Color Balance

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by ShutterNut, Oct 3, 2004.

  1. ShutterNut

    ShutterNut Guest

    Setting a custom white balance using a grey card in the lighting of the job
    helps immensely. Thus one can lock in the color balance for that session.
    Nikon should have a procedure for this in their owners manual, I know Canon
    does.

    JS
    ShutterNut, Oct 3, 2004
    #1
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  2. ShutterNut

    GT40 Guest

    On Sun, 3 Oct 2004 13:20:19 -0700, "ShutterNut" <>
    wrote:

    >Setting a custom white balance using a grey card in the lighting of the job
    >helps immensely. Thus one can lock in the color balance for that session.
    >Nikon should have a procedure for this in their owners manual, I know Canon
    >does.


    I know that Nikon D1h did
    GT40, Oct 3, 2004
    #2
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  3. For those who don't know...Either side of the grey card can be used for a
    white balance as the grey side is a neutral shade color wise. Only the grey
    side should be used for metering...unless you have some very strange needs.
    There are products for twisting and warping the color balance. I consulted
    on one called WarmCards (disclaimer) www.warmcards.com . The concept was
    developed for video but adapts well for digital also...basically the same
    technology in this regard. By selecting the properly shaded card you can
    warm your shot up like it was taken during the golden hour...or adjust for
    fluorescent lighting. The digital pack also has a KODAK grey card.


    "ShutterNut" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Setting a custom white balance using a grey card in the lighting of the

    job
    > helps immensely. Thus one can lock in the color balance for that session.
    > Nikon should have a procedure for this in their owners manual, I know

    Canon
    > does.
    >
    > JS
    >
    >
    Gene Palmiter, Oct 3, 2004
    #3
  4. Gene Palmiter wrote:
    > For those who don't know...Either side of the grey card can be used
    > for a white balance as the grey side is a neutral shade color wise.


    In percentage correct terms - is the white or the grey side the better for
    colour balance? It seems to me more likely that you can get white nearer
    to true white than you can get grey nearer to true grey.

    Cheers,
    David
    David J Taylor, Oct 4, 2004
    #4
  5. "David J Taylor" <-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk>
    schrieb im Newsbeitrag news:0x78d.2081$...
    > Gene Palmiter wrote:
    > > For those who don't know...Either side of the grey card can be used
    > > for a white balance as the grey side is a neutral shade color wise.

    >
    > In percentage correct terms - is the white or the grey side the better for
    > colour balance? It seems to me more likely that you can get white nearer
    > to true white than you can get grey nearer to true grey.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > David
    >
    >
    Johannes Czernin, Oct 4, 2004
    #5
  6. Color Balance - The devil might be in the card! :)

    A good question you posed here!

    Quite some time ago I bought gray/white card from a German manufacturer -
    see their Web site at http://fotowand.net/ and ever since I have been using
    it I have noticed a discrepancy between the WB set with the gray and with
    the white side.

    A while later I accquired an ExpoDisc and as I now use that for most of my
    WB settings I set down one day and ran a few controlled tests, checking the
    results with the color sampler tool in Photoshop.

    What I found out is quite amazing: The gray side of my expensive card is way
    off neutral whilst the white side corresponds within working tolerances with
    what I get with the ExpoDisc.

    As to the exposure measuring part of the business the gray side is
    acceptably "neutral" whilst the white side nicely falls in the +2EV setting.

    In view of this revealing experience I have decided never again to use the
    gray side of my card for WB determination. Of course this does not restrict
    me at all as I use the ExpoDisc whenever possible and and fall back to the
    card only in those situations when a direct incident reading cannot be made.
    And even then, by the way, using the white side allows me to do a WB setting
    under much lower lighting conditions than would be possible with the gray
    side.

    Hope this helps,

    Kind regards,

    Johannes

    "David J Taylor" <-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk>
    wrote in message news:0x78d.2081$...
    > Gene Palmiter wrote:
    > > For those who don't know...Either side of the grey card can be used
    > > for a white balance as the grey side is a neutral shade color wise.

    >
    > In percentage correct terms - is the white or the grey side the better for
    > colour balance? It seems to me more likely that you can get white nearer
    > to true white than you can get grey nearer to true grey.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > David
    >
    >
    Johannes Czernin, Oct 4, 2004
    #6
  7. "David J Taylor"
    <-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk> wrote in
    news:0x78d.2081$:

    > In percentage correct terms - is the white or the grey side the better
    > for colour balance? It seems to me more likely that you can get white
    > nearer to true white than you can get grey nearer to true grey.


    Making a white card is trivial. You have your home full of them.
    Making a grey card is difficult - even more difficult making
    one that stays grey over time. Really difficult. So ... I
    would bet on the white side being most accurate. Personally
    I don't think I would care about the grey one at all.


    /Roland
    Roland Karlsson, Oct 4, 2004
    #7
  8. "Roland Karlsson" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9578D9FACCFBBklotjohan@130.133.1.4...
    SNIP
    > Making a white card is trivial. You have your home full of them.


    Careful! If you think of paper, it can have optical brightener, or it
    can turn yellow with exposure to light. Other objects in the house may
    collect all sorts of airborne pollution, even more so in a smoker's
    environment.

    > Making a grey card is difficult - even more difficult making
    > one that stays grey over time. Really difficult.


    Yes very true, although there are some quality products available for
    airbrush technique, both spectrally neutral and fade resistant (not
    only gray or white). The most trouble is in getting the right shade of
    gray if one needs a certain reflectance.

    Bart
    Bart van der Wolf, Oct 5, 2004
    #8
  9. ShutterNut

    John Bean Guest

    On Tue, 5 Oct 2004 01:13:36 +0200, Bart van der Wolf wrote:

    > "Roland Karlsson" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns9578D9FACCFBBklotjohan@130.133.1.4...
    > SNIP
    >> Making a white card is trivial. You have your home full of them.

    >
    > Careful! If you think of paper, it can have optical brightener, or it
    > can turn yellow with exposure to light. Other objects in the house may
    > collect all sorts of airborne pollution, even more so in a smoker's
    > environment.


    Indeed, how white is white?

    In fact a lot of people including me prefer a slightly warm balance. I'm a
    cheapskate so I use white copy paper then apply a slight adjustment in the
    camera, but for the perfectionists there are products favoured by video
    makers over the years, like this example: http://www.warmcards.com/ .

    --
    John Bean

    Computers make it easier to do a lot of things, but most of the things they
    make it easier to do don't need to be done (Andy Rooney)
    John Bean, Oct 5, 2004
    #9
  10. On Tue, 5 Oct 2004 01:13:36 +0200, "Bart van der Wolf"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Roland Karlsson" <> wrote in message
    >news:Xns9578D9FACCFBBklotjohan@130.133.1.4...
    >SNIP
    >> Making a white card is trivial. You have your home full of them.

    >
    >Careful! If you think of paper, it can have optical brightener, or it
    >can turn yellow with exposure to light. Other objects in the house may
    >collect all sorts of airborne pollution, even more so in a smoker's
    >environment.
    >
    >> Making a grey card is difficult - even more difficult making
    >> one that stays grey over time. Really difficult.

    >
    >Yes very true, although there are some quality products available for
    >airbrush technique, both spectrally neutral and fade resistant (not
    >only gray or white). The most trouble is in getting the right shade of
    >gray if one needs a certain reflectance.


    OTOH I've found gray cards to be readily available and inexpensive.

    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com
    >
    >Bart
    Roger Halstead, Oct 5, 2004
    #10
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