Computer repairs

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by revirdtaes, Aug 7, 2005.

  1. revirdtaes

    revirdtaes Guest

    Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    Seems a bit of a con to me.
     
    revirdtaes, Aug 7, 2005
    #1
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  2. revirdtaes

    Shane Guest

    On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 11:46:56 +1200, revirdtaes wrote:

    >
    > Does any company actually repair computers and printers, or do they just
    > replace the parts and charge you extra ? Seems a bit of a con to me.


    Its cheaper for you to have them replace parts rather than fix them in
    most cases
    ie. Tech bills you @$45 an hour,ie. if a modem takes 3 hours to fix, you
    could (in most cases) have replaced it at far less, modems retail at
    around $20.00


    --
    Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked

    The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.
     
    Shane, Aug 7, 2005
    #2
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  3. "revirdtaes" <> wrote in message
    news:QZbJe.863$...
    >
    > Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    > or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    > Seems a bit of a con to me.
    >


    I recall on tv last year they doctored an old pc so that it had a faulty
    power switch then tested 3 computer repair firms - from memory , none
    located the error and most recommended motherboard or computer replacement.

    These days, components are so cheap this is just the way it is. Remember
    just 10 years ago, an avg pc would cost 3k, in todays money that would be 5k
    maybe so it was worthwhile investigating faults in more detail.
     
    news.xtra.co.nz, Aug 7, 2005
    #3
  4. "revirdtaes" <> wrote:

    >Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    >or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    >Seems a bit of a con to me.


    I'm unclear how a computer or printer with actual hardware problems
    would be repaired without parts being replaced. Obviously, many
    computers have software problems that need to be fixed, rather than
    hardware failures or worn parts that need to be repaired or replaced.

    I can only think of a few examples of computers and printers being
    repaired, rather than worn or failed parts being replaced:

    o Ink-jet printers that sometimes just need a clean and re-lube to
    operate properly

    o CD-ROM drives that sometimes just need a lens-clean

    o Motherboards that just need a few blown capacitors replaced

    But in all those situations, the labour cost of the repair often
    outweighs the likely extra life to be gained from the item.

    So I'm not sure why the replacement of parts seems like a con to you.
    Repair shops charge you extra for those replacement parts because --
    news flash -- it costs them extra to get the parts. The repair company
    will put a mark-up on the parts because it has to act as go-between
    between the end-user and the manufacturer/distributor over any
    warranty issues -- and that is an extra cost to the repair company.

    In a modern computer, if your hard drive controller fails, then you
    probably need to replace your motherboard, because the controller is
    integrated with the motherboard. 12 years ago, the controller was
    probably on a separate i/o card. But the cost of a replacement
    motherboard (provided your RAM, CPU and other parts are compatible
    with what's currently available) is not much more than a replacement
    i/o card would be if the i/o card was a separate item.

    Isolating the problem to one of only a few integrated items, and
    replacing the failed item, is also a little simpler than testing a lot
    of separate items, so there are often savings in labour costs at the
    troubleshooting stage. OK, a failed i/o card was pretty easy to
    identify and replace 12 years ago, so my chosen example wasn't a good
    one, but the principle still applies.

    If you have an older computer, then finding a repair company that will
    replace defective items with second-hand parts is probably a good way
    to go, but be prepared for the repair bill to equal the price of a
    complete replacement second-hand base unit.

    ka kite
    Steve
     
    Steve Marshall, Aug 7, 2005
    #4
  5. On Sun, 7 Aug 2005 11:46:56 +1200, revirdtaes wrote:

    > Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    > or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    > Seems a bit of a con to me.


    There are quite a number of reasons why you need to just install new parts

    1) Hard Drives are sealed units - the manufacturers do not sell parts.
    2) Just how are you going to fix microprocessors?
    3) Getting hold of the actual plans/circuit layouts can be next to
    impossible
    4) Warranty considerations

    and parts are cheap these days..
     
    wogers nemesis, Aug 7, 2005
    #5
  6. revirdtaes

    MarkH Guest

    "revirdtaes" <> wrote in news:QZbJe.863
    $:

    >
    > Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    > or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    > Seems a bit of a con to me.


    Could you explain what sort of repairs and on what sort of computer or
    printer?




    Many times I have advised a customer to buy a new computer instead of
    having me fix the old one. I COULD bill them a couple of hundred buck
    to fix their 6 year old PC, but considering that they couldn't sell it
    for $50 in full working condition it is not very economic to waste money
    on repairs. Of course buying a new computer then paying me to come
    onsite to set it up and transfer data from the old PC will cost them a
    lot more - but the result is a new PC working fine, not a six year old
    PC in running condition (for now).

    The HP authorised repairer for Auckland is Visual Electronics, their
    hourly charge is higher than the price of a cheap inkjet.

    A basic keyboard is worth less than $20, there is no way to repair one
    for a cheaper cost than replacement. The same goes for a mouse.

    A cheap 400W PSU is worth less than $40, repairing will be dearer than
    that.

    If your old 10GB HDD dies, is it worth repairing? A new 40GB 7200RPM
    Seagate HDD with 5 year warranty costs around $100 and an 80GB costs
    around $110. What would it cost to desolder a faulty component on the
    circuit board and then solder on a replacement component?

    A 52x32x32x CD-RW drive can be purchased for under $50, is your 4 year
    old 40x CD-ROM worth repairing if it dies?

    A new motherboard can be bought for less than $100, what would you
    expect it would cost to repair a faulty one?

    How would anyone repair your old SD-RAM module? You can buy 128MB or
    256MB SD-RAM for under $100.

    Would you expect someone to repair a faulty CPU?


    Exactly what type of repair do you believe could be done for a better
    price than replacement?


    --
    Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
    See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 25-June-05)
    "There are 10 types of people, those that
    understand binary and those that don't"
     
    MarkH, Aug 7, 2005
    #6
  7. revirdtaes

    S Roby Guest

    I
    >I can only think of a few examples of computers and printers being
    >repaired, rather than worn or failed parts being replaced:
    >
    > o Ink-jet printers that sometimes just need a clean and re-lube to
    >operate properly
    >
    > o CD-ROM drives that sometimes just need a lens-clean
    >
    > o Motherboards that just need a few blown capacitors replaced
    >

    Ive only ever fixed one CDROM by cleaning the lens, it died not long after:the
    laser was on its last legs.CDROMS are no longer intended to be fixed, just try
    & get parts
    Motherboards can be fixed by replacing caps, but chances are that it may have
    other caps about to die(even an ESR meter wont show these). Why bother when a
    new m/b RETAILS at $140 & one cap failing in teh future will cause more
    problems
    Most of the inkjets I looked at were either
    1)a faulty logic board: why spend hours to fix when a new printer is less than
    $100
    2)HP: a faulty ink cart: easy fix or (Epson) blocked heads, not worth the
    time/cost involved

    Laser printers are also becoming uneconomic to fix.
    For eg: cheap Brother Laser printers its cheaper to buy a new one than replace
    the drum

    Dont forgaet that ANYTHING can be fixed without 'partswaping" IF you are
    willing to pay the costs involved
    Do you really want want to pay $300+ to FIX a CDROM???

    >Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    >or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    >Seems a bit of a con to me.

    What planet are you on. "Replace parts & charge you extra"???
    Just what do you mean.
    Next time you get your car fixed, tell the mechanic to REBUILD the spark
    plugs,REBUILD the oil filter etc etc& not just replace them "& charge you
    extra"
     
    S Roby, Aug 7, 2005
    #7
  8. revirdtaes

    steve Guest

    revirdtaes wrote:

    >
    > Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    > or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    > Seems a bit of a con to me.


    It's easier and cheaper to replace the cards that fail than it is to try to
    re-solder wires onto burnt IC board circuit traces.

    If you pay by the hour, be sure to ask for a NEW part....all over in 10
    minutes.

    Actually repairing a damaged card - if it is possible at all - would take
    far longer....and cost you more as you may find you need to buy a new
    component anyway....plus labour to try to fix the old one.
     
    steve, Aug 7, 2005
    #8
  9. revirdtaes

    PC Guest

    "revirdtaes" <> wrote in message
    news:QZbJe.863$...
    >
    > Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    > or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    > Seems a bit of a con to me.
    >


    Did any one look at the email addy?
    I smell a troll!
    PeeCee
     
    PC, Aug 7, 2005
    #9
  10. revirdtaes

    Brendan Guest

    On Sun, 7 Aug 2005 11:46:56 +1200, revirdtaes wrote:

    > Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    > or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    > Seems a bit of a con to me.


    Soldering replacement microchips onto a modern computer circuit board is
    usually impossible without equipment costing many tens of thousands of
    dollars, supply contracts costing hundreds of thousands, and engineers that
    would make 100x the salary actually designing rather than repairing.

    Your heater or microwave oven do not come into even the same universe.

    --

    .... Brendan

    #139697 +(4371)- [X]

    <frank> can you help me install GTA3?
    <knightmare> first, shut down all programs you aren't using
    frank has quit IRC. (Quit)
    <knightmare> ...


    Note: All my comments are copyright 7/08/2005 12:59:17 p.m. and are opinion only where not otherwise stated and always "to the best of my recollection". www.computerman.orcon.net.nz.
     
    Brendan, Aug 7, 2005
    #10
  11. revirdtaes

    Rob J Guest

    On Mon, 8 Aug 2005 01:45:51 +1200, Brendan <>
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 7 Aug 2005 11:46:56 +1200, revirdtaes wrote:
    >
    >> Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    >> or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    >> Seems a bit of a con to me.

    >
    >Soldering replacement microchips onto a modern computer circuit board is
    >usually impossible without equipment costing many tens of thousands of
    >dollars, supply contracts costing hundreds of thousands, and engineers that
    >would make 100x the salary actually designing rather than repairing.


    The equipment does not cost tens of thousands of dollars - people
    still repair TVs and other gear that uses the same type of
    componentry.

    It may cost that much to set yourself up to manufacture these boards,
    with automated gear to place and solder the boards - but that is not
    in the same league as repairing them.
     
    Rob J, Aug 7, 2005
    #11
  12. revirdtaes

    revirdtaes Guest

    "PC" <> wrote in message
    news:x9jJe.979$...
    >
    > "revirdtaes" <> wrote in message
    > news:QZbJe.863$...
    >>
    >> Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    >> or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    >> Seems a bit of a con to me.
    >>

    >
    > Did any one look at the email addy?
    > I smell a troll!
    > PeeCee


    No, no. I was just curious.
    Seems to me that computer 'repair experts' are just not worth the money.
    And it's false advertising. All these companies are in the yellowpages
    under Computer Repairs,
    and state such in their ads, but they are really just replacers ?!

    What's to stop anyone setting up as a computer repair man ?
     
    revirdtaes, Aug 7, 2005
    #12
  13. revirdtaes

    PC Guest

    "Rob J" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 8 Aug 2005 01:45:51 +1200, Brendan <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 7 Aug 2005 11:46:56 +1200, revirdtaes wrote:
    >>
    >>> Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    >>> or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    >>> Seems a bit of a con to me.

    >>
    >>Soldering replacement microchips onto a modern computer circuit board is
    >>usually impossible without equipment costing many tens of thousands of
    >>dollars, supply contracts costing hundreds of thousands, and engineers
    >>that
    >>would make 100x the salary actually designing rather than repairing.

    >
    > The equipment does not cost tens of thousands of dollars - people
    > still repair TVs and other gear that uses the same type of
    > componentry.
    >
    > It may cost that much to set yourself up to manufacture these boards,
    > with automated gear to place and solder the boards - but that is not
    > in the same league as repairing them.
    >


    Rob

    The last time I looked at getting a surface mount soldering/rework station
    the price was in the region of $5000 minimum. One has to do a lot of smd
    repairs to amortise that cost to a reasonable amount per job. Then there is
    the variation in particular smd's your replacing on any given job, the
    number of time you actually need it in a day, plus maintenance costs of
    course.
    I reckon I would need $30 per day just to cover the cost over a 5 year
    period in capital and interest on capital.
    Now if I only do one job per week involving an smd that means I have to
    charge a minimum $150 + labour + hardware for that job. Say it takes an hour
    to do and I get the IC from a scrapped board = $215. Would you pay that much
    to repair a board that likely only costs $45 new?

    Cheers
    Paul.
     
    PC, Aug 8, 2005
    #13
  14. revirdtaes

    AD. Guest

    On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 10:49:50 +1200, revirdtaes wrote:

    > No, no. I was just curious.
    > Seems to me that computer 'repair experts' are just not worth the money.
    > And it's false advertising. All these companies are in the yellowpages
    > under Computer Repairs,
    > and state such in their ads, but they are really just replacers ?!


    You have a strange definition of 'repair' and 'replace'.

    If someone replaced your computer you would have a new one, whereas
    someone repairing your computer makes your broken one go again.

    Does a mechanic not repair your car if they end up replacing some parts?

    Maybe if these people touted themselves as repairers of parts rather than
    repairers of computers you might have a point.

    There comes a point where unless you are able to fabricate stuff from
    scratch, you will need to replace some parts. And keeping inventories of
    all the minor parts in cheap components like CDROMs (and for every make
    and model of CDROM) is just silly. The larger components are for the most
    part interchangable items designed with standard interfaces - the parts
    that make up those components aren't.

    --
    Cheers
    Anton
     
    AD., Aug 8, 2005
    #14
  15. revirdtaes

    MarkH Guest

    "revirdtaes" <> wrote in news:hewJe.1088
    $:

    > No, no. I was just curious.
    > Seems to me that computer 'repair experts' are just not worth the money.
    > And it's false advertising. All these companies are in the yellowpages
    > under Computer Repairs,
    > and state such in their ads, but they are really just replacers ?!
    >
    > What's to stop anyone setting up as a computer repair man ?


    There are no real qualifications required to repair computers. All you
    need is some confidence with opening PCs and replacing faulty parts and an
    ability to work out which part is causing the problem.

    In other words - Some skill and experience is enough to be able to fix
    almost any computer problem on the average desktop PCs.

    You do also need to understand that certain chips like RAM or Video RAM and
    rather susceptible to static electricity and you need to earth yourself
    before touching them - Otherwise you will be plagued with intermittent
    faults that can be a right pain to diagnose.

    There will always be people that think that they know enough to do the
    simple job of replacing a component or two inside a PC, but they don't know
    quite enough. I once had to explain to someone why the 2nd HDD wasn't
    working - you need to set the jumper for master or slave, he said that he
    had connected it to the end of the cable and the middle of the cable and it
    made no difference. I also saw a photo e-mailed to the company I worked
    for that showed the CPU heatsink and fan did not fit on the motherboard
    (Slot 1), but we replied to let him know that he had put it on backwards.

    If you seriously want to be a computer repairer you need to be able to
    build and modify your own PC, install Windows yourself and boot from a CD
    to run scandisk. If you already have experience doing things like this for
    yourself and friends then you probably have the basic skill set required.
    Another important skill is virus removal, this is a very common need for
    many users.

    A large proportion of computer users that need a tech to look at their PC
    simply lack the confidence to open the case and touch any of the bits
    inside. Often they would rather pay someone with the experience and
    confidence to replace the RAM without breaking out in a cold sweat.


    --
    Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
    See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 25-June-05)
    "There are 10 types of people, those that
    understand binary and those that don't"
     
    MarkH, Aug 8, 2005
    #15
  16. revirdtaes

    Rob J Guest

    On Mon, 8 Aug 2005 10:49:50 +1200, "revirdtaes"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"PC" <> wrote in message
    >news:x9jJe.979$...
    >>
    >> "revirdtaes" <> wrote in message
    >> news:QZbJe.863$...
    >>>
    >>> Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    >>> or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    >>> Seems a bit of a con to me.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Did any one look at the email addy?
    >> I smell a troll!
    >> PeeCee

    >
    >No, no. I was just curious.
    >Seems to me that computer 'repair experts' are just not worth the money.
    >And it's false advertising. All these companies are in the yellowpages
    >under Computer Repairs,
    >and state such in their ads, but they are really just replacers ?!
    >
    >What's to stop anyone setting up as a computer repair man ?


    First point, you can't repair an iMac or any Mac Classic unless you
    have an electrical certification.

    Secondly, TVs, monitors and the like are still repaired in most cases.
    They also require technical skills.

    Computers are a modular design and as such most of the individual
    modules are cheap enough to be replaced by exchange. Also the internal
    parts of a PC operate on low voltage and thus they are safe to work on
    without needing an electrical certificate, provided the power supply
    casing is not opened.

    I fix PCs for a living, among other things, but I do not do anything
    that requires working on the mains wiring of a PC because I do not
    have the electrical certification. A while ago an old PC with the AT
    style power supply blew up here. Although we had another power supply
    of the same type I declined to replace it because these power supplies
    have mains wiring outside the case that goes to the front panel
    mounted power switch.

    Most computer assembly and repair shops in my understanding turned a
    blind eye to this obvious anomaly in the AT days and did not issue the
    required electrical safety certification sticker with their PCs.
     
    Rob J, Aug 8, 2005
    #16
  17. revirdtaes

    Rob J Guest

    On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 00:12:10 GMT, MarkH <> wrote:

    >"revirdtaes" <> wrote in news:hewJe.1088
    >$:
    >
    >> No, no. I was just curious.
    >> Seems to me that computer 'repair experts' are just not worth the money.
    >> And it's false advertising. All these companies are in the yellowpages
    >> under Computer Repairs,
    >> and state such in their ads, but they are really just replacers ?!
    >>
    >> What's to stop anyone setting up as a computer repair man ?

    >
    >There are no real qualifications required to repair computers. All you
    >need is some confidence with opening PCs and replacing faulty parts and an
    >ability to work out which part is causing the problem.


    Old AT style machines have mains wiring from the power supply to the
    front panel power switch. Any work on this wiring (such as replacing
    the power supply or switch) must be carried out by someone with the
    appropriate electrical certification, and inspected, and any required
    documentation completed.

    However, I never heard of any PC assembler or repair shop doing this,
    even though it is clearly covered under electrical regulations.

    In most cases the mains terminals are covered by plastic or rubber
    sleeves. Whether this meets the definition of enclosure to not require
    a certification after the outer shell of the PC case is removed, is
    open to question.

    >If you seriously want to be a computer repairer you need to be able to
    >build and modify your own PC, install Windows yourself and boot from a CD
    >to run scandisk. If you already have experience doing things like this for
    >yourself and friends then you probably have the basic skill set required.
    >Another important skill is virus removal, this is a very common need for
    >many users.
    >
    >A large proportion of computer users that need a tech to look at their PC
    >simply lack the confidence to open the case and touch any of the bits
    >inside. Often they would rather pay someone with the experience and
    >confidence to replace the RAM without breaking out in a cold sweat.


    I once replaced a CPU fan and heatsink on a PC, the clips are very
    tight to get on and off. In this case I had a tool slip and must have
    nicked a track on the board, as the PC would not start up after the
    work was completed. We got another motherboard at a cheap price as it
    was an old model.

    Jobs like that demand a certain level of skill on the modern boards
    which have very tightly packed components that are easy to damage if
    you don't know what you are doing.
     
    Rob J, Aug 8, 2005
    #17
  18. revirdtaes

    Rob J Guest

    On Mon, 8 Aug 2005 11:10:41 +1200, "PC" <> wrote:

    >
    >"Rob J" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Mon, 8 Aug 2005 01:45:51 +1200, Brendan <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sun, 7 Aug 2005 11:46:56 +1200, revirdtaes wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    >>>> or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    >>>> Seems a bit of a con to me.
    >>>
    >>>Soldering replacement microchips onto a modern computer circuit board is
    >>>usually impossible without equipment costing many tens of thousands of
    >>>dollars, supply contracts costing hundreds of thousands, and engineers
    >>>that
    >>>would make 100x the salary actually designing rather than repairing.

    >>
    >> The equipment does not cost tens of thousands of dollars - people
    >> still repair TVs and other gear that uses the same type of
    >> componentry.
    >>
    >> It may cost that much to set yourself up to manufacture these boards,
    >> with automated gear to place and solder the boards - but that is not
    >> in the same league as repairing them.
    >>

    >
    >Rob
    >
    >The last time I looked at getting a surface mount soldering/rework station
    >the price was in the region of $5000 minimum. One has to do a lot of smd
    >repairs to amortise that cost to a reasonable amount per job. Then there is
    >the variation in particular smd's your replacing on any given job, the
    >number of time you actually need it in a day, plus maintenance costs of
    >course.
    >I reckon I would need $30 per day just to cover the cost over a 5 year
    >period in capital and interest on capital.
    >Now if I only do one job per week involving an smd that means I have to
    >charge a minimum $150 + labour + hardware for that job. Say it takes an hour
    >to do and I get the IC from a scrapped board = $215. Would you pay that much
    >to repair a board that likely only costs $45 new?


    I can't see anyone repairing a PC board, however TV repair involves
    similar techniques although it is declining in economics as the price
    of TVs drops.
     
    Rob J, Aug 8, 2005
    #18
  19. revirdtaes

    Philip Guest

    PC wrote:
    > "Rob J" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>On Mon, 8 Aug 2005 01:45:51 +1200, Brendan <>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>On Sun, 7 Aug 2005 11:46:56 +1200, revirdtaes wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Does any company actually repair computers and printers,
    >>>>or do they just replace the parts and charge you extra ?
    >>>>Seems a bit of a con to me.
    >>>
    >>>Soldering replacement microchips onto a modern computer circuit board is
    >>>usually impossible without equipment costing many tens of thousands of
    >>>dollars, supply contracts costing hundreds of thousands, and engineers
    >>>that
    >>>would make 100x the salary actually designing rather than repairing.

    >>
    >>The equipment does not cost tens of thousands of dollars - people
    >>still repair TVs and other gear that uses the same type of
    >>componentry.
    >>
    >>It may cost that much to set yourself up to manufacture these boards,
    >>with automated gear to place and solder the boards - but that is not
    >>in the same league as repairing them.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Rob
    >
    > The last time I looked at getting a surface mount soldering/rework station
    > the price was in the region of $5000 minimum. One has to do a lot of smd
    > repairs to amortise that cost to a reasonable amount per job. Then there is
    > the variation in particular smd's your replacing on any given job, the
    > number of time you actually need it in a day, plus maintenance costs of
    > course.
    > I reckon I would need $30 per day just to cover the cost over a 5 year
    > period in capital and interest on capital.
    > Now if I only do one job per week involving an smd that means I have to
    > charge a minimum $150 + labour + hardware for that job. Say it takes an hour
    > to do and I get the IC from a scrapped board = $215. Would you pay that much
    > to repair a board that likely only costs $45 new?
    >
    > Cheers
    > Paul.
    >

    And another example - I recently enquired about additional RAM for the
    1999 Dell Dimension that we currently use for storing A/V media for the
    radio station.


    I found out that this is in a proprietary RAMBUS configuration, and
    sells at $250 for 256 MB. Not worth it. The world has moved on, I can
    buy faster and cheaper RAM to put in new computers, and so the old Dell
    will soldier on with its 384 MB until the smoke starts leaking out of
    its chips.

    Computers are a commodity item. You should be able to write them off in
    three years. Five years is a pretty good life-span. More is an added
    benefit until the machine stops doing whatever I want it to do. And
    repairs beyond replacing the lithium battery and replugging wires that
    fell out don't make sense - even if you could be sure that the thing
    would stay repaired...

    Philip
     
    Philip, Aug 8, 2005
    #19
  20. revirdtaes

    MarkH Guest

    Rob J <> wrote in
    news::

    > On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 00:12:10 GMT, MarkH <> wrote:
    >
    >>There are no real qualifications required to repair computers. All
    >>you need is some confidence with opening PCs and replacing faulty
    >>parts and an ability to work out which part is causing the problem.

    >
    > Old AT style machines have mains wiring from the power supply to the
    > front panel power switch. Any work on this wiring (such as replacing
    > the power supply or switch) must be carried out by someone with the
    > appropriate electrical certification, and inspected, and any required
    > documentation completed.
    >
    > However, I never heard of any PC assembler or repair shop doing this,
    > even though it is clearly covered under electrical regulations.


    I have replaced AT PSUs and have also replace AT switches, with no
    certification. I have also seen someone working on an AT computer and
    touch the connectors and get a shock. But I would say that is no longer an
    issue as AT computers are now quite rare and I would always advise
    replacing the computer if it is that old. IIRC the ATX Standard came out
    in the mid-nineties, so it would be about 10 years old now.

    These days with ATX PSUs, as long as you don't open up the PSU itself then
    you are not exposed to 240V.


    --
    Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
    See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 25-June-05)
    "There are 10 types of people, those that
    understand binary and those that don't"
     
    MarkH, Aug 8, 2005
    #20
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