Comparison of OEM and Retail Versions of software?

Discussion in 'Microsoft Certification' started by Michael Patten, Jan 11, 2005.

  1. Hi,

    I've been wondering about this since i started to see OEM versions of
    windows XP popping up on Ebay.

    What, if any, are the functional differences of an OEM version than that of
    the retail?
    Are these differences the same for products such as Office XP OEM?

    I am looking at upgrading a number of computers, and would be buying a new
    Mobo & CPU, so i believe that satisfies the criteria for the OEM software -
    but would like to know if anyone has encountered any problems with the use
    of this
    software in comparison to the retail version or if there are functional
    differences.

    --
    Regards,
    Michael Patten

    Remember - There are 2 types of users;
    Those that have lost data, and those who are about to.
    -------------------------------------------------------

    "Louis Friend" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    > I buy/sell OEM Operating systems legally by including pc hardware with
    > the sale. I asked an MS sales rep what qualified as I was including
    > either a mouse or keyboard (I couldn't believe how ebay dealers
    > offered a cheapo CD ROM audio cable). He said as long as I felt
    > comfortable that it went in a computer then it was ok.
    >
    > It becomes "married" to whatever you install the machine on. So if
    > someone steals your laptop but not your CD under the terms of the
    > license you can't install it again on another computer (obviously
    > you'd include that software cost in your insurance claim). If you
    > tried to install it, Windows XP has that policing mechanism "WPA" to
    > impede you or keep you honest depending on your point of view. ;)
    >
    > BC
    Michael Patten, Jan 11, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Michael Patten

    Mike Hall Guest

    OEM OS..

    1.. has no direct support from Microsoft.. the vendor is responsible
    2.. can't 'upgrade' from one level to another
    3.. is tied to the machine on which it is installed.. not transferable

    Retail OS

    1.. has full support form Microsoft
    2.. can upgrade from one level to another
    3.. is transferable from one machine to another as long as it is only
    installed on one machine at any one time..

    There is no difference in functionality

    I understand that Office versions follow the same pattern essentially..

    I have no doubt that somebody will fill in any gaps that I may have left

    Whichever route you take, purchase from a reputable dealer..

    --
    Mike Hall
    MVP - Windows Shell/user



    "Michael Patten" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I've been wondering about this since i started to see OEM versions of
    > windows XP popping up on Ebay.
    >
    > What, if any, are the functional differences of an OEM version than that
    > of
    > the retail?
    > Are these differences the same for products such as Office XP OEM?
    >
    > I am looking at upgrading a number of computers, and would be buying a new
    > Mobo & CPU, so i believe that satisfies the criteria for the OEM
    > software -
    > but would like to know if anyone has encountered any problems with the use
    > of this
    > software in comparison to the retail version or if there are functional
    > differences.
    >
    > --
    > Regards,
    > Michael Patten
    >
    > Remember - There are 2 types of users;
    > Those that have lost data, and those who are about to.
    > -------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > "Louis Friend" <> wrote in message
    > news:eek:...
    >> I buy/sell OEM Operating systems legally by including pc hardware with
    >> the sale. I asked an MS sales rep what qualified as I was including
    >> either a mouse or keyboard (I couldn't believe how ebay dealers
    >> offered a cheapo CD ROM audio cable). He said as long as I felt
    >> comfortable that it went in a computer then it was ok.
    >>
    >> It becomes "married" to whatever you install the machine on. So if
    >> someone steals your laptop but not your CD under the terms of the
    >> license you can't install it again on another computer (obviously
    >> you'd include that software cost in your insurance claim). If you
    >> tried to install it, Windows XP has that policing mechanism "WPA" to
    >> impede you or keep you honest depending on your point of view. ;)
    >>
    >> BC

    >
    >
    Mike Hall, Jan 11, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Michael Patten wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I've been wondering about this since i started to see OEM versions of
    > windows XP popping up on Ebay.
    >
    > What, if any, are the functional differences of an OEM version than
    > that of the retail?
    > Are these differences the same for products such as Office XP OEM?
    >
    > I am looking at upgrading a number of computers, and would be buying
    > a new Mobo & CPU, so i believe that satisfies the criteria for the
    > OEM software - but would like to know if anyone has encountered any
    > problems with the use of this
    > software in comparison to the retail version or if there are
    > functional differences.
    >
    >
    > "Louis Friend" <> wrote in message
    > news:eek:...
    >> I buy/sell OEM Operating systems legally by including pc hardware
    >> with the sale. I asked an MS sales rep what qualified as I was
    >> including either a mouse or keyboard (I couldn't believe how ebay
    >> dealers offered a cheapo CD ROM audio cable). He said as long as I
    >> felt comfortable that it went in a computer then it was ok.
    >>
    >> It becomes "married" to whatever you install the machine on. So if
    >> someone steals your laptop but not your CD under the terms of the
    >> license you can't install it again on another computer (obviously
    >> you'd include that software cost in your insurance claim). If you
    >> tried to install it, Windows XP has that policing mechanism "WPA" to
    >> impede you or keep you honest depending on your point of view. ;)
    >>
    >> BC


    http://michaelstevenstech.com/xpfaq.html#17
    --
    Michael Stevens MS-MVP XP

    http://michaelstevenstech.com
    For a better newsgroup experience. Setup a newsreader.
    http://michaelstevenstech.com/outlookexpressnewreader.htm
    Michael Stevens, Jan 11, 2005
    #3
  4. Michael Patten

    a nonymous Guest

    "Mike Hall" <> wrote:
    | OEM OS..
    |
    | 1.. has no direct support from Microsoft.. the vendor is responsible
    | 2.. can't 'upgrade' from one level to another
    | 3.. is tied to the machine on which it is installed.. not transferable
    |
    | Retail OS
    |
    | 1.. has full support form Microsoft
    | 2.. can upgrade from one level to another
    | 3.. is transferable from one machine to another as long as it is only
    | installed on one machine at any one time..
    |
    | There is no difference in functionality
    |
    | I understand that Office versions follow the same pattern essentially..
    |
    | I have no doubt that somebody will fill in any gaps that I may have left
    |
    | Whichever route you take, purchase from a reputable dealer..
    |
    | --
    | Mike Hall
    | MVP - Windows Shell/user


    OEM OS..

    4.. No Repair/Instal facility - only return to "as supplied by factory" state
    5.. No access to Recovery Console
    6.. No secret goodies on the CD
    a nonymous, Jan 11, 2005
    #4
  5. Michael Patten wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I've been wondering about this since i started to see OEM versions of
    > windows XP popping up on Ebay.
    >



    Be very, very careful buying *any* software on eBay, as eBay makes
    absolutely no prior effort to ensure that such sales are legitimate;
    they react only after someone files a complaint.


    > What, if any, are the functional differences of an OEM version than that of
    > the retail?
    > Are these differences the same for products such as Office XP OEM?
    >
    >



    There are some very important reasons that an OEM license costs so much
    less than a retail license. OEM licenses are very limited:

    1) OEM versions must be sold with a piece of non-peripheral
    hardware (normally a motherboard or hard drive, if not an entire PC,
    although Microsoft has greatly relaxed the hardware criteria for WinXP)
    and are _permanently_ bound to the first PC on which they are installed.
    An OEM license, once installed, is not legally transferable to another
    computer under any circumstances. This is the main reason some people
    avoid OEM versions; if the PC dies or is otherwise disposed of (even
    stolen), you cannot re-use your OEM license on a new PC. The only
    legitimate way to transfer the ownership of an OEM license is to
    transfer ownership of the entire PC.

    2) Microsoft provides no free support for OEM versions. If you
    have any problems that require outside assistance, your only recourse is
    to contact the manufacturer/builder of the PC or the vendor of the OEM
    license. This would include such issues as lost a Product Key or
    replacing damaged installation media. (Microsoft does make allowances
    for those instances when you can prove that the OEM has gone out of
    business.) This doesn't mean that you can't download patches and
    service packs from Microsoft -- just no free telephone or email support
    for problems with the OS.

    3) An OEM CD cannot be used to perform an upgrade of an earlier
    OS, as it was designed to be installed _only_ upon an empty hard drive.
    It can still be used to perform a repair installation (a.k.a. an
    in-place upgrade) of an existing WinXP installation.

    4) If the OEM CD was designed by a specific manufacturer, such as
    eMachines, Sony, Dell, Gateway, etc., it will most likely only install
    on the same brand of PC, as an additional anti-piracy feature. Further,
    such CDs are severely customized to contain only the minimum of device
    drivers, and a lot of extra nonsense, that the manufacturer feels
    necessary for the specific model of PC for which the CD was designed.
    (To be honest, such CDs should _not_ be available on the open market;
    but, if you're shopping someplace on-line like eBay, swap meets, or
    computer fairs, there's often no telling what you're buying until it's
    too late.) The "generic" OEM CDs, such as are manufactured by Microsoft
    and sold to small systems builders, don't have this particular problem,
    though, and are pretty much the same as their retail counterparts, apart
    from the licensing, support, and upgrading restrictions.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
    Bruce Chambers, Jan 12, 2005
    #5
  6. Your description is of the customized OEM install which many manufacturer's
    supply. However, the retail OEM version is identical in every way to the
    standard retail version in terms of functionality and includes the recovery
    console and the repair install options.

    --
    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/

    "a nonymous" <> wrote in message
    news:ORVvhHC%...
    >
    > "Mike Hall" <> wrote:
    > | OEM OS..
    > |
    > | 1.. has no direct support from Microsoft.. the vendor is responsible
    > | 2.. can't 'upgrade' from one level to another
    > | 3.. is tied to the machine on which it is installed.. not transferable
    > |
    > | Retail OS
    > |
    > | 1.. has full support form Microsoft
    > | 2.. can upgrade from one level to another
    > | 3.. is transferable from one machine to another as long as it is only
    > | installed on one machine at any one time..
    > |
    > | There is no difference in functionality
    > |
    > | I understand that Office versions follow the same pattern essentially..
    > |
    > | I have no doubt that somebody will fill in any gaps that I may have left
    > |
    > | Whichever route you take, purchase from a reputable dealer..
    > |
    > | --
    > | Mike Hall
    > | MVP - Windows Shell/user
    >
    >
    > OEM OS..
    >
    > 4.. No Repair/Instal facility - only return to "as supplied by factory"
    > state
    > 5.. No access to Recovery Console
    > 6.. No secret goodies on the CD
    >
    >
    Michael Solomon \(MS-MVP\), Jan 12, 2005
    #6
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. OrmesbyJohn

    Oem v Retail - What's the difference?

    OrmesbyJohn, Feb 17, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    5,914
    Mellowed
    Feb 18, 2004
  2. Not Known

    OEM and Retail

    Not Known, Sep 27, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    509
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=
    Sep 27, 2004
  3. Bud Light

    OEM vs Retail version of Windows XP???

    Bud Light, Jan 6, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    10,587
    Bud Light
    Jan 8, 2005
  4. frank

    XP oem Vs retail

    frank, Aug 25, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    30
    Views:
    9,380
    Slack
    Aug 27, 2005
  5. Daniel

    Windows XP software question (OEM vs Retail)

    Daniel, Jun 25, 2005, in forum: Computer Information
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    361
    Daniel
    Jun 25, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page