Comet Holmes

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Nov 2, 2007.

  1. There is a very bright comet that is easy to photograph.
    The comet 17/P Holmes is in the constellation Perseus and
    underwent a 17-million fold increase in brightness in
    mid October. It can be viewed in most cities where it
    appears about half the diameter of the moon, and from a
    dark country sky the fainter outer portion is larger than
    the full moon. It is a nice view in binoculars, but the
    tail is very faint.

    Exposures up to 2 seconds at f/4 ISO 1600 are about the
    maximum to prevent overexposure.

    Example image: 36 1-second exposures added:
    http://www.clarkvision.com/gallerie...web/comet.holmes.c10.31.2007.36s2.d-c800.html

    To view the comet, google comet Holmes position and you should
    get several charts to use for locating the comet. It appears
    in the northeastern sky in the evening.

    Roger
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Nov 2, 2007
    #1
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  2. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    Charles Guest

    On Fri, 02 Nov 2007 07:48:20 -0600, "Roger N. Clark (change username
    to rnclark)" <> wrote:

    >There is a very bright comet that is easy to photograph.
    >The comet 17/P Holmes is in the constellation Perseus and
    >underwent a 17-million fold increase in brightness in
    >mid October. It can be viewed in most cities where it
    >appears about half the diameter of the moon, and from a
    >dark country sky the fainter outer portion is larger than
    >the full moon. It is a nice view in binoculars, but the
    >tail is very faint.
    >
    >Exposures up to 2 seconds at f/4 ISO 1600 are about the
    >maximum to prevent overexposure.
    >
    >Example image: 36 1-second exposures added:
    >http://www.clarkvision.com/gallerie...web/comet.holmes.c10.31.2007.36s2.d-c800.html
    >
    >To view the comet, google comet Holmes position and you should
    >get several charts to use for locating the comet. It appears
    >in the northeastern sky in the evening.
    >
    >Roger



    Several pictures have been posted in alt.binaries.pictures.astro.
    Charles, Nov 2, 2007
    #2
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  3. Thanks

    "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > There is a very bright comet that is easy to photograph.
    > The comet 17/P Holmes is in the constellation Perseus and
    > underwent a 17-million fold increase in brightness in
    > mid October. It can be viewed in most cities where it
    > appears about half the diameter of the moon, and from a
    > dark country sky the fainter outer portion is larger than
    > the full moon. It is a nice view in binoculars, but the
    > tail is very faint.
    >
    > Exposures up to 2 seconds at f/4 ISO 1600 are about the
    > maximum to prevent overexposure.
    >
    > Example image: 36 1-second exposures added:
    > http://www.clarkvision.com/gallerie...web/comet.holmes.c10.31.2007.36s2.d-c800.html
    >
    > To view the comet, google comet Holmes position and you should
    > get several charts to use for locating the comet. It appears
    > in the northeastern sky in the evening.
    >
    > Roger


    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia 's Muire duit
    Joseph Meehan, Nov 2, 2007
    #3
  4. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    bentley Jr Guest

    On Fri, 02 Nov 2007 13:52:58 GMT, Charles <> wrote:

    >
    >Several pictures have been posted in alt.binaries.pictures.astro.


    Thanks. I'd much rather go there than add one more click to that lousy spammer
    Roger Clark's site. There's just no getting away from that spammer unless
    everyone put it in their spam filters and never replied to or quoted it.
    bentley Jr, Nov 2, 2007
    #4
  5. David J Taylor, Nov 2, 2007
    #5
  6. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    Pat Guest

    On Nov 2, 9:48 am, "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)"
    <> wrote:
    > There is a very bright comet that is easy to photograph.
    > The comet 17/P Holmes is in the constellation Perseus and
    > underwent a 17-million fold increase in brightness in
    > mid October. It can be viewed in most cities where it
    > appears about half the diameter of the moon, and from a
    > dark country sky the fainter outer portion is larger than
    > the full moon. It is a nice view in binoculars, but the
    > tail is very faint.
    >
    > Exposures up to 2 seconds at f/4 ISO 1600 are about the
    > maximum to prevent overexposure.
    >
    > Example image: 36 1-second exposures added:http://www.clarkvision.com/galleries/gallery.astrophoto-1/web/comet.h...
    >
    > To view the comet, google comet Holmes position and you should
    > get several charts to use for locating the comet. It appears
    > in the northeastern sky in the evening.
    >
    > Roger


    Just out of curiosity, it is going to turn and give us a tail or is it
    going to continue to barrel straight at us until it hits us with such
    force that it wipes out life on earth, as we know it?
    Pat, Nov 2, 2007
    #6
  7. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    gerald-arden Guest

    On Fri, 02 Nov 2007, bentley Jr wrote:

    >On Fri, 02 Nov 2007 13:52:58 GMT, Charles <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>Several pictures have been posted in alt.binaries.pictures.astro.

    >
    >Thanks. I'd much rather go there than add one more click to that lousy spammer
    >Roger Clark's site. There's just no getting away from that spammer unless
    >everyone put it in their spam filters and never replied to or quoted it.
    >
    >


    It's also nice to see better images of the comet in the
    alt.binaries.pictures.astro group. It's nice to see what people can do with
    their camera gear when they know a little something about photography.
    gerald-arden, Nov 2, 2007
    #7
  8. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    Guest

    On Nov 2, 11:48 pm, "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)"
    <> wrote:
    > There is a very bright comet that is easy to photograph.
    > The comet 17/P Holmes is in the constellation Perseus and
    > underwent a 17-million fold increase in brightness in
    > mid October. It can be viewed in most cities where it
    > appears about half the diameter of the moon, and from a
    > dark country sky the fainter outer portion is larger than
    > the full moon. It is a nice view in binoculars, but the
    > tail is very faint.
    >
    > Exposures up to 2 seconds at f/4 ISO 1600 are about the
    > maximum to prevent overexposure.
    >
    > Example image: 36 1-second exposures added:http://www.clarkvision.com/galleries/gallery.astrophoto-1/web/comet.h...
    >
    > To view the comet, google comet Holmes position and you should
    > get several charts to use for locating the comet. It appears
    > in the northeastern sky in the evening.
    >
    > Roger


    Thanks for the heads up, Roger, but sadly some of us are in the
    southern hemisphere... )O:

    But I guess it's your turn after us getting the best of McNaught...
    , Nov 2, 2007
    #8
  9. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    Jeff R. Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Thanks for the heads up, Roger, but sadly some of us are in the
    > southern hemisphere... )O:
    >
    > But I guess it's your turn after us getting the best of McNaught...


    Nyeaahhh... Whadd'ya want? An easy life?

    At 1:15am tomorrow (Sunday) it'll be 5 degrees above the horizon.
    (Coincidentally, 5 degrees azimuth, too)

    That's covered by trees and stuff where I live (NW Syd), but you might be
    luckier. Where are you, Mark?

    --
    Jeff R.
    Jeff R., Nov 2, 2007
    #9
  10. gerald-arden wrote:
    > On Fri, 02 Nov 2007, bentley Jr wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 02 Nov 2007 13:52:58 GMT, Charles <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Several pictures have been posted in alt.binaries.pictures.astro.

    >> Thanks. I'd much rather go there than add one more click to that lousy spammer
    >> Roger Clark's site. There's just no getting away from that spammer unless
    >> everyone put it in their spam filters and never replied to or quoted it.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > It's also nice to see better images of the comet in the
    > alt.binaries.pictures.astro group. It's nice to see what people can do with
    > their camera gear when they know a little something about photography.
    >

    HaHa.
    Everyone should be aware that this and Bently Jr. is the infamous P&S troll
    who has been haunting these newsgroups. It constantly changes
    its name. The headers and its style of insults give it away.
    It is best to ignore it.
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Nov 3, 2007
    #10
  11. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    LOL Guest

    On Fri, 02 Nov 2007 18:28:43 -0600, "Roger N. Clark (change username to
    rnclark)" <> wrote:

    >gerald-arden wrote:
    >> On Fri, 02 Nov 2007, bentley Jr wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Fri, 02 Nov 2007 13:52:58 GMT, Charles <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Several pictures have been posted in alt.binaries.pictures.astro.
    >>> Thanks. I'd much rather go there than add one more click to that lousy spammer
    >>> Roger Clark's site. There's just no getting away from that spammer unless
    >>> everyone put it in their spam filters and never replied to or quoted it.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> It's also nice to see better images of the comet in the
    >> alt.binaries.pictures.astro group. It's nice to see what people can do with
    >> their camera gear when they know a little something about photography.
    >>

    >HaHa.
    >Everyone should be aware that this and Bently Jr. is the infamous P&S troll
    >who has been haunting these newsgroups. It constantly changes
    >its name. The headers and its style of insults give it away.
    >It is best to ignore it.


    HaHa
    Everyone should know that you're WRONG again!

    LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    It's nice to see that I'm not the ONLY one that realizes your photography is
    pure crap. Anyone visiting the astro photo newsgroup can see what a waste of
    money your camera was. Wasted on someone with no talent and no skill too. Every
    one of the photos posted there is FAR BETTER than yours!

    LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    LOL, Nov 3, 2007
    #11
  12. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    acl Guest

    On Nov 3, 3:28 am, "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)"
    <> wrote:


    > It is best to ignore it.


    Yes!

    He's now seriously pathetic, having conversations with himself!
    Seriously, think about it: this is some actual person, sitting
    somewhere in front of a computer, and posts to some newsgroup
    pretending to be many people having conversations with each other! I
    am literally laughing out loud as I type this.

    People are strange!
    acl, Nov 3, 2007
    #12
  13. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    LOL Guest

    On Fri, 02 Nov 2007 17:41:43 -0700, acl <> wrote:

    >On Nov 3, 3:28 am, "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)"
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> It is best to ignore it.

    >
    >Yes!
    >
    >He's now seriously pathetic, having conversations with himself!
    >Seriously, think about it: this is some actual person, sitting
    >somewhere in front of a computer, and posts to some newsgroup
    >pretending to be many people having conversations with each other! I
    >am literally laughing out loud as I type this.
    >
    >People are strange!


    The only thing worth lauging at is YOU and Roger!

    LOL!!!!!!!!!!!

    The photos in that newsgroup PROVE that Roger is an untalented ASS!

    LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    LOL, Nov 3, 2007
    #13
  14. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    Pat Guest

    On Nov 2, 8:45 pm, LOL <> wrote:
    > On Fri, 02 Nov 2007 17:41:43 -0700, acl <> wrote:
    > >On Nov 3, 3:28 am, "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)"
    > ><> wrote:

    >
    > >> It is best to ignore it.

    >
    > >Yes!

    >
    > >He's now seriously pathetic, having conversations with himself!
    > >Seriously, think about it: this is some actual person, sitting
    > >somewhere in front of a computer, and posts to some newsgroup
    > >pretending to be many people having conversations with each other! I
    > >am literally laughing out loud as I type this.

    >
    > >People are strange!

    >
    > The only thing worth lauging at is YOU and Roger!
    >
    > LOL!!!!!!!!!!!
    >
    > The photos in that newsgroup PROVE that Roger is an untalented ASS!
    >
    > LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


    Did someone forget to take their meds this morning?
    Pat, Nov 3, 2007
    #14
  15. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    Guest

    On Nov 3, 8:40 am, "Jeff R." <> wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    >
    >
    > > Thanks for the heads up, Roger, but sadly some of us are in the
    > > southern hemisphere... )O:

    >
    > > But I guess it's your turn after us getting the best of McNaught...

    >
    > Nyeaahhh... Whadd'ya want? An easy life?
    >
    > At 1:15am tomorrow (Sunday) it'll be 5 degrees above the horizon.
    > (Coincidentally, 5 degrees azimuth, too)
    >
    > That's covered by trees and stuff where I live (NW Syd), but you might be
    > luckier. Where are you, Mark?
    >
    > --
    > Jeff R.


    Just south of Brisbane. So my chances are a little better - I'll have
    a look at the sky charts a little more closely and see if I want to
    get motivated..

    Thanks, Jeff.
    , Nov 3, 2007
    #15
  16. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    Guest

    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark) wrote:
    > There is a very bright comet that is easy to photograph.
    > The comet 17/P Holmes is in the constellation Perseus and
    > underwent a 17-million fold increase in brightness in
    > mid October. It can be viewed in most cities where it
    > appears about half the diameter of the moon, and from a
    > dark country sky the fainter outer portion is larger than
    > the full moon. It is a nice view in binoculars, but the
    > tail is very faint.
    >
    > Exposures up to 2 seconds at f/4 ISO 1600 are about the
    > maximum to prevent overexposure.
    >
    > Example image: 36 1-second exposures added:
    > http://www.clarkvision.com/gallerie...web/comet.holmes.c10.31.2007.36s2.d-c800.html
    >
    > To view the comet, google comet Holmes position and you should
    > get several charts to use for locating the comet. It appears
    > in the northeastern sky in the evening.
    >
    > Roger


    Roger:
    I don't know the sky at all.... and unfortunately could not read the
    constellation chart either. But I know direction compass, and degrees
    from horizon. If you live in the American's midwest, when and where do
    you have to look for the comet?
    How long this comet willl show up in the sky?
    Thanks for the information.
    , Nov 3, 2007
    #16
  17. wrote:

    > Roger:
    > I don't know the sky at all.... and unfortunately could not read the
    > constellation chart either. But I know direction compass, and degrees
    > from horizon. If you live in the American's midwest, when and where do
    > you have to look for the comet?
    > How long this comet willl show up in the sky?
    > Thanks for the information.
    >

    If you look in the northwest and scan with binoculars
    (or unaided eye from a dark location away from cities)
    you should be able to find the comet in a short time.
    At sunset it is very low in the sky, and near midnight
    it is overhead, so you can project in between. If you
    see the constellation Cassiopeia, which looks like a W
    standing on end (90 degrees from a normal W), the comet
    is below the W and a little to the right.

    We should have good views for about a month, but the next
    two weeks will be best, before the moon shows up in the evening
    again. The comet may be fading as the cloud of gas and
    dust expands, so the sooner the better.

    Good luck.

    Roger
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Nov 3, 2007
    #17
  18. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    Jeff R. Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...

    >
    > Just south of Brisbane. So my chances are a little better - I'll have
    > a look at the sky charts a little more closely and see if I want to
    > get motivated..



    Brisbane: nearly 12 degrees up, due N, at 2am. Better than here - possibly
    out of the murk.

    Sadly, it doen't get much better for me over the next few months. :-(
    (just marginally)

    (22 degrees up at Cairns, BTW)

    --
    Jeff R.
    Jeff R., Nov 3, 2007
    #18
  19. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    Cynicor Guest

    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark) wrote:
    > There is a very bright comet that is easy to photograph.
    > The comet 17/P Holmes is in the constellation Perseus and
    > underwent a 17-million fold increase in brightness in
    > mid October. It can be viewed in most cities where it
    > appears about half the diameter of the moon, and from a
    > dark country sky the fainter outer portion is larger than
    > the full moon. It is a nice view in binoculars, but the
    > tail is very faint.
    >
    > Exposures up to 2 seconds at f/4 ISO 1600 are about the
    > maximum to prevent overexposure.
    >
    > Example image: 36 1-second exposures added:
    > http://www.clarkvision.com/gallerie...web/comet.holmes.c10.31.2007.36s2.d-c800.html


    NO WAY. I'm not going to visit your lousy spammers site to see...er...a
    bunch of professional photos with no ads or sales pitches on them,
    posted for the benefit of others.

    You're living in the Southwest, right? How's the light pollution down
    near you? I'm in the "red" zone on Long Island, although Montauk has one
    of the few places in the Northeast still in the "green" zone, and you
    can still get some nice Milky Way views there.
    http://www.astropix.com/HTML/H_OTHER/SATPOL1.HTM
    Cynicor, Nov 3, 2007
    #19
  20. Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)

    Cynicor Guest

    Cynicor, Nov 3, 2007
    #20
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