COLD weather

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Guest, Jan 19, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I have this new D70 ready to shoot. It's FREEZING out there. Does cold
    weather affect the camera itself and is it harmful to it? I guess I should
    read the specifications about operating temp ranges. It's actually about 3
    degrees here with the wind chill. That may not be good for an expensive lens
    or the internal components of the camera. Damn, I wanna take some pictures.
    Spring time is usually the perfect time though....and that will be here
    eventually.
     
    Guest, Jan 19, 2005
    #1
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  2. Guest

    rafe bustin Guest

    On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 23:43:01 -0500, <> wrote:

    >I have this new D70 ready to shoot. It's FREEZING out there. Does cold
    >weather affect the camera itself and is it harmful to it? I guess I should
    >read the specifications about operating temp ranges. It's actually about 3
    >degrees here with the wind chill. That may not be good for an expensive lens
    >or the internal components of the camera. Damn, I wanna take some pictures.
    >Spring time is usually the perfect time though....and that will be here
    >eventually.



    The camera's battery is likely to be
    less effective in the cold. Keep a
    spare battery inside your clothing,
    close to your body to keep it warm.

    Your camera doesn't feel wind chill,
    so the air temperature is all that
    matters. Wind chill only matters to
    humans, and only where there is
    exposed skin.

    The biggest "danger" to the camera is
    taking it back inside after it's been
    cold for a long time -- condensation
    is something to watch out for. Not
    generally dangerous, but it will make
    the camera unusable until it warms up.


    rafe b.
    http://www.terrapinphoto.com
     
    rafe bustin, Jan 19, 2005
    #2
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  3. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have this new D70 ready to shoot. It's FREEZING out there. Does cold
    > weather affect the camera itself and is it harmful to it? I guess I should
    > read the specifications about operating temp ranges. It's actually about 3
    > degrees here with the wind chill. That may not be good for an expensive
    > lens
    > or the internal components of the camera. Damn, I wanna take some
    > pictures.
    > Spring time is usually the perfect time though....and that will be here
    > eventually.


    Just spent 2 days along the Blue Ridge Parkway (NC and VA) with my Canon
    300D. Monday started out at around 10F and didn't get over 30F. I was out
    for well over 2 hours first thing in the morning and then at least an hour
    at each stop along the way. The camera got a fair amount of cold weather
    exposure and performed perfectly.

    --

    Rob
     
    Robert R Kircher, Jr., Jan 19, 2005
    #3
  4. Guest

    Bigguy Guest

    Before you bring the (cold) camera into the (warm) house, seal it in a
    plastic freezer bag. Allow it to warm up in the house and any condensation
    will form on the outside of the bag not inside the camera...

    Keep spare batteries warm while outside (in an inside pocket).

    Guy

    wrote:
    > I have this new D70 ready to shoot. It's FREEZING out there. Does cold
    > weather affect the camera itself and is it harmful to it? I guess I
    > should read the specifications about operating temp ranges. It's
    > actually about 3 degrees here with the wind chill. That may not be
    > good for an expensive lens or the internal components of the camera.
    > Damn, I wanna take some pictures. Spring time is usually the perfect
    > time though....and that will be here eventually.
     
    Bigguy, Jan 19, 2005
    #4
  5. Guest

    Charlie Self Guest

    Rob Kircher responds:

    ><> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>I have this new D70 ready to shoot. It's FREEZING out there. Does cold
    >> weather affect the camera itself and is it harmful to it? I guess I should
    >> read the specifications about operating temp ranges. It's actually about 3
    >> degrees here with the wind chill. That may not be good for an expensive
    >> lens
    >> or the internal components of the camera. Damn, I wanna take some
    >> pictures.
    >> Spring time is usually the perfect time though....and that will be here
    >> eventually.

    >
    >Just spent 2 days along the Blue Ridge Parkway (NC and VA) with my Canon
    >300D. Monday started out at around 10F and didn't get over 30F. I was out
    >for well over 2 hours first thing in the morning and then at least an hour
    >at each stop along the way. The camera got a fair amount of cold weather
    >exposure and performed perfectly.
    >


    IIRC, back in the good old days when I used a Canon F1, shooting motorcycle ice
    races around Glens Falls, NY, the biggest worry was about shutter linkages and
    film advance and rewind. Basically, back then, you'd send the camera in for
    cold weather treatment (we're talking below zero, F., here, often as much as 15
    below and windy). If I was properly informed, said treatment consisted mainly
    of removing normal lubricants and either leaving them off or replacing them
    with very, very, very light versions.

    Film wind and rewind was a bigger problem. Motor drives could advance film fast
    enough to cause static streaks, as could fast manual rewinding. Thus sequence
    shots were more difficult. Rewind static was easy to cure. Just be more
    deliberate, slower.

    I don't see much chance for problems with an electronic camera that has an
    electronic shutter. Curtain shutters, though, could be a problem, if they
    stick, but 10F isn't that cold.

    Charlie Self
    "One of the common denominators I have found is that expectations rise above
    that which is expected." George W. Bush
     
    Charlie Self, Jan 19, 2005
    #5
  6. Guest

    Jim Townsend Guest

    wrote:

    > I have this new D70 ready to shoot. It's FREEZING out there. Does cold
    > weather affect the camera itself and is it harmful to it? I guess I should
    > read the specifications about operating temp ranges. It's actually about 3
    > degrees here with the wind chill. That may not be good for an expensive lens
    > or the internal components of the camera. Damn, I wanna take some pictures.
    > Spring time is usually the perfect time though....and that will be here
    > eventually.


    If Nikon is like most manufactureres, they only guarantee the camera
    will work within specs down to 0C / 32F

    I've had my Canon 10D out on a tripod for 1/2 an hour at -35C / -31F.
    The battery lasted, but I had to call it quits when the AF in my
    Sigma 15-30 ground to a halt.

    When I was done, the camera was so cold I couldn't touch it with
    my bare hands without feeling pain.

    I didn't plan to have it out in the extreme cold for that long, but
    I got carried away with what I was doing.. (Taking moonlit landscapes).

    It was -40C / -40F here last week, but I never took the camera outdoors.
    (To heck with the camera too cold for ME :)
     
    Jim Townsend, Jan 19, 2005
    #6
  7. Guest

    Robert Scott Guest

    "Charlie Self" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >

    > IIRC, back in the good old days when I used a Canon F1, shooting
    > motorcycle ice
    > races around Glens Falls, NY,


    Hi Charlie,

    I live in Whitehall, NY, a little ways up the road from Glens Falls. I had
    Monday (MLK Day) off and was going to find out first hand how well my new
    D70 works in the cold, but I decided to stay indoors; it was too breezy to
    be out in the cold. =:-0

    I've had my F4s's out all day in the single digits with no troubles. I'm
    hoping the D70 can take it in stride too.

    Good shooting,
    Bob Scott
     
    Robert Scott, Jan 19, 2005
    #7
  8. Guest

    Guest

    Bigguy wrote:

    > Before you bring the (cold) camera into the (warm) house, seal it in

    a
    > plastic freezer bag. Allow it to warm up in the house and any

    condensation
    > will form on the outside of the bag not inside the camera...


    A camera is it's own bag. Putting it in another one won't accomplish
    much.
     
    , Jan 19, 2005
    #8
  9. Guest

    Larry Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > A camera is it's own bag. Putting it in another one won't accomplish
    > much
    >


    The bag prevents the (likely) much higher moisture content of the indoor air
    from permeating the camera, then condensing on the cold surfaces of the
    inside and outside parts of the camera.


    --
    Larry Lynch
    Mystic, Ct.
     
    Larry, Jan 19, 2005
    #9
  10. Guest

    Guest

    Larry wrote:

    >> A camera is it's own bag. Putting it in another one won't

    accomplish
    >> much

    >
    > The bag prevents the (likely) much higher moisture content of the

    indoor air
    > from permeating the camera, then condensing on the cold surfaces of

    the
    > inside and outside parts of the camera.


    Like I said: the camera is it's own bag. By the time anything wiggles
    through whatever cracks or holes in the camera body itself --
    condensation/frost may even help seal these to some degree -- the
    camera will most likely have warmed up.
     
    , Jan 19, 2005
    #10
  11. Guest

    Larry Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > Like I said: the camera is it's own bag. By the time anything wiggles
    > through whatever cracks or holes in the camera body itself --
    > condensation/frost may even help seal these to some degree -- the
    > camera will most likely have warmed up.
    >



    A plastic/metal object @ 5 deg F entering a room with a temperature of 65 deg
    F will NOT form frost, but will form an imediate coating of moisture. If the
    humidity in the room is above 60% (which it usually is in a dwelling) actuall
    puddles of water can and do form on a tabletop where the plastic/metal device
    has been placed.


    --
    Larry Lynch
    Mystic, Ct.
     
    Larry, Jan 20, 2005
    #11
  12. Guest

    Ken Weitzel Guest

    wrote:

    > Larry wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>A camera is it's own bag. Putting it in another one won't

    >
    > accomplish
    >
    >>>much

    >>
    >>The bag prevents the (likely) much higher moisture content of the

    >
    > indoor air
    >
    >>from permeating the camera, then condensing on the cold surfaces of

    >
    > the
    >
    >>inside and outside parts of the camera.

    >
    >
    > Like I said: the camera is it's own bag. By the time anything wiggles
    > through whatever cracks or holes in the camera body itself --
    > condensation/frost may even help seal these to some degree -- the
    > camera will most likely have warmed up.


    Hi...

    Surely you're not suggesting that the camera is
    anywhere even thinking about being airtight? :) :)

    Ken
     
    Ken Weitzel, Jan 20, 2005
    #12
  13. Guest

    Charlie Self Guest

    Robert Scott notes:

    >"Charlie Self" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> >

    >> IIRC, back in the good old days when I used a Canon F1, shooting
    >> motorcycle ice
    >> races around Glens Falls, NY,

    >
    >Hi Charlie,
    >
    >I live in Whitehall, NY, a little ways up the road from Glens Falls. I had
    >Monday (MLK Day) off and was going to find out first hand how well my new
    >D70 works in the cold, but I decided to stay indoors; it was too breezy to
    >be out in the cold. =:-0
    >
    >I've had my F4s's out all day in the single digits with no troubles. I'm
    >hoping the D70 can take it in stride too.


    Back in those days, I was a LOT younger, and I lived in Albany. I actually
    enjoyed that. We had a couple days of single digits here this week (Virginia)
    and I no longer like any part of it.

    Your D70 is probably going to be fine. As someone else noted, you may find
    batteries drop off more quickly, but AFAIK, single digit cold isn't going to do
    anything to circuitry and such. Your autofocus might be a problem. Use manual
    if it is.

    Charlie Self
    "One of the common denominators I have found is that expectations rise above
    that which is expected." George W. Bush
     
    Charlie Self, Jan 20, 2005
    #13
  14. Guest

    Larry Guest

    In article <>, says...
    > Thanks for all the responses....I think if it's colder then 32f out I'll
    > keep the unit indoors just to be on the safe side. Above 32, I'll bring it
    > outside. I certainly don't want to screw it up by bringing it from the cold
    > to the warm indoors. Imagine that...having condensation ruin a perfectly new
    > D70. Yikes!
    >


    I take my cameras out in the cold all the time (2 deg F 2 days ago) but I put
    them in a plastic pouch for a few minutes before I bring them indoors.

    In the time it takes to hang up my coat, and pour a cup of coffee they are
    "equalized" enough to come out an play.


    --
    Larry Lynch
    Mystic, Ct.
     
    Larry, Jan 20, 2005
    #14
  15. Guest

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Robert Scott wrote:
    > "Charlie Self" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>IIRC, back in the good old days when I used a Canon F1, shooting
    >>motorcycle ice
    >>races around Glens Falls, NY,

    >
    >
    > Hi Charlie,
    >
    > I live in Whitehall, NY, a little ways up the road from Glens Falls. I had
    > Monday (MLK Day) off and was going to find out first hand how well my new
    > D70 works in the cold, but I decided to stay indoors; it was too breezy to
    > be out in the cold. =:-0
    >
    > I've had my F4s's out all day in the single digits with no troubles. I'm
    > hoping the D70 can take it in stride too.
    >
    > Good shooting,
    > Bob Scott
    >
    >

    Generally, electronic devices work better in the cold, however, you
    might have to warm the batteries now and then. Also, protect moving
    parts from water...
     
    Ron Hunter, Jan 20, 2005
    #15
  16. Guest

    Ron Hunter Guest

    wrote:
    > Thanks for all the responses....I think if it's colder then 32f out I'll
    > keep the unit indoors just to be on the safe side. Above 32, I'll bring it
    > outside. I certainly don't want to screw it up by bringing it from the cold
    > to the warm indoors. Imagine that...having condensation ruin a perfectly new
    > D70. Yikes!
    >
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>I have this new D70 ready to shoot. It's FREEZING out there. Does cold
    >>weather affect the camera itself and is it harmful to it? I guess I should
    >>read the specifications about operating temp ranges. It's actually about 3
    >>degrees here with the wind chill. That may not be good for an expensive

    >
    > lens
    >
    >>or the internal components of the camera. Damn, I wanna take some

    >
    > pictures.
    >
    >>Spring time is usually the perfect time though....and that will be here
    >>eventually.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >

    You can get condensation at just about any temperature. Cold weather
    emphasizes the problem, but it can happen at comfortable temps also.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jan 20, 2005
    #16
  17. Guest

    Jim Townsend Guest

    Ron Hunter wrote:

    > You can get condensation at just about any temperature. Cold weather
    > emphasizes the problem, but it can happen at comfortable temps also.


    Yes.. I know that leaving an air conditioned car or building on a hot
    humid day can generate condensation. Sometimes more than moving
    a camera from single digit temperatures into a car or house.

    I've seen the whole instrument panel in my air conditioned car fog up
    almost instantly after opening the door on warm day when the humidity
    was up around 90%. The condensation was so heavy, I couldn't read the
    guages.. This was caused by a temperature change of about 8 degrees.
    (~72 in the car ~80 outside). Neither of these could be considered
    cold temperatures :)

    I'm curious. With the millions of digicams in use indoors and out, all
    over the world... Are there any actual documented cases of cameras being
    damaged by condensation ? If so, what exactly did the condensation do to
    these cameras ?
     
    Jim Townsend, Jan 20, 2005
    #17
  18. Guest

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Jim Townsend wrote:
    > Ron Hunter wrote:
    >
    >
    >>You can get condensation at just about any temperature. Cold weather
    >>emphasizes the problem, but it can happen at comfortable temps also.

    >
    >
    > Yes.. I know that leaving an air conditioned car or building on a hot
    > humid day can generate condensation. Sometimes more than moving
    > a camera from single digit temperatures into a car or house.
    >
    > I've seen the whole instrument panel in my air conditioned car fog up
    > almost instantly after opening the door on warm day when the humidity
    > was up around 90%. The condensation was so heavy, I couldn't read the
    > guages.. This was caused by a temperature change of about 8 degrees.
    > (~72 in the car ~80 outside). Neither of these could be considered
    > cold temperatures :)
    >
    > I'm curious. With the millions of digicams in use indoors and out, all
    > over the world... Are there any actual documented cases of cameras being
    > damaged by condensation ? If so, what exactly did the condensation do to
    > these cameras ?
    >
    >

    No damage to mine, but I do have a problem with fogged lens now and then.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jan 21, 2005
    #18
  19. Guest

    Clark Martin Guest

    In article <>, <>
    wrote:

    > I have this new D70 ready to shoot. It's FREEZING out there. Does cold
    > weather affect the camera itself and is it harmful to it? I guess I should
    > read the specifications about operating temp ranges. It's actually about 3
    > degrees here with the wind chill. That may not be good for an expensive lens
    > or the internal components of the camera. Damn, I wanna take some pictures.
    > Spring time is usually the perfect time though....and that will be here
    > eventually.


    Last year I was in Yosemite Valley on a day with the temperature
    dropping below 32F (rain turned to snow). I had been carrying my
    Olympus D-490 in a camera bag under my Jacket. I took it out and took
    one picture then went to close the lens cover / shut it off. The lens
    wouldn't retract. I put it back under my jacket and was eventually able
    to get it to retract. I don't know if it was the camera or the
    batteries. After that I either didn't take some shots or kept the
    camera under my jacket to open / close it and just pulled it out quickly
    for the shot.

    --
    Clark Martin
    Redwood City, CA, USA Macintosh / Internet Consulting

    "I'm a designated driver on the Information Super Highway"
     
    Clark Martin, Jan 22, 2005
    #19
  20. Guest

    Mike Fields Guest

    "Clark Martin" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>, <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > I have this new D70 ready to shoot. It's FREEZING out there. Does cold
    > > weather affect the camera itself and is it harmful to it? I guess I

    should
    > > read the specifications about operating temp ranges. It's actually about

    3
    > > degrees here with the wind chill. That may not be good for an expensive

    lens
    > > or the internal components of the camera. Damn, I wanna take some

    pictures.
    > > Spring time is usually the perfect time though....and that will be here
    > > eventually.

    >
    > Last year I was in Yosemite Valley on a day with the temperature
    > dropping below 32F (rain turned to snow). I had been carrying my
    > Olympus D-490 in a camera bag under my Jacket. I took it out and took
    > one picture then went to close the lens cover / shut it off. The lens
    > wouldn't retract. I put it back under my jacket and was eventually able
    > to get it to retract. I don't know if it was the camera or the
    > batteries. After that I either didn't take some shots or kept the
    > camera under my jacket to open / close it and just pulled it out quickly
    > for the shot.
    >
    > --
    > Clark Martin
    > Redwood City, CA, USA Macintosh / Internet Consulting
    >
    > "I'm a designated driver on the Information Super Highway"


    Not sure what the problem was, but there is no way the cold could
    have affected the batteries in the time you took it out, took a picture
    then when to close it back up. Those batteries have a fair amount
    of thermal mass and they are enclosed in the camera when the door
    is shut so it would take quite a while for them to change temperature
    based on the ambient temperature. I have a D-490 and have not seen
    any problems like that and have had it up on the ski slopes a couple
    of times (in my jacket before/after taking the pictures) with no
    problems.

    mikey
     
    Mike Fields, Jan 22, 2005
    #20
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