Compaq Pesario c500 laptop . extending the power button

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by me, Feb 14, 2010.

  1. me

    me Guest

    I know the answer to this as far as desktops go, but not with laptops. I
    have a desktop pc running in an arcade cabinet, and have the power button
    re-routed to an arcade button, connected to the pins on the motherboard to
    turn it on and off, works great. My question is, can i do this with a
    laptop, or is it likely that the on-off switch is directly under the button,
    and that the button presses the switch directly, rather than connected via a
    wire like on a tower pc? If that is the case,i might be able to desolder the
    switch and replace it with wires to an external switch.
    me, Feb 14, 2010
    #1
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  2. me

    Mike Easter Guest

    me wrote:
    > I
    > have a desktop pc running in an arcade cabinet,


    > can i do
    > this with a laptop,


    I don't understand why you would want to do that with a LT; that is, I
    don't understand, can't see/imagine, the 'target' result/purpose in this
    scenario.


    --
    Mike Easter
    Mike Easter, Feb 14, 2010
    #2
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  3. me

    PeeCee Guest

    "me" <> wrote in message
    news:4b7797e7$0$15758$...
    > I know the answer to this as far as desktops go, but not with laptops. I
    > have a desktop pc running in an arcade cabinet, and have the power button
    > re-routed to an arcade button, connected to the pins on the motherboard to
    > turn it on and off, works great. My question is, can i do this with a
    > laptop, or is it likely that the on-off switch is directly under the
    > button, and that the button presses the switch directly, rather than
    > connected via a wire like on a tower pc? If that is the case,i might be
    > able to desolder the switch and replace it with wires to an external
    > switch.


    Most modern Laptops have a PCB style momentary switch like this
    :http://www.jaycar.co.nz/productView.asp?ID=SP0609 soldered to a circuit
    board.
    The on button usually presses directly on this.
    As they are a normally open there is no reason you can't solder a pair of
    wires on the back side of the circuit board and run the leads out to a
    switch mounted in a more convenient location.
    Because of the high impedance nature of Laptop circuitry you will probably
    have to filter the lead to avoid phantom triggering.

    Best
    Paul.
    PeeCee, Feb 14, 2010
    #3
  4. me

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2010-02-14, me <> wrote:
    > I know the answer to this as far as desktops go, but not with laptops. I
    > have a desktop pc running in an arcade cabinet, and have the power button
    > re-routed to an arcade button, connected to the pins on the motherboard to
    > turn it on and off, works great. My question is, can i do this with a
    > laptop, or is it likely that the on-off switch is directly under the button,
    > and that the button presses the switch directly, rather than connected via a
    > wire like on a tower pc? If that is the case,i might be able to desolder the
    > switch and replace it with wires to an external switch.


    Why put a computer casing inside some other casing? Wouldn't it be easier
    to put a bare motherboard etc directly into whatever container is going to
    be the outside? That should make for easier maintenence and better
    cooling.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, Feb 14, 2010
    #4
  5. me

    John Holmes Guest

    Mike Easter "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:

    > me wrote:
    >> I
    >> have a desktop pc running in an arcade cabinet,

    >
    >> can i do
    >> this with a laptop,

    >
    > I don't understand why you would want to do that with a LT; that is, I
    > don't understand, can't see/imagine, the 'target' result/purpose in
    > this scenario.
    >
    >


    Who fucking cares what you do or don't understand? The OP must have some
    reason why he wants to accomplish this and that's not of your fucking
    business, Mike.

    --
    <snip>
    John Holmes, Feb 14, 2010
    #5
  6. me

    me Guest

    "Whiskers" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 2010-02-14, me <> wrote:
    >> I know the answer to this as far as desktops go, but not with laptops. I
    >> have a desktop pc running in an arcade cabinet, and have the power button
    >> re-routed to an arcade button, connected to the pins on the motherboard
    >> to
    >> turn it on and off, works great. My question is, can i do this with a
    >> laptop, or is it likely that the on-off switch is directly under the
    >> button,
    >> and that the button presses the switch directly, rather than connected
    >> via a
    >> wire like on a tower pc? If that is the case,i might be able to desolder
    >> the
    >> switch and replace it with wires to an external switch.

    >
    > Why put a computer casing inside some other casing? Wouldn't it be easier
    > to put a bare motherboard etc directly into whatever container is going to
    > be the outside? That should make for easier maintenence and better
    > cooling.
    >
    > --
    > -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    > -- Whiskers
    > -- ~~~~~~~~~~


    That is how i have it,i just said the word desktop to differentiate between
    that and a lappy.
    me, Feb 14, 2010
    #6
  7. me

    me Guest

    "John Holmes" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Mike Easter "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:
    >
    >> me wrote:
    >>> I
    >>> have a desktop pc running in an arcade cabinet,

    >>
    >>> can i do
    >>> this with a laptop,

    >>
    >> I don't understand why you would want to do that with a LT; that is, I
    >> don't understand, can't see/imagine, the 'target' result/purpose in
    >> this scenario.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Who fucking cares what you do or don't understand? The OP must have some
    > reason why he wants to accomplish this and that's not of your fucking
    > business, Mike.
    >
    > --
    > <snip>
    >


    LOL
    me, Feb 14, 2010
    #7
  8. me

    Mike Easter Guest

    John Holmes wrote:
    > Mike Easter
    >> me wrote:
    >>> I
    >>> have a desktop pc running in an arcade cabinet,
    >>> can i do
    >>> this with a laptop,


    >> I don't understand why you would want to do that with a LT; that is, I
    >> don't understand, can't see/imagine, the 'target' result/purpose in
    >> this scenario.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Who fucking cares what you do or don't understand? The OP must have some
    > reason why he wants to accomplish this and that's not of your fucking
    > business, Mike.
    >

    The OP wasn't being truthful (accurate, honest, specific) about what he
    was trying to do.

    He needed to express himself better, more accurately and specifically.
    Now he sez he isn't *actually* trying to put a LT inside an arcade
    cabinet. Big difference.

    I was trying to get him to accurately define what he was working with
    and what he was trying to do with it.

    --
    Mike Easter
    Mike Easter, Feb 14, 2010
    #8
  9. me

    me Guest

    "PeeCee" <> wrote in message
    news:hl8i07$lqj$...
    >
    > "me" <> wrote in message
    > news:4b7797e7$0$15758$...
    >> I know the answer to this as far as desktops go, but not with laptops. I
    >> have a desktop pc running in an arcade cabinet, and have the power button
    >> re-routed to an arcade button, connected to the pins on the motherboard
    >> to turn it on and off, works great. My question is, can i do this with a
    >> laptop, or is it likely that the on-off switch is directly under the
    >> button, and that the button presses the switch directly, rather than
    >> connected via a wire like on a tower pc? If that is the case,i might be
    >> able to desolder the switch and replace it with wires to an external
    >> switch.

    >
    > Most modern Laptops have a PCB style momentary switch like this
    > :http://www.jaycar.co.nz/productView.asp?ID=SP0609 soldered to a circuit
    > board.
    > The on button usually presses directly on this.
    > As they are a normally open there is no reason you can't solder a pair of
    > wires on the back side of the circuit board and run the leads out to a
    > switch mounted in a more convenient location.
    > Because of the high impedance nature of Laptop circuitry you will probably
    > have to filter the lead to avoid phantom triggering.
    >
    > Best
    > Paul.
    >
    >
    >
    >


    Thanks Peecee,soldering should be easy enough once i get the thing apart,but
    what would you suggest as far as a filter goes? Having not done that before,
    i'm not sure what type would be needed.
    me, Feb 14, 2010
    #9
  10. me

    John Holmes Guest

    Mike Easter "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:

    > John Holmes wrote:
    >> Mike Easter
    >>> me wrote:
    >>>> I
    >>>> have a desktop pc running in an arcade cabinet,
    >>>> can i do
    >>>> this with a laptop,

    >
    >>> I don't understand why you would want to do that with a LT; that
    >>> is, I don't understand, can't see/imagine, the 'target'
    >>> result/purpose in this scenario.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> Who fucking cares what you do or don't understand? The OP must have
    >> some reason why he wants to accomplish this and that's not of your
    >> fucking business, Mike.
    >>

    > The OP wasn't being truthful (accurate, honest, specific) about what
    > he was trying to do.
    >
    > He needed to express himself better, more accurately and specifically.
    > Now he sez he isn't *actually* trying to put a LT inside an arcade
    > cabinet. Big difference.
    >
    > I was trying to get him to accurately define what he was working with
    > and what he was trying to do with it.
    >


    That would make an enormous difference on how you would format your
    answer, now wouldn't it?

    --
    <snip>
    John Holmes, Feb 14, 2010
    #10
  11. me

    Mike Easter Guest

    John Holmes wrote:
    > Mike Easter


    >>>> I don't understand why you would want to do that with a LT; that
    >>>> is, I don't understand, can't see/imagine, the 'target'
    >>>> result/purpose in this scenario.


    >> I was trying to get him to accurately define what he was working with
    >> and what he was trying to do with it.
    >>

    >
    > That would make an enormous difference on how you would format your
    > answer, now wouldn't it?
    >

    If he had said, "I'm disassembling a LT to put its caseless parts inside
    an arcade cabinet and I need to figger out how to handle the power
    button." I probably wouldn't have even replied, not ever having
    disassembled a LT.

    If he had said, "I'm going to put an otherwise intact LT inside an
    arcade cabinet and I need to figger out how to relocate the power
    button." I would have (still) replied in the way I did.

    --
    Mike Easter
    Mike Easter, Feb 14, 2010
    #11
  12. me

    chuckcar Guest

    "me" <> wrote in
    news:4b7797e7$0$15758$:

    > I know the answer to this as far as desktops go, but not with laptops.
    > I have a desktop pc running in an arcade cabinet, and have the power
    > button re-routed to an arcade button, connected to the pins on the
    > motherboard to turn it on and off, works great. My question is, can i
    > do this with a laptop, or is it likely that the on-off switch is
    > directly under the button, and that the button presses the switch
    > directly, rather than connected via a wire like on a tower pc? If that
    > is the case,i might be able to desolder the switch and replace it with
    > wires to an external switch.
    >

    Why are you changing to a laptop? why do you need to actually open the
    case? what's wrong with using a power bar?


    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
    chuckcar, Feb 14, 2010
    #12
  13. me

    John Holmes Guest

    Mike Easter "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:

    > John Holmes wrote:
    >> Mike Easter

    >
    >>>>> I don't understand why you would want to do that with a LT; that
    >>>>> is, I don't understand, can't see/imagine, the 'target'
    >>>>> result/purpose in this scenario.

    >
    >>> I was trying to get him to accurately define what he was working with
    >>> and what he was trying to do with it.
    >>>

    >>
    >> That would make an enormous difference on how you would format your
    >> answer, now wouldn't it?
    >>

    > If he had said, "I'm disassembling a LT to put its caseless parts

    inside
    > an arcade cabinet and I need to figger out how to handle the power
    > button." I probably wouldn't have even replied, not ever having
    > disassembled a LT.


    DUH!

    >
    > If he had said, "I'm going to put an otherwise intact LT inside an
    > arcade cabinet and I need to figger out how to relocate the power
    > button." I would have (still) replied in the way I did.
    >


    And then my reply still stands:

    Who fucking cares what you do or don't understand? The OP must have some
    reason why he wants to accomplish this and that's not of your fucking
    business, Mike.

    ;-)
    --
    <snip>
    John Holmes, Feb 14, 2010
    #13
  14. me

    Mike Easter Guest

    John Holmes wrote:

    > And then my reply still stands:
    >
    > The OP must have some
    > reason why he wants to accomplish this and that's not of your fucking
    > business, Mike.


    The majority of the time that people ask questions in this forum, they
    are actually asking the wrong question - seeking an answer which is
    different from the way they asked their question; so then the answer
    they need is actually the answer to a different question they failed to
    ask correctly in the first place.

    The first step is to get to what the problem (actually) is as the
    essential strategy to the inaccurately stated problem's solution.


    --
    Mike Easter
    Mike Easter, Feb 14, 2010
    #14
  15. me

    John Holmes Guest

    Mike Easter "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:

    > The majority of the time that people ask questions in this forum


    This is not a "forum", Mike. This is a newsgroup. Stop trying to educate
    newcomers in this (or other) groups. You're not God or some other kind of
    moderater here.

    --
    <snip>
    John Holmes, Feb 14, 2010
    #15
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