Address of the Buffalo can be set to any address that has the same first
    3 numbers (192.168.1) and where the 4th number is: (a) NOT the same as
    the Westell's IP address, (b) outside of the range assigned by the
    Westell DHCP server, and (c) NOT 255. WRITE THIS ADDRESS DOWN AND KEEP
    IT IN THE SAME PLACE THAT YOU HAVE RECORDED THE BUFFALO'S USER NAME AND
    PASSWORD. Click Save Settings.

    From now on, when you want to access the Buffalo's configuration
    utility, you will have to enter its new Local IP Address in your browser.

    You have now disabled the Buffalo's DHCP server. Bypassing the Buffalo
    NAT router is easy: just don't connect anything to the Buffalo's WAN
    port. (There is a way ...
    http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless_Access_Point)

    Turn off your notebook. Leaving the notebook connected by Ethernet
    cable to one of the Buffalo's LAN ports, connect a second Ethernet cable
    between a LAN port on the Westell and a LAN port on the Buffalo. Boot
    up your notebook. You should be able to connect to the Internet: your
    notebook should be getting its LAN IP address, as well as its Default
    Gateway, DHCP Server, and DNS server info from the Westell.

    Disconnect the Ethernet cable between your notebook and the Buffalo. If
    it isn't already turned on, turn on the wireless adapter in your
    notebook. Open the View Available Wireless Networks screen. It should
    look like this:
    http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/sc...Connection/View_Wireless_Networks/Index.shtml
    (instead of NETGEAR, you should see your SSID). You should be able to
    connect to your wireless network and get to the Internet.

    If all is OK so far, turn off your notebook, reconnect it with the
    Ethernet cable to the Buffalo LAN port, and reboot. Connect to the
    DD-WRT configuration system (don't forget to use the new IP address
    192.168.1.50). Click the "Wireless" tab and then the "Wireless
    Security" tab. You should see:
    http://www.informatione.gmxhome.de/DDWRT/Standard/V23final/WL_WPATable.html
    Now change the drop-down box. What you set this to depends on the
    capability of the wireless adapter in your notebook. If it is
    relatively recent, it should be capable of WPA2. Set the drop-down box
    to "WPA2 Pre-Shared Key Only." Set the encryption option to AES.

    If the wireless adapter in your notebook is only capable of WPA, set the
    drop-down box to "WPA Pre-Shared Key." Enter a password in the WPA
    Shared Key field between 8 and 63 characters long. A "strong" password
    will have a mix of letters and non-letter characters, and will not be a
    dictionary word.

    Click Save Settings. Disconnect the Ethernet cable and re-boot your
    notebook.

    This time, when you get to the Choose a Wireless Network screen, Windows
    should show your SSID as a "Secured wireless network." Under "Related
    tasks" on the left side of the window, click "change the order of
    preferred networks." You should see the Wireless Network Connection
    Properties dialog, open to the Wireless Networks tab:
    http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/sc...tion/Properties/Wireless_Networks/Index.shtml
    Your wireless network should be listed under Preferred Networks (you
    might consider Removing any other networks from this list). Highlight
    your network and click Properties. On the next screen, set
    "Authentication" to WPA2-PSK (if available) or otherwise to WPA-PSK. Set
    the "Data Encryption" to the same thing you set it to in the Buffalo
    (AES or TKIP). Enter the network key that you set in the router. In
    general, see
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/community/columns/cableguy/cg0505.mspx

    OK your way out, and you now should be able to connect to your secure
    wireless network.

    Good luck, and if you have problems, try to be as specific as possible
    in describing where in the sequence you were when things went wrong, and
    exactly what happened.


    tempgal wrote:
    > Lem --
    >
    > I've been to Jack's site, even before I posted here. It just doesn't give
    > me enough info.
    >
    > The desktop computer has Windows XP Pro, SP2, everything up to date. The
    > router on that is a wired Westell 2200 from Bellsouth.
    > The notebook computer is a HP ZX5000. The operating is Windows XP Home,
    > SP2, everything up to date. It does have built-in wireless access.
    >
    > I have been doing all configuring from the notebook computer. Every time I
    > want to go back into the configuration I have to do a hard reset on the
    > wireless router.
    >
    > Here is a link to the various configuration screens as they appear in
    > default. http://bellsouthpwp2.net/t/e/tempgal/data/DD-WRT Config.pdf
    >
    > When I access other wireless networks apparently belonging to my neighbors,
    > everything works exactly as it should.
    >
    > Thanks for your patience and assistance.
    >
    > Zan
    >
    >
    > "Lem" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> tempgal wrote:
    >>> Thank you, Gentlemen.
    >>>
    >>> My "OK" situation fell apart soon after posting as the following morning,
    >>> absolutely nothing worked -- no Internet, no file sharing between the two
    >>> computers, and no ability to access the router configuration. Have reset
    >>> the router and reconfigured everything more times than I care to count.
    >>> At the moment, I am connected to the Internet but neither computer can
    >>> see the shared files on the other.
    >>>
    >>> The router software is DD-WRT .23SP2, and I've concluded that whatever
    >>> success I first enjoyed must have been dumb luck. I simply don't know
    >>> what entries are to be made in the configuration section and have been to
    >>> every forum mentioned but apparently my questions are just too elemental
    >>> to be answered, at least not yet.
    >>>
    >>> Regarding the WEP, at one point today I reconfigured that, only to find
    >>> that I was unable to connect at all with the configuration and once again
    >>> had to reset, so I am again without security.
    >>>
    >>> Obviously I overestimated my ability to get this thing going.
    >>>
    >>> I really need a step-by-step configuration tutorial to configure the
    >>> Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router as an Access Point with DD-WRT. The links
    >>> provided in this thread just didn't go as far as I need.
    >>>
    >>> I appreciate your time and efforts on my behalf.
    >>>
    >>> tempgal
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "tempgal" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:ei%...
    >>>> Hi --
    >>>>
    >>>> Please still be gentle. I'm making progress but am not a real techie
    >>>> yet.
    >>>>
    >>>> My Internet connection is via wired router. As of today, I also have
    >>>> connected a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router with DD-WRT which is configured as
    >>>> an access point so that I can use my notebook computer downstairs and
    >>>> outside on the deck. The Buffalo has an original name and a new user
    >>>> name and password. I understand that it is best to not broadcast the
    >>>> name but I did leave it visible for the time being. I chose WEP
    >>>> security but can upgrade to a stronger security option.
    >>>>
    >>>> What concerns me is that when my router name appeared in the list of
    >>>> available wireless networks around my home, it was described as
    >>>> UNSECURED and the usual window appeared asking me if I wanted to connect
    >>>> to an unsecured network. Why would it be seen as unsecured? Shouldn't
    >>>> I have been required to login with a user name and password to connect?
    >>>> Would the fact that my wired router was already connected to the desktop
    >>>> computer where I had already logged in have any bearing? Is there a way
    >>>> to make logging in to the wireless network a requirement?
    >>>>
    >>>> Any suggestions/further coaching would be very much appreciated.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >> tempgal,
    >>
    >> It's actually easier to do than to write out instructions. I have to go
    >> out for a while, but I'll write more either later tonight or tomorrow. In
    >> the meantime, check out Jack's site, www.ezlan.net. There is a lot of
    >> explanatory material there.
    >>
    >> In general, it's easier to setup wireless networks if you do it first with
    >> NO wireless encryption. Once that works, you add the security.
    >>
    >> You need to know how to access the router's configuration utility. Do
    >> this by temporarily connecting your computer to the router (that is, the
    >> Buffalo) using an ethernet cable. After the router is properly
    >> configured, you can then disconnect the cable and use the wireless
    >> connection.
    >>
    >> For more detailed directions, we need to know:
    >> What version of Windows you're using, and if XP, what Service Pack.
    >> What device is in the notebook that connects wirelessly (at least, what's
    >> the make/model of the notebook, if it is using a built-in wireless
    >> capability).
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

    >
    >



    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    Lem, Jul 20, 2007
    #10
  11. Hi
    As an opener it is Not clear why you flashed the Router, your info does Not
    include any indication that you need the extras that DD-WRT provides.
    Wireless security is Not a basic Log On with Id and password. It is an
    Encryption key with pass phrase arrangement.
    You should use WPA-AES, it is the most security that is currently, and it is
    actually more stable and take less resources than the old low security
    “clucky” WEP.
    You start with securing your Wireless Router, try to log to it without
    securing the Wireless Client, if you cannot log secure the Client. If you
    can log after you secured the Client then your security is working.
    Whatever the message that comes with the Wireless manager would not matter
    if it is really secured. You do not like the message, reset the Router to
    the original Buffalo firmware and do not play with it and nothing would be
    trashed in the process.
    In general
    It is impossible to find what is wrong with a Network Wireless when users
    tend define everything in terms of connection to the Internet, it makes it
    impossible to provide help since there can be huge amount of unrelated
    settings that are Off and all would result in the same thing. I.e. Not
    having Internet.
    Since End-Users do not have various devices and hardware to be able to
    exchange and try the only way us to isolate the components one at the time.
    Step1. The Computer directly connected to the Wire Router to make sure that
    the wired Router and Internet is working.
    Step 2. Connect the Wireless Router as an Access Point as described here,
    Wireless Router as an AP - http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
    Make sure that the it is working as is without security and other “hooplas”
    then secure it and use it in good health
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "tempgal" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Lem --
    >
    > I've been to Jack's site, even before I posted here. It just doesn't give
    > me enough info.
    >
    > The desktop computer has Windows XP Pro, SP2, everything up to date. The
    > router on that is a wired Westell 2200 from Bellsouth.
    > The notebook computer is a HP ZX5000. The operating is Windows XP Home,
    > SP2, everything up to date. It does have built-in wireless access.
    >
    > I have been doing all configuring from the notebook computer. Every time
    > I want to go back into the configuration I have to do a hard reset on the
    > wireless router.
    >
    > Here is a link to the various configuration screens as they appear in
    > default. http://bellsouthpwp2.net/t/e/tempgal/data/DD-WRT Config.pdf
    >
    > When I access other wireless networks apparently belonging to my
    > neighbors, everything works exactly as it should.
    >
    > Thanks for your patience and assistance.
    >
    > Zan
    >
    >
    > "Lem" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> tempgal wrote:
    >>> Thank you, Gentlemen.
    >>>
    >>> My "OK" situation fell apart soon after posting as the following
    >>> morning, absolutely nothing worked -- no Internet, no file sharing
    >>> between the two computers, and no ability to access the router
    >>> configuration. Have reset the router and reconfigured everything more
    >>> times than I care to count. At the moment, I am connected to the
    >>> Internet but neither computer can see the shared files on the other.
    >>>
    >>> The router software is DD-WRT .23SP2, and I've concluded that whatever
    >>> success I first enjoyed must have been dumb luck. I simply don't know
    >>> what entries are to be made in the configuration section and have been
    >>> to every forum mentioned but apparently my questions are just too
    >>> elemental to be answered, at least not yet.
    >>>
    >>> Regarding the WEP, at one point today I reconfigured that, only to find
    >>> that I was unable to connect at all with the configuration and once
    >>> again had to reset, so I am again without security.
    >>>
    >>> Obviously I overestimated my ability to get this thing going.
    >>>
    >>> I really need a step-by-step configuration tutorial to configure the
    >>> Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router as an Access Point with DD-WRT. The links
    >>> provided in this thread just didn't go as far as I need.
    >>>
    >>> I appreciate your time and efforts on my behalf.
    >>>
    >>> tempgal
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "tempgal" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:ei%...
    >>>> Hi --
    >>>>
    >>>> Please still be gentle. I'm making progress but am not a real techie
    >>>> yet.
    >>>>
    >>>> My Internet connection is via wired router. As of today, I also have
    >>>> connected a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router with DD-WRT which is configured
    >>>> as an access point so that I can use my notebook computer downstairs
    >>>> and outside on the deck. The Buffalo has an original name and a new
    >>>> user name and password. I understand that it is best to not broadcast
    >>>> the name but I did leave it visible for the time being. I chose WEP
    >>>> security but can upgrade to a stronger security option.
    >>>>
    >>>> What concerns me is that when my router name appeared in the list of
    >>>> available wireless networks around my home, it was described as
    >>>> UNSECURED and the usual window appeared asking me if I wanted to
    >>>> connect to an unsecured network. Why would it be seen as unsecured?
    >>>> Shouldn't I have been required to login with a user name and password
    >>>> to connect? Would the fact that my wired router was already connected
    >>>> to the desktop computer where I had already logged in have any bearing?
    >>>> Is there a way to make logging in to the wireless network a
    >>>> requirement?
    >>>>
    >>>> Any suggestions/further coaching would be very much appreciated.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> tempgal,
    >>
    >> It's actually easier to do than to write out instructions. I have to go
    >> out for a while, but I'll write more either later tonight or tomorrow. In
    >> the meantime, check out Jack's site, www.ezlan.net. There is a lot of
    >> explanatory material there.
    >>
    >> In general, it's easier to setup wireless networks if you do it first
    >> with NO wireless encryption. Once that works, you add the security.
    >>
    >> You need to know how to access the router's configuration utility. Do
    >> this by temporarily connecting your computer to the router (that is, the
    >> Buffalo) using an ethernet cable. After the router is properly
    >> configured, you can then disconnect the cable and use the wireless
    >> connection.
    >>
    >> For more detailed directions, we need to know:
    >> What version of Windows you're using, and if XP, what Service Pack.
    >> What device is in the notebook that connects wirelessly (at least, what's
    >> the make/model of the notebook, if it is using a built-in wireless
    >> capability).
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

    >
    >
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Jul 20, 2007
    #11
  12. tempgal

    tempgal Guest

    Gentlemen --

    My problem is FIXED. It was so simple that I am ashamed to tell you of my
    stupid mistake.

    I thank you for the tremendous amount of support.

    Zan


    "tempgal" <> wrote in message
    news:ei%...
    > Hi --
    >
    > Please still be gentle. I'm making progress but am not a real techie yet.
    >
    > My Internet connection is via wired router. As of today, I also have
    > connected a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router with DD-WRT which is configured as
    > an access point so that I can use my notebook computer downstairs and
    > outside on the deck. The Buffalo has an original name and a new user name
    > and password. I understand that it is best to not broadcast the name but
    > I did leave it visible for the time being. I chose WEP security but can
    > upgrade to a stronger security option.
    >
    > What concerns me is that when my router name appeared in the list of
    > available wireless networks around my home, it was described as UNSECURED
    > and the usual window appeared asking me if I wanted to connect to an
    > unsecured network. Why would it be seen as unsecured? Shouldn't I have
    > been required to login with a user name and password to connect? Would
    > the fact that my wired router was already connected to the desktop
    > computer where I had already logged in have any bearing? Is there a way
    > to make logging in to the wireless network a requirement?
    >
    > Any suggestions/further coaching would be very much appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    tempgal, Jul 20, 2007
    #12
  13. tempgal

    Lem Guest

    Oh, come on. We won't laugh.

    But print out my long post anyway. It'll help someday.

    tempgal wrote:
    > Gentlemen --
    >
    > My problem is FIXED. It was so simple that I am ashamed to tell you of my
    > stupid mistake.
    >
    > I thank you for the tremendous amount of support.
    >
    > Zan
    >
    >
    > "tempgal" <> wrote in message
    > news:ei%...
    >> Hi --
    >>
    >> Please still be gentle. I'm making progress but am not a real techie yet.
    >>
    >> My Internet connection is via wired router. As of today, I also have
    >> connected a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router with DD-WRT which is configured as
    >> an access point so that I can use my notebook computer downstairs and
    >> outside on the deck. The Buffalo has an original name and a new user name
    >> and password. I understand that it is best to not broadcast the name but
    >> I did leave it visible for the time being. I chose WEP security but can
    >> upgrade to a stronger security option.
    >>
    >> What concerns me is that when my router name appeared in the list of
    >> available wireless networks around my home, it was described as UNSECURED
    >> and the usual window appeared asking me if I wanted to connect to an
    >> unsecured network. Why would it be seen as unsecured? Shouldn't I have
    >> been required to login with a user name and password to connect? Would
    >> the fact that my wired router was already connected to the desktop
    >> computer where I had already logged in have any bearing? Is there a way
    >> to make logging in to the wireless network a requirement?
    >>
    >> Any suggestions/further coaching would be very much appreciated.
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >



    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    Lem, Jul 20, 2007
    #13
  14. tempgal

    tempgal Guest

    I DID print it ... because I know it WILL help me someday. It is all
    punched and inserted in a notebook where I keep such things. Believe it or
    not, I do often help a lot of folks with computer problems because they
    think I know more than them. LOL to that!

    While going over yet again the pathetic instructions for the original
    Buffalo firmware and trying to relate it to the DD-WRT firmware, I noticed
    that once you got the router configured and rebooted the computer, the cable
    was supposed to be connected Buffalo LAN to Westell LAN. I had left the
    Buffalo connection in the WAN.

    I didn't flash the Buffalo myself. It was "professionally" flashed when I
    bought it. The DD-WRT wasn't supposed to do anything different, but rather,
    enhance the capabilities that were already there. After all my efforts, the
    only thing that needed to be done to make this work was to uncheck one item
    to disable the DHCP server, then plug in the connectors correctly. All
    other entries, such as changing the router name, etc. were optional.
    Internet access, file sharing, etc. now all work perfectly.

    Since you help so many people, thought you might want to know these details
    in the event that someone presents a similar problem.

    Thanks and regards,

    Zan






    "Lem" <> wrote in message
    news:%231%...
    > Oh, come on. We won't laugh.
    >
    > But print out my long post anyway. It'll help someday.
    >
    > tempgal wrote:
    >> Gentlemen --
    >>
    >> My problem is FIXED. It was so simple that I am ashamed to tell you of
    >> my stupid mistake.
    >>
    >> I thank you for the tremendous amount of support.
    >>
    >> Zan
    >>
    >>
    >> "tempgal" <> wrote in message
    >> news:ei%...
    >>> Hi --
    >>>
    >>> Please still be gentle. I'm making progress but am not a real techie
    >>> yet.
    >>>
    >>> My Internet connection is via wired router. As of today, I also have
    >>> connected a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router with DD-WRT which is configured as
    >>> an access point so that I can use my notebook computer downstairs and
    >>> outside on the deck. The Buffalo has an original name and a new user
    >>> name and password. I understand that it is best to not broadcast the
    >>> name but I did leave it visible for the time being. I chose WEP
    >>> security but can upgrade to a stronger security option.
    >>>
    >>> What concerns me is that when my router name appeared in the list of
    >>> available wireless networks around my home, it was described as
    >>> UNSECURED and the usual window appeared asking me if I wanted to connect
    >>> to an unsecured network. Why would it be seen as unsecured? Shouldn't
    >>> I have been required to login with a user name and password to connect?
    >>> Would the fact that my wired router was already connected to the desktop
    >>> computer where I had already logged in have any bearing? Is there a way
    >>> to make logging in to the wireless network a requirement?
    >>>
    >>> Any suggestions/further coaching would be very much appreciated.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > --
    > Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    tempgal, Jul 20, 2007
    #14
  15. tempgal

    Lem Guest

    Glad things worked out for you. I figured that you had bought the
    Buffalo "pre-flashed" given the web pages you linked to.

    Lem


    tempgal wrote:
    > I DID print it ... because I know it WILL help me someday. It is all
    > punched and inserted in a notebook where I keep such things. Believe it or
    > not, I do often help a lot of folks with computer problems because they
    > think I know more than them. LOL to that!
    >
    > While going over yet again the pathetic instructions for the original
    > Buffalo firmware and trying to relate it to the DD-WRT firmware, I noticed
    > that once you got the router configured and rebooted the computer, the cable
    > was supposed to be connected Buffalo LAN to Westell LAN. I had left the
    > Buffalo connection in the WAN.
    >
    > I didn't flash the Buffalo myself. It was "professionally" flashed when I
    > bought it. The DD-WRT wasn't supposed to do anything different, but rather,
    > enhance the capabilities that were already there. After all my efforts, the
    > only thing that needed to be done to make this work was to uncheck one item
    > to disable the DHCP server, then plug in the connectors correctly. All
    > other entries, such as changing the router name, etc. were optional.
    > Internet access, file sharing, etc. now all work perfectly.
    >
    > Since you help so many people, thought you might want to know these details
    > in the event that someone presents a similar problem.
    >
    > Thanks and regards,
    >
    > Zan
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Lem" <> wrote in message
    > news:%231%...
    >> Oh, come on. We won't laugh.
    >>
    >> But print out my long post anyway. It'll help someday.
    >>
    >> tempgal wrote:
    >>> Gentlemen --
    >>>
    >>> My problem is FIXED. It was so simple that I am ashamed to tell you of
    >>> my stupid mistake.
    >>>
    >>> I thank you for the tremendous amount of support.
    >>>
    >>> Zan
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "tempgal" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:ei%...
    >>>> Hi --
    >>>>
    >>>> Please still be gentle. I'm making progress but am not a real techie
    >>>> yet.
    >>>>
    >>>> My Internet connection is via wired router. As of today, I also have
    >>>> connected a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 router with DD-WRT which is configured as
    >>>> an access point so that I can use my notebook computer downstairs and
    >>>> outside on the deck. The Buffalo has an original name and a new user
    >>>> name and password. I understand that it is best to not broadcast the
    >>>> name but I did leave it visible for the time being. I chose WEP
    >>>> security but can upgrade to a stronger security option.
    >>>>
    >>>> What concerns me is that when my router name appeared in the list of
    >>>> available wireless networks around my home, it was described as
    >>>> UNSECURED and the usual window appeared asking me if I wanted to connect
    >>>> to an unsecured network. Why would it be seen as unsecured? Shouldn't
    >>>> I have been required to login with a user name and password to connect?
    >>>> Would the fact that my wired router was already connected to the desktop
    >>>> computer where I had already logged in have any bearing? Is there a way
    >>>> to make logging in to the wireless network a requirement?
    >>>>
    >>>> Any suggestions/further coaching would be very much appreciated.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

    >
    >



    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    Lem, Jul 20, 2007
    #15
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