Computer/software features in a digital camera

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Joe, Jul 11, 2004.

  1. Joe

    Joe Guest

    Computer/software features in a digital camera.

    I have my first digital camera that has any features. It is a Canon
    PowerShot S1 IS. One thing I noticed is a feature called Photo
    Effects. The Photo Effects feature has options called Vivid, Neutral,
    Low Sharpening, Sepia and B/W.

    My thinking is that these are really just software features built into
    the camera and are actually useless. I believe that I would be better
    off leaving that control alone, taking the shot with that
    control/feature in the off position and if I want to add those
    effects, do it with software on the computer at a later time.

    Any help understanding this would be appreciated.

    Thanks

    Joe
    Joe, Jul 11, 2004
    #1
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  2. Joe <> writes:
    > Computer/software features in a digital camera.
    >
    > I have my first digital camera that has any features. It is a Canon
    > PowerShot S1 IS. One thing I noticed is a feature called Photo
    > Effects. The Photo Effects feature has options called Vivid, Neutral,
    > Low Sharpening, Sepia and B/W.
    >
    > My thinking is that these are really just software features built
    > into the camera and are actually useless. I believe that I would be
    > better off leaving that control alone, taking the shot with that
    > control/feature in the off position and if I want to add those
    > effects, do it with software on the computer at a later time.
    >
    > Any help understanding this would be appreciated.


    You've got it mostly right.

    The only one I would consider is "low sharpening" (assuming that this
    setting gives you lower sharpening than the default setting).
    Sharpening is lossy, so if you intend to do a lot of post-processing,
    you should have in-camera sharpening sett to minimum (and sharpen
    yourself after you've done the other adjustments). On the other hand,
    if you just want to print directly from the camera - in-camera
    sharpening is probably what you want.

    All the others, I'd leave alone - in particular: if you want
    monochrome (sepia or B&W) you are much better off doing it
    yourself where you can tune the conversion for best results.

    Btw. If you set your camera to capture RAW (instead of JPEG),
    all sort of in-camera software adjustments will be turned off
    by definition (RAW is the data as captured by the sensor), so
    RAW is the mode that will give the most latitude for post-processing
    work. Many find RAW a bit of overkill for casual work, tho'.
    --
    - gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
    ========================================================================
    «To live outside the law, you must be honest.» (Bob Dylan)
    Gisle Hannemyr, Jul 11, 2004
    #2
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  3. Joe

    Joe Guest

    On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 15:47:57 +0200, Gisle Hannemyr
    <> wrote:

    >Joe <> writes:
    >> Computer/software features in a digital camera.
    >>
    >> I have my first digital camera that has any features. It is a Canon
    >> PowerShot S1 IS. One thing I noticed is a feature called Photo
    >> Effects. The Photo Effects feature has options called Vivid, Neutral,
    >> Low Sharpening, Sepia and B/W.
    >>
    >> My thinking is that these are really just software features built
    >> into the camera and are actually useless. I believe that I would be
    >> better off leaving that control alone, taking the shot with that
    >> control/feature in the off position and if I want to add those
    >> effects, do it with software on the computer at a later time.
    >>
    >> Any help understanding this would be appreciated.

    >
    >You've got it mostly right.
    >
    >The only one I would consider is "low sharpening" (assuming that this
    >setting gives you lower sharpening than the default setting).
    >Sharpening is lossy, so if you intend to do a lot of post-processing,
    >you should have in-camera sharpening sett to minimum (and sharpen
    >yourself after you've done the other adjustments). On the other hand,
    >if you just want to print directly from the camera - in-camera
    >sharpening is probably what you want.
    >
    >All the others, I'd leave alone - in particular: if you want
    >monochrome (sepia or B&W) you are much better off doing it
    >yourself where you can tune the conversion for best results.
    >
    >Btw. If you set your camera to capture RAW (instead of JPEG),
    >all sort of in-camera software adjustments will be turned off
    >by definition (RAW is the data as captured by the sensor), so
    >RAW is the mode that will give the most latitude for post-processing
    >work. Many find RAW a bit of overkill for casual work, tho'.


    Thanks for the explanation.

    I will keep it all in mind as I go forward.

    There really is a lot to learn

    Thanks

    Joe
    Joe, Jul 13, 2004
    #3
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