"Coming to a Theater Near You: Digital Films"

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Tarkus, Dec 25, 2003.

  1. Tarkus

    Tarkus Guest

    Coming to a Theater Near You: Digital Films
    Wed Dec 24,12:18 PM ET
    By Bernhard Warner

    LONDON (Reuters) - Grab the popcorn, cinemaphiles. You may be about to
    sit through one of the best movie sequels in years: digital cinema.

    "The digital image is brighter, sharper, the colors are more crisp and
    the image is a bit steadier," says Patrick von Sychowski, an analyst with
    Screen Digest, the British-based media research firm.

    After years of Hollywood hype, 2004 could truly be a watershed year for
    digital cinema. A recent surge in investment by theater chains and
    technology companies means the number of digital projectors in cinemas
    will more than double to over 400 in the next 12 months, Screen Digest
    reports.

    Rest of article:
    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=581&e=2&u=/nm/20031224/tc_nm/column_pluggedin_dc
    --
    "As a producer, and being immature, obviously Porky's and Rock 'n'
    Roll High School give me the opportunity to bring more stupidity
    and childishness to a whole new generation."
    - Howard Stern on producing the upcoming remakes of those films

    Now playing: "Pink Floyd - Master of Ceremonies"
     
    Tarkus, Dec 25, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Tarkus

    Richard C. Guest

    "Tarkus" <> wrote in message
    news:1n7oahpblno07$9.com...
    : Coming to a Theater Near You: Digital Films
    : Wed Dec 24,12:18 PM ET
    : By Bernhard Warner
    :
    : LONDON (Reuters) - Grab the popcorn, cinemaphiles. You may be about to
    : sit through one of the best movie sequels in years: digital cinema.
    :
    : "The digital image is brighter, sharper, the colors are more crisp and
    : the image is a bit steadier," says Patrick von Sychowski, an analyst with
    : Screen Digest, the British-based media research firm.
    :
    : After years of Hollywood hype, 2004 could truly be a watershed year for
    : digital cinema. A recent surge in investment by theater chains and
    : technology companies means the number of digital projectors in cinemas
    : will more than double to over 400 in the next 12 months, Screen Digest
    : reports.
    :
    : Rest of article:
    :
    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=581&e=2&u=/nm/20031224/tc_nm/column_p
    luggedin_dc
    : --
    =============
    Digital Cinema is still not ready for prime time................

    NOTHING yet can compare to real 35mm and 70mm presentations...................
     
    Richard C., Dec 26, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Tarkus

    Mike Davis Guest

    "Richard C." <> wrote in message
    news:3fec4996$0$60642$...
    > "Tarkus" <> wrote in message
    > news:1n7oahpblno07$9.com...
    > : Coming to a Theater Near You: Digital Films
    > : Wed Dec 24,12:18 PM ET
    > : By Bernhard Warner
    > :
    > : LONDON (Reuters) - Grab the popcorn, cinemaphiles. You may be about to
    > : sit through one of the best movie sequels in years: digital cinema.
    > :
    > : "The digital image is brighter, sharper, the colors are more crisp and
    > : the image is a bit steadier," says Patrick von Sychowski, an analyst

    with
    > : Screen Digest, the British-based media research firm.
    > :
    > : After years of Hollywood hype, 2004 could truly be a watershed year for
    > : digital cinema. A recent surge in investment by theater chains and
    > : technology companies means the number of digital projectors in cinemas
    > : will more than double to over 400 in the next 12 months, Screen Digest
    > : reports.
    > :
    > : Rest of article:
    > :
    >

    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=581&e=2&u=/nm/20031224/tc_nm/column_p
    > luggedin_dc
    > : --
    > =============
    > Digital Cinema is still not ready for prime time................
    >
    > NOTHING yet can compare to real 35mm and 70mm

    presentations...................
    >

    Thank you Rich, nice to hear the voice of reason <ggg.>
    To be fair, digital cinema sucks. The resolution is maybe one quarter of
    a true film source, and were talking 35mm, once you move up to 70mm or even
    better IMAX stock all bets are off. Lucas likes it, and I've seen his vision
    firsthand... it sucked.
    I hope it never happens, but the bleeding edge cinema nearby already has
    the projecters, when this goes mainstream I'll simply stop going to movies.
    I already have three (count em') three projectors at home, a Sim2, a
    Vidikron (from Runco) and an HDTV optimized Boxlight for the bedroom. ****
    you George, film still rules.
    All the best and happy holidays, Mike
     
    Mike Davis, Dec 26, 2003
    #3
  4. Tarkus

    Mark B. Guest

    I'm sure it'll be used as an excuse to raise the prices even more.

    Mark



    "Tarkus" <> wrote in message
    news:1n7oahpblno07$9.com...
    > Coming to a Theater Near You: Digital Films
    > Wed Dec 24,12:18 PM ET
    > By Bernhard Warner
    >
    > LONDON (Reuters) - Grab the popcorn, cinemaphiles. You may be about to
    > sit through one of the best movie sequels in years: digital cinema.
    >
    > "The digital image is brighter, sharper, the colors are more crisp and
    > the image is a bit steadier," says Patrick von Sychowski, an analyst with
    > Screen Digest, the British-based media research firm.
    >
    > After years of Hollywood hype, 2004 could truly be a watershed year for
    > digital cinema. A recent surge in investment by theater chains and
    > technology companies means the number of digital projectors in cinemas
    > will more than double to over 400 in the next 12 months, Screen Digest
    > reports.
    >
    > Rest of article:
    >

    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=581&e=2&u=/nm/20031224/tc_nm/column_pluggedin_dc
    > --
    > "As a producer, and being immature, obviously Porky's and Rock 'n'
    > Roll High School give me the opportunity to bring more stupidity
    > and childishness to a whole new generation."
    > - Howard Stern on producing the upcoming remakes of those films
    >
    > Now playing: "Pink Floyd - Master of Ceremonies"
     
    Mark B., Dec 27, 2003
    #4
  5. Tarkus

    Ray Guest

    > I'm sure it'll be used as an excuse to raise the prices even more.

    It should keep the prices the same. Once they go digital, film prints will
    not have to be struck and shipped which is a major cost. The movies will be
    downloaded and then projected. I'm sure that theaters will claim that they
    have to recoup the cost of the new equipment, but who knows??


    "Mark B." <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm sure it'll be used as an excuse to raise the prices even more.
    >
    > Mark
    >
    >
    >
    > "Tarkus" <> wrote in message
    > news:1n7oahpblno07$9.com...
    > > Coming to a Theater Near You: Digital Films
    > > Wed Dec 24,12:18 PM ET
    > > By Bernhard Warner
    > >
    > > LONDON (Reuters) - Grab the popcorn, cinemaphiles. You may be about to
    > > sit through one of the best movie sequels in years: digital cinema.
    > >
    > > "The digital image is brighter, sharper, the colors are more crisp and
    > > the image is a bit steadier," says Patrick von Sychowski, an analyst

    with
    > > Screen Digest, the British-based media research firm.
    > >
    > > After years of Hollywood hype, 2004 could truly be a watershed year for
    > > digital cinema. A recent surge in investment by theater chains and
    > > technology companies means the number of digital projectors in cinemas
    > > will more than double to over 400 in the next 12 months, Screen Digest
    > > reports.
    > >
    > > Rest of article:
    > >

    >

    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=581&e=2&u=/nm/20031224/tc_nm/column_pluggedin_dc
    > > --
    > > "As a producer, and being immature, obviously Porky's and Rock 'n'
    > > Roll High School give me the opportunity to bring more stupidity
    > > and childishness to a whole new generation."
    > > - Howard Stern on producing the upcoming remakes of those films
    > >
    > > Now playing: "Pink Floyd - Master of Ceremonies"

    >
    >
     
    Ray, Dec 27, 2003
    #5
  6. Tarkus

    Tarkus Guest

    On Fri, 26 Dec 2003 21:07:35 -0500, Mark B. wrote:

    > I'm sure it'll be used as an excuse to raise the prices even more.


    Though it will be much cheaper to distribute.
    --
    "All this torturing people gets me HOT!"

    Now playing: "Pink Floyd - Master of Ceremonies"
     
    Tarkus, Dec 27, 2003
    #6
  7. Tarkus

    Peter Briggs Guest

    Mike Davis <> wrote:

    > Lucas likes it, and I've seen his vision
    > firsthand... it sucked.


    With all due respect...I believe you're wrong.

    The Odeon Leicester Square (which, I guess, was the source of the
    original quoted article) has one of the most sophisticated film/digital
    dual systems in the country. I saw "Attack Of The Clones" there, I've
    seen all manner of 70mm and 35 mm movies, and I've seen all of the
    "straight-from-source" Pixar movies there.

    I saw "Toy Story 2" (the first time I'd seen a digitally projected
    movie) in its first week in Burbank, on a not-terribly huge multiplex
    screen, and was rather unimpressed with the stroby/slightly pixelled
    occasionally picture quality. I saw the same movie a while later back
    in Britain on the far-larger Odeon, and the difference was
    night-and-day.

    Every digital showing I've seen at the Odeon has been nothing short of
    stellar, with nothing to complain about from me. I saw "Master and
    Commander" on film on the same screen several weeks ago...boy. I sure
    wish THAT one had been digitally sourced.
     
    Peter Briggs, Dec 27, 2003
    #7
  8. Tarkus

    TCS Guest

    On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 06:15:00 GMT, Ray <> wrote:
    >> I'm sure it'll be used as an excuse to raise the prices even more.


    >It should keep the prices the same. Once they go digital, film prints will
    >not have to be struck and shipped which is a major cost. The movies will be
    >downloaded and then projected. I'm sure that theaters will claim that they
    >have to recoup the cost of the new equipment, but who knows??


    they'll charge more initially because they can. as long as people perceive
    something worth paying extra for, they will pay.


    And until the country has fiber optic cable to the street corner, distribution
    will cost the same. Instead of shipping film prints at major cost, digital
    tapes will be shipped at major cost or a fractional T3 will have to be
    installed at around $2k/month to download more than hour or two of movie per
    day. A t1 would take over 90 hours per movie hour.
     
    TCS, Dec 27, 2003
    #8
  9. Theater near me uses digital projection. Obviously DLP- the rainbow fringing
    annoys the hell out of me.



    Monte Castleman, <<Spamfilter in Use>>
    Bloomington, MN to email, remove the "q" from my address
     
    Monte Castleman, Dec 27, 2003
    #9
  10. Tarkus

    Tarkus Guest

    On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 09:30:25 -0600, TCS wrote:

    > And until the country has fiber optic cable to the street corner, distribution
    > will cost the same. Instead of shipping film prints at major cost, digital
    > tapes will be shipped at major cost or a fractional T3 will have to be
    > installed at around $2k/month to download more than hour or two of movie per
    > day. A t1 would take over 90 hours per movie hour.


    The article mentioned delivery via satellite.

    But even if they used the current delivery method, it would still be much
    cheaper, because they can create digital copies much cheaper and faster.
    --
    "Klaatu borada n... necktie... nickel... It's an "N" word, it's
    definitely an "N" word!"

    Now playing: "Pink Floyd - Master of Ceremonies"
     
    Tarkus, Dec 27, 2003
    #10
  11. On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 12:11:25 -0600, Monte Castleman
    <> wrote:

    >Theater near me uses digital projection. Obviously DLP- the rainbow fringing
    >annoys the hell out of me.


    Commercial DLP does not produce rainbows as they use a 3-chip DLP
    system, not a colour wheel.


    GK
    >
    >
    >
    >Monte Castleman, <<Spamfilter in Use>>
    >Bloomington, MN to email, remove the "q" from my address
    >
     
    The Mad Doctor, Dec 27, 2003
    #11
  12. "TCS" <> wrote in message
    news:625.comcast.net...
    > On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 06:15:00 GMT, Ray <>

    wrote:
    > >> I'm sure it'll be used as an excuse to raise the prices even more.

    >
    > >It should keep the prices the same. Once they go digital, film prints

    will
    > >not have to be struck and shipped which is a major cost. The movies will

    be
    > >downloaded and then projected. I'm sure that theaters will claim that

    they
    > >have to recoup the cost of the new equipment, but who knows??

    >
    > they'll charge more initially because they can. as long as people

    perceive
    > something worth paying extra for, they will pay.
    >
    >
    > And until the country has fiber optic cable to the street corner,

    distribution
    > will cost the same. Instead of shipping film prints at major cost,

    digital
    > tapes will be shipped at major cost or a fractional T3 will have to be
    > installed at around $2k/month to download more than hour or two of movie

    per
    > day. A t1 would take over 90 hours per movie hour.


    Where did you read that?

    I dont remember the article saying anything about how big these movies are,
    digitally.

    Assuming the T1 is downloading at the max for 90 hours, then it takes 61GB
    (gigabytes, not bits) for 1 hour of movie. That works out to a bitrate of
    142,295kbps (kilobits this time) total. That is 17.37mb/s (megabytes/sec).
     
    Anonymous Joe, Dec 27, 2003
    #12
  13. Tarkus

    TCS Guest

    On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 23:35:40 GMT, Anonymous Joe <> wrote:
    >"TCS" <> wrote in message
    >news:625.comcast.net...
    >> On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 06:15:00 GMT, Ray <>

    >wrote:
    >> >> I'm sure it'll be used as an excuse to raise the prices even more.

    >>
    >> >It should keep the prices the same. Once they go digital, film prints

    >will
    >> >not have to be struck and shipped which is a major cost. The movies will

    >be
    >> >downloaded and then projected. I'm sure that theaters will claim that

    >they
    >> >have to recoup the cost of the new equipment, but who knows??

    >>
    >> they'll charge more initially because they can. as long as people

    >perceive
    >> something worth paying extra for, they will pay.
    >>
    >>
    >> And until the country has fiber optic cable to the street corner,

    >distribution
    >> will cost the same. Instead of shipping film prints at major cost,

    >digital
    >> tapes will be shipped at major cost or a fractional T3 will have to be
    >> installed at around $2k/month to download more than hour or two of movie

    >per
    >> day. A t1 would take over 90 hours per movie hour.


    >Where did you read that?


    >I dont remember the article saying anything about how big these movies are,
    >digitally.


    A piece of shit consumer digital camera is 5MP. A 35mm consumer film
    camera is usually estimated to be equivelent to about 25MP. I would expect
    profesional film to be equivelent to four times that, 100MP, or 300MB/frame.
    That 450GB/hr, w/ compression, perhaps 90GB/hr.

    >Assuming the T1 is downloading at the max for 90 hours, then it takes 61GB
    >(gigabytes, not bits) for 1 hour of movie. That works out to a bitrate of
    >142,295kbps (kilobits this time) total. That is 17.37mb/s (megabytes/sec).
     
    TCS, Dec 28, 2003
    #13
  14. Tarkus

    Mutley Guest

    "Ray" <> wrote:

    >> I'm sure it'll be used as an excuse to raise the prices even more.

    >
    >It should keep the prices the same. Once they go digital, film prints will
    >not have to be struck and shipped which is a major cost. The movies will be
    >downloaded and then projected. I'm sure that theaters will claim that they
    >have to recoup the cost of the new equipment, but who knows??
    >


    Bet the prices go up. How much to outfit a theater in Digital.
    $200K??

    And how long before the gear becomes obsolete? 5 years.

    A 35/70mm projector costs about $10K and will last for 50 years..
     
    Mutley, Dec 28, 2003
    #14
  15. Tarkus

    Mark B. Guest

    "Mutley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Ray" <> wrote:
    >
    > >> I'm sure it'll be used as an excuse to raise the prices even more.

    > >
    > >It should keep the prices the same. Once they go digital, film prints

    will
    > >not have to be struck and shipped which is a major cost. The movies will

    be
    > >downloaded and then projected. I'm sure that theaters will claim that

    they
    > >have to recoup the cost of the new equipment, but who knows??
    > >

    >
    > Bet the prices go up. How much to outfit a theater in Digital.
    > $200K??
    >
    > And how long before the gear becomes obsolete? 5 years.
    >
    > A 35/70mm projector costs about $10K and will last for 50 years..
    >
    >


    My point exactly. They'll raise prices now to recoup the extra costs in a
    very short period of time.

    Mark
     
    Mark B., Dec 28, 2003
    #15
  16. >>Theater near me uses digital projection. Obviously DLP- the rainbow fringing
    >>annoys the hell out of me.

    >
    >Commercial DLP does not produce rainbows as they use a 3-chip DLP
    >system, not a colour wheel.


    Well, you'd think a commercial movie theater could afford a commercial
    projector then. This one was definately 1-chip DLP!

    Any chance of 3-chip DLP becoming affordable for consumer projectors? Now it
    seems the major choices are 3-chip LCD or 1-chip DLP.

    Straying farther off topic, are 1/2 or full resolution HDTV projectors in the
    works?

    --
    --^\____
    | /
    | / Monte Castleman, <<Spamfilter in Use>>
    | | Bloomington, MN to email, remove the "q" from my address
    | *|
    |_____\ http://www.geocities.com/xtremephotos/roads/roadindex.html
     
    Monte Castleman, Dec 28, 2003
    #16
  17. Tarkus

    John Savard Guest

    On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 12:43:02 +0000,
    pete@DIESPAMDIE!cinescribe.demon.co.uk (Peter Briggs) wrote, in part:

    >The Odeon Leicester Square (which, I guess, was the source of the
    >original quoted article) has one of the most sophisticated film/digital
    >dual systems in the country. I saw "Attack Of The Clones" there, I've
    >seen all manner of 70mm and 35 mm movies, and I've seen all of the
    >"straight-from-source" Pixar movies there.


    I saw the Lucas movies on 35mm prints in multiplex theatres, but still
    with reasonably big screens. I didn't see any noticeable degradation
    in resolution over real film, even though those prints were made from
    the digital source material, and I do remember seeing very clearly the
    raster lines in 200 Motels when I saw that in a theatre ages ago (as
    part of a double feature with the movie I really came to see).

    So, apparently, digital cinema is satisfactory, despite the apparent
    lesser resolution of the source material. (Obviously, seeing the film
    in a digital theatre could only be better, since one would be closer
    to the source material.)

    John Savard
    http://home.ecn.ab.ca/~jsavard/index.html
     
    John Savard, Dec 28, 2003
    #17
  18. On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 01:25:18 -0600, Monte Castleman
    <> wrote:

    >>>Theater near me uses digital projection. Obviously DLP- the rainbow fringing
    >>>annoys the hell out of me.

    >>
    >>Commercial DLP does not produce rainbows as they use a 3-chip DLP
    >>system, not a colour wheel.

    >
    >Well, you'd think a commercial movie theater could afford a commercial
    >projector then. This one was definately 1-chip DLP!


    You are imagining things, there isn't a 1 chip DLP with enough pixels
    or a high enough power lamp to do a commercial screen, most 1 chip
    DLPs are pushing their max output at about 120 inches wide
    >
    >Any chance of 3-chip DLP becoming affordable for consumer projectors? Now it
    >seems the major choices are 3-chip LCD or 1-chip DLP.


    3 chop DLP are available, for about 30,000 US, designed for the home
    theatre market
    >
    >Straying farther off topic, are 1/2 or full resolution HDTV projectors in the
    >works?


    both are available.

    GK
     
    The Mad Doctor, Dec 28, 2003
    #18
  19. Tarkus

    Peter Briggs Guest

    John Savard <> wrote:

    > So, apparently, digital cinema is satisfactory, despite the apparent
    > lesser resolution of the source material. (Obviously, seeing the film
    > in a digital theatre could only be better, since one would be closer
    > to the source material.)


    Absolutely, John. This was one of those "hauled under lock-and-key"
    from Lucasfilm hard-drives.

    I was also sitting in the front row of the stalls (about as close as I
    could be), and was looking out specifically for things like
    raster-judder in title and subtitle fonts. Couldn't see it. Bright,
    wonderful image. Detritus free. Perfect. Made me a convert, as far as
    live action goes (although, the Pixar stuff did that already for the
    CG-sourced stuff.)
     
    Peter Briggs, Dec 29, 2003
    #19
  20. Tarkus

    Eric R. Guest

    "Richard C." <> wrote in message

    > NOTHING yet can compare to real 35mm and 70mm presentations...................


    Yeah, especially when most of them are shown with worn 3rd generation
    prints and projected by teenagers who don't know how to focus or clean
    a projector.

    -Eric
     
    Eric R., Dec 29, 2003
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.

Share This Page