computer projectors for photography

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by J. Clarke, Mar 1, 2007.

  1. J. Clarke

    J. Clarke Guest

    On Wed, 28 Feb 2007 19:56:10 -0800, "Roger N. Clark (change username
    to rnclark)" <> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >I have had quite a few bad (some really bad) experiences
    >with computer projectors displaying images. The problems
    >with image projectors seem to be too high of contrast:
    >one loses the highs, or the lows, or both. Colors
    >aren't that great either. This is through a variety
    >of experiences in multiple meetings at multiple
    >institutions projecting image data (usually spacecraft
    >planetary images), and slide shows of my own photos.
    >Often people would start saying, well, I can see what
    >I'm trying to show on the laptop screen, and then hold
    >up the laptop to try and illustrate their point. We turn
    >out the lights, adjust the brightness and contrast
    >and usually are only able to make very minor improvements.
    >Actually, its been pretty pathetic.
    >
    >So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    >that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    >as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    >Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    >Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    >and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    >price, you can't afford it). ;-)


    Just a suggestion, but there should be an A/V rental place near
    you--call them and tell them what you want to do and ask them if they
    can show you some equipment--if they've got something that works for
    you you're set, if not then you haven't spent anything.

    Also make the rounds of the home theater places--see if you can find a
    Sanyo or Boxlight dealer and try one of their HD projectors.

    My WXGA Sanyo shows pretty much the same thing that I see on the
    laptop display. Wasn't cheap though--it's the third most expensive
    artifact (neglecting inherited jewelry) that I own.

    As for resolution, XGA (1024x768) is commonplace and fairly cheap
    (some of those projectors are almost pocket sized), 1920x1080 can be
    had for under $4000, beyond that you're into the 5 digit range.

    For calibration, Colorvision has a couple of models that are intended
    to work with front projectors. Presumably their competitors have
    equivalents.
    J. Clarke, Mar 1, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Hi,
    I have had quite a few bad (some really bad) experiences
    with computer projectors displaying images. The problems
    with image projectors seem to be too high of contrast:
    one loses the highs, or the lows, or both. Colors
    aren't that great either. This is through a variety
    of experiences in multiple meetings at multiple
    institutions projecting image data (usually spacecraft
    planetary images), and slide shows of my own photos.
    Often people would start saying, well, I can see what
    I'm trying to show on the laptop screen, and then hold
    up the laptop to try and illustrate their point. We turn
    out the lights, adjust the brightness and contrast
    and usually are only able to make very minor improvements.
    Actually, its been pretty pathetic.

    So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    price, you can't afford it). ;-)

    Roger
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Mar 1, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. J. Clarke

    Guest

    This is good to know - I've been wanting a projector for years, but
    have focused on other things lately ... it sounds like they're
    starting to work pretty well for photography? At least the good ones?
    , Mar 1, 2007
    #3
  4. J. Clarke

    Daniel Masse Guest

    "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <> a écrit
    dans le message de news: ...
    > So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    > that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    > as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    > Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    > Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    > and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    > price, you can't afford it). ;-)


    I came exactly to the same conclusions, after watching many low-quality
    digital shows. And, since making slide shows is one of my main uses for
    photography, I am still sticking to film : I don't see any reason to spend a
    fortune to acquire digital equipment, to end up with a result of much lower
    quality than what I get with slides.

    This said, I must also admit that some people seem to get better results
    with digital projectors. But, the way I understand it, the quality of the
    image depends on all the components : graphic card on the computer, video
    projector, and projection screen.

    There is a large worldwide community of users of Picture To Exe (PTE), a
    software with which one can obtain results very similar to those of slide
    shows. Of course, projectors are extremely important to those people, and
    the subject is frequently discussed in their forums.

    I would suggest you to look in the forums dedicated to PTE. A list is here :
    http://www.guru.to.it/en/members.htm
    Daniel Masse, Mar 1, 2007
    #4
  5. J. Clarke

    Matt Ion Guest

    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark) wrote:
    > Hi,
    > I have had quite a few bad (some really bad) experiences
    > with computer projectors displaying images. The problems
    > with image projectors seem to be too high of contrast:
    > one loses the highs, or the lows, or both. Colors
    > aren't that great either. This is through a variety
    > of experiences in multiple meetings at multiple
    > institutions projecting image data (usually spacecraft
    > planetary images), and slide shows of my own photos.
    > Often people would start saying, well, I can see what
    > I'm trying to show on the laptop screen, and then hold
    > up the laptop to try and illustrate their point. We turn
    > out the lights, adjust the brightness and contrast
    > and usually are only able to make very minor improvements.
    > Actually, its been pretty pathetic.
    >
    > So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    > that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    > as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    > Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    > Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    > and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    > price, you can't afford it). ;-)


    My first question is, how are you sending the images to the projector? If
    you're using the camera's composite-video output to the projector's video input,
    you're going to lose a lot of quality. Almost all newer LCD projectors have a
    VGA input (or even DVI) and feeding that from a computer/laptop should give you
    an image comparable to most LCD panels.
    Matt Ion, Mar 1, 2007
    #5
  6. J. Clarke

    J. Clarke Guest

    On 28 Feb 2007 20:46:36 -0800, wrote:

    >This is good to know - I've been wanting a projector for years, but
    >have focused on other things lately ... it sounds like they're
    >starting to work pretty well for photography? At least the good ones?


    The decent ones work well enough for _my_ purposes but that doesn't
    mean that they'll work for yours. Only way to know for sure is to
    test.
    J. Clarke, Mar 1, 2007
    #6
  7. J. Clarke

    Guest

    On Mar 1, 10:56 am, "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)"
    <> wrote:
    > Hi,
    > I have had quite a few bad (some really bad) experiences
    > with computer projectors displaying images. The problems
    > with image projectors seem to be too high of contrast:
    > one loses the highs, or the lows, or both. Colors
    > aren't that great either. This is through a variety
    > of experiences in multiple meetings at multiple
    > institutions projecting image data (usually spacecraft
    > planetary images), and slide shows of my own photos.
    > Often people would start saying, well, I can see what
    > I'm trying to show on the laptop screen, and then hold
    > up the laptop to try and illustrate their point. We turn
    > out the lights, adjust the brightness and contrast
    > and usually are only able to make very minor improvements.
    > Actually, its been pretty pathetic.
    >
    > So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    > that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    > as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    > Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    > Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    > and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    > price, you can't afford it). ;-)
    >
    > Roger
    , Mar 1, 2007
    #7
  8. J. Clarke

    Guest

    On Mar 1, 10:49 am, J. Clarke <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 28 Feb 2007 19:56:10 -0800, "Roger N. Clark (change username
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > to rnclark)" <> wrote:
    > >Hi,
    > >I have had quite a few bad (some really bad) experiences
    > >with computer projectors displaying images. The problems
    > >with image projectors seem to be too high of contrast:
    > >one loses the highs, or the lows, or both. Colors
    > >aren't that great either. This is through a variety
    > >of experiences in multiple meetings at multiple
    > >institutions projecting image data (usually spacecraft
    > >planetary images), and slide shows of my own photos.
    > >Often people would start saying, well, I can see what
    > >I'm trying to show on the laptop screen, and then hold
    > >up the laptop to try and illustrate their point. We turn
    > >out the lights, adjust the brightness and contrast
    > >and usually are only able to make very minor improvements.
    > >Actually, its been pretty pathetic.

    >
    > >So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    > >that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    > >as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    > >Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    > >Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    > >and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    > >price, you can't afford it). ;-)

    >
    > Just a suggestion, but there should be an A/V rental place near
    > you--call them and tell them what you want to do and ask them if they
    > can show you some equipment--if they've got something that works for
    > you you're set, if not then you haven't spent anything.
    >
    > Also make the rounds of the home theater places--see if you can find a
    > Sanyo or Boxlight dealer and try one of their HD projectors.
    >
    > My WXGA Sanyo shows pretty much the same thing that I see on the
    > laptop display. Wasn't cheap though--it's the third most expensive
    > artifact (neglecting inherited jewelry) that I own.
    >
    > As for resolution, XGA (1024x768) is commonplace and fairly cheap
    > (some of those projectors are almost pocket sized), 1920x1080 can be
    > had for under $4000, beyond that you're into the 5 digit range.
    >
    > For calibration, Colorvision has a couple of models that are intended
    > to work with front projectors. Presumably their competitors have
    > equivalents.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -
    , Mar 1, 2007
    #8
  9. J. Clarke

    Guest

    On Mar 1, 10:49 am, J. Clarke <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 28 Feb 2007 19:56:10 -0800, "Roger N. Clark (change username
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > to rnclark)" <> wrote:
    > >Hi,
    > >I have had quite a few bad (some really bad) experiences
    > >with computer projectors displaying images. The problems
    > >with image projectors seem to be too high of contrast:
    > >one loses the highs, or the lows, or both. Colors
    > >aren't that great either. This is through a variety
    > >of experiences in multiple meetings at multiple
    > >institutions projecting image data (usually spacecraft
    > >planetary images), and slide shows of my own photos.
    > >Often people would start saying, well, I can see what
    > >I'm trying to show on the laptop screen, and then hold
    > >up the laptop to try and illustrate their point. We turn
    > >out the lights, adjust the brightness and contrast
    > >and usually are only able to make very minor improvements.
    > >Actually, its been pretty pathetic.

    >
    > >So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    > >that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    > >as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    > >Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    > >Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    > >and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    > >price, you can't afford it). ;-)

    >
    > Just a suggestion, but there should be an A/V rental place near
    > you--call them and tell them what you want to do and ask them if they
    > can show you some equipment--if they've got something that works for
    > you you're set, if not then you haven't spent anything.
    >
    > Also make the rounds of the home theater places--see if you can find a
    > Sanyo or Boxlight dealer and try one of their HD projectors.
    >
    > My WXGA Sanyo shows pretty much the same thing that I see on the
    > laptop display. Wasn't cheap though--it's the third most expensive
    > artifact (neglecting inherited jewelry) that I own.
    >
    > As for resolution, XGA (1024x768) is commonplace and fairly cheap
    > (some of those projectors are almost pocket sized), 1920x1080 can be
    > had for under $4000, beyond that you're into the 5 digit range.
    >
    > For calibration, Colorvision has a couple of models that are intended
    > to work with front projectors. Presumably their competitors have
    > equivalents.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -
    , Mar 1, 2007
    #9
  10. J. Clarke

    Guest

    On Mar 1, 2:23 pm, "Daniel Masse"
    <> wrote:
    > "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <> a écrit
    > dans le message denews: 45E64EDA.90__BEGIN_MASK_n#9g02mG7!__...__END_MASK_i?a63jfAD$...
    >
    > > So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    > > that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    > > as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    > > Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    > > Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    > > and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    > > price, you can't afford it). ;-)

    >
    > I came exactly to the same conclusions, after watching many low-quality
    > digital shows. And, since making slide shows is one of my main uses for
    > photography, I am still sticking to film : I don't see any reason to spend a
    > fortune to acquire digital equipment, to end up with a result of much lower
    > quality than what I get with slides.
    >
    > This said, I must also admit that some people seem to get better results
    > with digital projectors. But, the way I understand it, the quality of the
    > image depends on all the components : graphic card on the computer, video
    > projector, and projection screen.
    >
    > There is a large worldwide community of users of Picture To Exe (PTE), a
    > software with which one can obtain results very similar to those of slide
    > shows. Of course, projectors are extremely important to those people, and
    > the subject is frequently discussed in their forums.
    >
    > I would suggest you to look in the forums dedicated to PTE. A list is here :http://www.guru.to.it/en/members.htm
    , Mar 1, 2007
    #10
  11. J. Clarke

    J. Clarke Guest

    On 1 Mar 2007 02:37:35 -0800, wrote:

    <reposting of earlier post snipped>

    Do you have something to say or are you just fond of reposting others'
    posts?
    J. Clarke, Mar 1, 2007
    #11
  12. Matt Ion wrote:
    > Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark) wrote:
    >> So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    >> that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    >> as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    >> Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    >> Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    >> and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    >> price, you can't afford it). ;-)

    >
    > My first question is, how are you sending the images to the projector?
    > If you're using the camera's composite-video output to the projector's
    > video input, you're going to lose a lot of quality. Almost all newer
    > LCD projectors have a VGA input (or even DVI) and feeding that from a
    > computer/laptop should give you an image comparable to most LCD panels.


    Matt,
    All laptops I have, have used, seen other people use, have been done with
    the monitor connection on the laptop, the same connector that one would use
    to plug in an external LCD or CRT. The signal looks great on a calibrated
    external monitor, but not good on most projectors. (Most LCD monitors
    come poorly calibrated for photos--different thread we've already had.)

    Roger
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Mar 1, 2007
    #12
  13. J. Clarke wrote:
    > On Wed, 28 Feb 2007 19:56:10 -0800, "Roger N. Clark (change username
    > to rnclark)" <> wrote:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >> I have had quite a few bad (some really bad) experiences
    >> with computer projectors displaying images. The problems
    >> with image projectors seem to be too high of contrast:
    >> one loses the highs, or the lows, or both. Colors
    >> aren't that great either. This is through a variety
    >> of experiences in multiple meetings at multiple
    >> institutions projecting image data (usually spacecraft
    >> planetary images), and slide shows of my own photos.
    >> Often people would start saying, well, I can see what
    >> I'm trying to show on the laptop screen, and then hold
    >> up the laptop to try and illustrate their point. We turn
    >> out the lights, adjust the brightness and contrast
    >> and usually are only able to make very minor improvements.
    >> Actually, its been pretty pathetic.
    >>
    >> So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    >> that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    >> as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    >> Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    >> Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    >> and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    >> price, you can't afford it). ;-)

    >
    > Just a suggestion, but there should be an A/V rental place near
    > you--call them and tell them what you want to do and ask them if they
    > can show you some equipment--if they've got something that works for
    > you you're set, if not then you haven't spent anything.
    >
    > Also make the rounds of the home theater places--see if you can find a
    > Sanyo or Boxlight dealer and try one of their HD projectors.
    >
    > My WXGA Sanyo shows pretty much the same thing that I see on the
    > laptop display. Wasn't cheap though--it's the third most expensive
    > artifact (neglecting inherited jewelry) that I own.
    >
    > As for resolution, XGA (1024x768) is commonplace and fairly cheap
    > (some of those projectors are almost pocket sized), 1920x1080 can be
    > had for under $4000, beyond that you're into the 5 digit range.
    >
    > For calibration, Colorvision has a couple of models that are intended
    > to work with front projectors. Presumably their competitors have
    > equivalents.


    J.,
    Good suggestions, Thanks.
    I was hoping someone had good experience with a particular
    model so I could be sure to check it out.

    Roger
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Mar 1, 2007
    #13
  14. J. Clarke

    Daniel Masse Guest

    "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <> a écrit
    dans le message de news: ...

    > So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    > that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    > as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    > Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    > Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    > and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    > price, you can't afford it). ;-)


    Projectors recently (January 2007) recommended by members of the French
    Diapovision group : BenQ 6210, BenQ MP721 (newer), Optoma EP 739, Toshiba
    T45, Optoma DX 733 DLP, l'Optoma EP 709 (less powerful), DELL 2300MP(beware
    of repairs)
    Daniel Masse, Mar 1, 2007
    #14
  15. J. Clarke

    J. Clarke Guest

    On Thu, 01 Mar 2007 06:15:09 -0700, "Roger N. Clark (change username
    to rnclark)" <> wrote:

    >J. Clarke wrote:
    >> On Wed, 28 Feb 2007 19:56:10 -0800, "Roger N. Clark (change username
    >> to rnclark)" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Hi,
    >>> I have had quite a few bad (some really bad) experiences
    >>> with computer projectors displaying images. The problems
    >>> with image projectors seem to be too high of contrast:
    >>> one loses the highs, or the lows, or both. Colors
    >>> aren't that great either. This is through a variety
    >>> of experiences in multiple meetings at multiple
    >>> institutions projecting image data (usually spacecraft
    >>> planetary images), and slide shows of my own photos.
    >>> Often people would start saying, well, I can see what
    >>> I'm trying to show on the laptop screen, and then hold
    >>> up the laptop to try and illustrate their point. We turn
    >>> out the lights, adjust the brightness and contrast
    >>> and usually are only able to make very minor improvements.
    >>> Actually, its been pretty pathetic.
    >>>
    >>> So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    >>> that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    >>> as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    >>> Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    >>> Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    >>> and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    >>> price, you can't afford it). ;-)

    >>
    >> Just a suggestion, but there should be an A/V rental place near
    >> you--call them and tell them what you want to do and ask them if they
    >> can show you some equipment--if they've got something that works for
    >> you you're set, if not then you haven't spent anything.
    >>
    >> Also make the rounds of the home theater places--see if you can find a
    >> Sanyo or Boxlight dealer and try one of their HD projectors.
    >>
    >> My WXGA Sanyo shows pretty much the same thing that I see on the
    >> laptop display. Wasn't cheap though--it's the third most expensive
    >> artifact (neglecting inherited jewelry) that I own.
    >>
    >> As for resolution, XGA (1024x768) is commonplace and fairly cheap
    >> (some of those projectors are almost pocket sized), 1920x1080 can be
    >> had for under $4000, beyond that you're into the 5 digit range.
    >>
    >> For calibration, Colorvision has a couple of models that are intended
    >> to work with front projectors. Presumably their competitors have
    >> equivalents.

    >
    >J.,
    >Good suggestions, Thanks.
    >I was hoping someone had good experience with a particular
    >model so I could be sure to check it out.


    I've been using a Boxlight Cinema 20HD (aka Sanyo PLV-70--the Boxlight
    was a little cheaper and the only difference is that it has a white
    case and a different label) but there's no point in my recommending it
    because it's been out of production for a while. The current
    equivalent seems to be the PLV-75, or there's a brighter version
    called the PLV-80. These aren't pocket sized--they weigh around 20
    pounds. The 80 is actually a hair lighter, but also has a louder fan.

    The PLV-70 does for my purposes, which are classroom presentations in
    which photos are used for purposes of illustration and not presented
    as fine art, and as a large-screen TV display, but that doesn't mean
    that it will do for yours. It replaced an Epson, the model number of
    which escapes me, on which the LCDs finally became so misaligned that
    it was useless, and it had no adjustment--the only fix was to replace
    the whole optical assembly for more than the price of a new projector.
    The Sanyo is suppoed to be adjustable but I haven't had a problem with
    it so far so can't say from experience.

    These are all WXGA (1366x768). Sanyo also has some 1920x1080 models
    but they start at $40K and weigh over 80 pounds.

    Note that you can get the Sanyos from B&H, as well as a number of
    other brands.

    Be aware that the bulbs for any decent projector cost $200-500 and
    last 1000-2000 operating hours depending on model and usage--and be
    _very_ careful where you buy bulbs.

    >Roger
    J. Clarke, Mar 1, 2007
    #15
  16. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark) wrote:

    > So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    > that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    > as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    > Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    > Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    > and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    > price, you can't afford it). ;-)


    Try this Roger:

    http://i.b5z.net/i/u/545218/f/pdffiles/RealisBrochure.pdf

    Gary Eickmeier
    Gary Eickmeier, Mar 2, 2007
    #16
  17. J. Clarke

    JohnR66 Guest

    "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > Hi,
    > I have had quite a few bad (some really bad) experiences
    > with computer projectors displaying images. The problems
    > with image projectors seem to be too high of contrast:
    > one loses the highs, or the lows, or both. Colors
    > aren't that great either. This is through a variety
    > of experiences in multiple meetings at multiple
    > institutions projecting image data (usually spacecraft
    > planetary images), and slide shows of my own photos.
    > Often people would start saying, well, I can see what
    > I'm trying to show on the laptop screen, and then hold
    > up the laptop to try and illustrate their point. We turn
    > out the lights, adjust the brightness and contrast
    > and usually are only able to make very minor improvements.
    > Actually, its been pretty pathetic.
    >
    > So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    > that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    > as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    > Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    > Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    > and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    > price, you can't afford it). ;-)
    >
    > Roger


    I know what you mean. We have a sharp model that has a photo mode that seems
    to help. Have you tried adjusting the curves to better match projection (I
    assume you adjusted brightness and contrast only on the projector)?
    John
    JohnR66, Mar 2, 2007
    #17
  18. J. Clarke

    JC Dill Guest

    On Wed, 28 Feb 2007 19:56:10 -0800, "Roger N. Clark (change username
    to rnclark)" <> wrote:

    >So the question is, can you recommend some good projectors
    >that work well with photographs? Is there such a thing
    >as a calibrated projector as we do with CRT and LCD monitors?
    >Then it seems that projectors are pretty low resolution.
    >Are there good photo projectors with better resolution
    >and at a reasonable price (yeah, I know, if you have to ask
    >price, you can't afford it). ;-)


    Wednesday night I was in a lighting seminar at Keeble & Shuchat in
    Palo Alto. The photographer was using a wireless adapter on his
    camera that sent the photos directly to his laptop, and the laptop was
    hooked up to a projector. We could see the results from each lighting
    setup within seconds after he took the shot.

    The projected images were pretty good - not *quite* as good as on the
    laptop (I was sitting where I could see both the laptop and the
    projected image) but a whole lot better than the standard projector.
    When there were bright spots on the model's face the projected image
    showed more glare than the laptop image - on the laptop you could see
    that the glare was not blowing out the highlights and that this could
    be fixed in photoshop if you didn't want to fix it with lighting
    changes and/or powder on the model's face during the shoot. The
    projected image was also a tad more pink/red than the laptop image.
    The laptop was color calibrated, I believe the projected image was
    using the laptop output and was not separately calibrated from the
    laptop display.

    I missed the first 30 minutes of the class so I didn't get the details
    of the setup. I *believe* the projector was provided by K&S. You
    might want to call and ask them.

    <http://www.kspphoto.com/activepages/main.html>

    Also note that they have two Canon projectors listed in their rental
    equipment:

    <http://www.kspphoto.com/pdf_files/rental/rental_brochure.pdf>

    jc

    --

    "The nice thing about a mare is you get to ride a lot
    of different horses without having to own that many."
    ~ Eileen Morgan of The Mare's Nest, PA
    JC Dill, Mar 2, 2007
    #18
  19. J. Clarke

    Father Kodak Guest

    On Wed, 28 Feb 2007 22:49:16 -0500, J. Clarke <>
    wrote:


    >My WXGA Sanyo shows pretty much the same thing that I see on the
    >laptop display. Wasn't cheap though--it's the third most expensive
    >artifact (neglecting inherited jewelry) that I own.
    >
    >As for resolution, XGA (1024x768) is commonplace and fairly cheap
    >(some of those projectors are almost pocket sized), 1920x1080 can be
    >had for under $4000, beyond that you're into the 5 digit range.
    >


    Let's say that the only place where you want to use your projector is
    at home. Why not just put that money into a nice HD flat panel TV
    with 1080p resolution? I am not at a place right now where I can
    check HD TV specs, but I seem to recall that the spec was somewhere
    around 1920 x 1080p. In fact, I would have to wonder if the 1080p TVs
    and 1920 x 1080 projectors share some internal electronics.

    Pere Kodak
    Father Kodak, Mar 5, 2007
    #19
  20. J. Clarke

    J. Clarke Guest

    Father Kodak wrote:
    > On Wed, 28 Feb 2007 22:49:16 -0500, J. Clarke <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >> My WXGA Sanyo shows pretty much the same thing that I see on the
    >> laptop display. Wasn't cheap though--it's the third most expensive
    >> artifact (neglecting inherited jewelry) that I own.
    >>
    >> As for resolution, XGA (1024x768) is commonplace and fairly cheap
    >> (some of those projectors are almost pocket sized), 1920x1080 can be
    >> had for under $4000, beyond that you're into the 5 digit range.
    >>

    >
    > Let's say that the only place where you want to use your projector is
    > at home. Why not just put that money into a nice HD flat panel TV
    > with 1080p resolution? I am not at a place right now where I can
    > check HD TV specs, but I seem to recall that the spec was somewhere
    > around 1920 x 1080p. In fact, I would have to wonder if the 1080p TVs
    > and 1920 x 1080 projectors share some internal electronics.


    Well, for $4K you can get a flat panel HDTV that gives you maybe 52
    inches. The same money in a projector fills a wall, or if you want to
    go outside at night the whole side of the house. But the TV doesn't
    need a new bulb every 6 months to 2 years.

    As for sharing electronics, likely there are some chips in common but
    it's unlikely that there is any commonality at the board level.

    --
    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
    J. Clarke, Mar 5, 2007
    #20
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