Cold Temperature ?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jonathan Sylvestre, Feb 7, 2006.

  1. I used my old Canon AE1 in temperature like -10°C (14°F) many times with no
    problems.

    IM now using a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT with a Canon EF 70-300mm IS USM.

    Is it a good idea to use my new kit at temperature like -10°C (14°F) or even
    colder, for few hours ???

    If there is no problems, do you have any praticals ideas to avoid problems
    when going back to 22°C (72°F) ??

    Thank you very much for your responses/ideas

    Jonathan
     
    Jonathan Sylvestre, Feb 7, 2006
    #1
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  2. Jonathan Sylvestre

    Steve Mackie Guest

    > Is it a good idea to use my new kit at temperature like -10°C (14°F) or
    > even colder, for few hours ???


    Canon says:

    Operating Temperature Range: 0 - 40°C / 32-104°F

    Steve
     
    Steve Mackie, Feb 7, 2006
    #2
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  3. Jonathan Sylvestre

    Eatmorepies Guest

    "Jonathan Sylvestre" <> wrote in message
    news:2H6Gf.16105$...
    >I used my old Canon AE1 in temperature like -10°C (14°F) many times with no
    >problems.
    >
    > IM now using a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT with a Canon EF 70-300mm IS
    > USM.
    >
    > Is it a good idea to use my new kit at temperature like -10°C (14°F) or
    > even colder, for few hours ???
    >


    I kept the battery warm by putting it in my trouser pocket when I took the
    camera out in the very cold (4 or more below zero counts as very cold with
    me) and using the camera for some time - I have no idea if that's necessary.
    I suspect (faintly) that the battery output may fall if it gets very cold.

    I supose I could buy a second battery to keep in my pocket to test my
    theory - but I find a fully charged battery lasts for hundreds of standard
    shots. On Sunday (2 degrees C and no pocket precaution) I took over 100 with
    my new IS lens with no hint of a lowbat signal.

    John
     
    Eatmorepies, Feb 7, 2006
    #3
  4. Jonathan Sylvestre

    Larry Lynch Guest

    In article <2H6Gf.16105$>,
    says...
    > I used my old Canon AE1 in temperature like -10°C (14°F) many times with no
    > problems.
    >
    > IM now using a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT with a Canon EF 70-300mm IS USM.
    >
    > Is it a good idea to use my new kit at temperature like -10°C (14°F) or even
    > colder, for few hours ???
    >
    > If there is no problems, do you have any praticals ideas to avoid problems
    > when going back to 22°C (72°F) ??
    >
    > Thank you very much for your responses/ideas
    >
    > Jonathan
    >
    >
    >


    I have used my Digital Rebel (300-D) at temperatures as low as 15
    degrees below zero (F) for short (20 minutes) sessions.

    The focus seems slow no matter which lens, and the battery life is
    almost nothing (if the battery is allowed to get that cold).

    In actual practice, I think you could expect 50 to 100 exposures from a
    freshly charged battery, and REMEMBER that the plastic parts of the
    camera/lens/attatchments will shatter almost without provocation at
    those low temps.

    Example:

    At - 15 degrees F, I dropped a lens hood from about 3 feet (waist high)
    onto pavement. It shattered explosively. (it had been in the car and
    was the same temp as the air.

    Larry Lynch
    Mystic, Ct.
     
    Larry Lynch, Feb 7, 2006
    #4
  5. Jonathan Sylvestre

    ASAAR Guest

    On Tue, 7 Feb 2006 14:38:39 -0500, Jonathan Sylvestre wrote:

    > Is it a good idea to use my new kit at temperature like -10°C (14°F) or even
    > colder, for few hours ???


    Probably not, as the camera isn't rated for that kind of service.
    But if it will operate at that temperature for extended periods,
    check to see if Canon or anyone else makes a handle for it that
    takes AA batteries. Some of Canon's other models take handles that
    accept either AA cells or several of their standard rechargeable
    Li-Ion batteries. The advantage is that if you can use lithium AA
    cells, they'll not only provide great battery life, but they're
    rated for operation in temperatures well below rechargeable Li-Ion
    batteries, down to 40 deg. below zero (both C & F).
     
    ASAAR, Feb 7, 2006
    #5
  6. "ASAAR" <> a écrit dans le message de news:
    ...
    > On Tue, 7 Feb 2006 14:38:39 -0500, Jonathan Sylvestre wrote:
    >
    >> Is it a good idea to use my new kit at temperature like -10°C (14°F) or
    >> even
    >> colder, for few hours ???

    >
    > Probably not, as the camera isn't rated for that kind of service.
    > But if it will operate at that temperature for extended periods,
    > check to see if Canon or anyone else makes a handle for it that
    > takes AA batteries. Some of Canon's other models take handles that
    > accept either AA cells or several of their standard rechargeable
    > Li-Ion batteries. The advantage is that if you can use lithium AA
    > cells, they'll not only provide great battery life, but they're
    > rated for operation in temperatures well below rechargeable Li-Ion
    > batteries, down to 40 deg. below zero (both C & F).
    >



    Yes, I have a battery grip and I can use AA batteries. So the batteries life
    is not anymore the problem ! Thank you !
     
    Jonathan Sylvestre, Feb 7, 2006
    #6
  7. "... and REMEMBER that the plastic parts of the
    camera/lens/attatchments will shatter almost without provocation at
    those low temps.

    Example:

    At - 15 degrees F, I dropped a lens hood from about 3 feet (waist high)
    onto pavement. It shattered explosively. (it had been in the car and
    was the same temp as the air.

    Larry Lynch
    Mystic, Ct."


    Do you think that de plastic part of the lens and camera will suffer of the
    response of material with temperature changes ? I mean, even if you don't
    touch it, will that kind of plastic break because of change in temparature ?

    Also, do you had problems with fog IN the lens or IN the camera body ??
     
    Jonathan Sylvestre, Feb 7, 2006
    #7
  8. "Steve Mackie" <> a écrit dans le message de
    news: Ga7Gf.26243$...
    >> Is it a good idea to use my new kit at temperature like -10°C (14°F) or
    >> even colder, for few hours ???

    >
    > Canon says:
    >
    > Operating Temperature Range: 0 - 40°C / 32-104°F
    >
    > Steve
    >


    Yeah I know... But what I would like to know is WHY ? and what will happend
    under 0°C... Maybe that will give me some ideas !

    Thank you
     
    Jonathan Sylvestre, Feb 7, 2006
    #8
  9. Jonathan Sylvestre

    ASAAR Guest

    On Tue, 7 Feb 2006 17:21:28 -0500, Jonathan Sylvestre wrote:

    > Yes, I have a battery grip and I can use AA batteries. So the batteries life
    > is not anymore the problem ! Thank you !


    You're welcome. The Energizer packages show the complete
    temperature range, -40 to +140 deg. F, which I think works out to
    -40 to + 60 deg. C, well beyond the camera's range on the high end,
    and well beyond mine too!
     
    ASAAR, Feb 7, 2006
    #9
  10. Jonathan Sylvestre

    Rutger Guest

    "Jonathan Sylvestre" <> schreef in bericht
    news:2H6Gf.16105$...
    >I used my old Canon AE1 in temperature like -10°C (14°F) many times with no
    >problems.
    >
    > IM now using a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT with a Canon EF 70-300mm IS
    > USM.
    >
    > Is it a good idea to use my new kit at temperature like -10°C (14°F) or
    > even colder, for few hours ???
    >
    > If there is no problems, do you have any praticals ideas to avoid problems
    > when going back to 22°C (72°F) ??
    >
    > Thank you very much for your responses/ideas
    >
    > Jonathan


    Do not expect any problems, but keep in mind that lenses perform best if the
    complete lens is at the same temp. Ie: when you have a rel. warm lens and
    start shooting in very cold environment the air inside the lens will whirl,
    as will the air inside the body.

    Rutger

    --
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/zwaarddrager/sets/
     
    Rutger, Feb 7, 2006
    #10
  11. Jonathan Sylvestre

    PanHandler Guest

    "Jonathan Sylvestre" <> wrote in message
    news:i99Gf.16958$...

    > Do you think that de plastic part of the lens and camera will suffer of
    > the response of material with temperature changes ? I mean, even if you
    > don't touch it, will that kind of plastic break because of change in
    > temparature ?
    > > Also, do you had problems with fog IN the lens or IN the camera body ??


    Seal the camera/lens in a zip-lok bag before entering a warm place.
    Otherwise it will sweat inside and out like a cold beer on a summer day.
     
    PanHandler, Feb 8, 2006
    #11
  12. Jonathan Sylvestre

    Larry Lynch Guest

    In article <i99Gf.16958$>,
    says...
    >
    >
    > Do you think that de plastic part of the lens and camera will suffer of the
    > response of material with temperature changes ? I mean, even if you don't
    > touch it, will that kind of plastic break because of change in temparature ?
    >
    > Also, do you had problems with fog IN the lens or IN the camera body ??
    >

    The temperature changes in the camera/lens are fairly safe, as long as
    they all happen at the same time. Things will expand and contract at
    close enough rates to prevent breakage.

    Choose your lens BEFORE going out in the cold.. Dont change lenses in
    the cold, thats too much of an oportunity for breakage.

    The important things are as follows:

    1. do not impact any of the plastic parts of the camera/lens while they
    are cold.

    2. When you are done using the camera in the cold, seal it up in a
    plastic bag BEFORE you take it indoors. The humidity at low temeratures
    is by nature VERY low, and you want to keep the camera in that low
    humidity until it is warm.

    3. wait a good lkong time before un-sealing the camera when you bring it
    inside. If you open up the camera bag before the camera warms up, the
    humidity in the warmer air will instantly turn into water droplets
    inside and outside the camera.

    Larry Lynch
    Mystic CT
     
    Larry Lynch, Feb 8, 2006
    #12
  13. Jonathan Sylvestre

    Steve Mackie Guest

    >>> Is it a good idea to use my new kit at temperature like -10°C (14°F) or
    >>> even colder, for few hours ???

    >>
    >> Canon says:
    >>
    >> Operating Temperature Range: 0 - 40°C / 32-104°F
    >>

    >
    > Yeah I know... But what I would like to know is WHY ? and what will
    > happend under 0°C... Maybe that will give me some ideas !


    I believe it's reason to void your warranty. ;)
     
    Steve Mackie, Feb 8, 2006
    #13
  14. Jonathan Sylvestre

    Charles Self Guest

    "Jonathan Sylvestre" <> wrote in message
    news:sb9Gf.16980$...
    >
    > "Steve Mackie" <> a écrit dans le message de
    > news: Ga7Gf.26243$...
    >>> Is it a good idea to use my new kit at temperature like -10°C (14°F) or
    >>> even colder, for few hours ???

    >>
    >> Canon says:
    >>
    >> Operating Temperature Range: 0 - 40°C / 32-104°F
    >>
    >> Steve
    >>

    >
    > Yeah I know... But what I would like to know is WHY ? and what will
    > happend under 0°C... Maybe that will give me some ideas !
    >


    Batteries will die fast. If your shutter is the type that has to be lubed,
    the lube will thicken up and throw off speeds.

    With film cameras, shutter lube and too rapid rewind speeds tended to come
    in right after condensation as a problem when shooting in very cold weather.
    I used to have my old Canon F1 "winter lubed" when I wanted to shoot
    motorcycle ice races, which sometimes took place in temps as low as minus 10
    F. Winter lubrication was/is nothing more than the removal of all lube.
    Obviously, the procedure needs to be reversed ASAP when back in warm
    shooting conditions.

    Oh. Yeah. Too rapid rewind created lightning like streaks on film, caused by
    static electricity.
     
    Charles Self, Feb 8, 2006
    #14
  15. "Jonathan Sylvestre" <> a écrit dans le message de
    news: 2H6Gf.16105$...
    >I used my old Canon AE1 in temperature like -10°C (14°F) many times with no
    >problems.
    >
    > IM now using a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT with a Canon EF 70-300mm IS
    > USM.
    >
    > Is it a good idea to use my new kit at temperature like -10°C (14°F) or
    > even colder, for few hours ???
    >
    > If there is no problems, do you have any praticals ideas to avoid problems
    > when going back to 22°C (72°F) ??
    >
    > Thank you very much for your responses/ideas
    >
    > Jonathan
    >


    Thank you all for your responses !
     
    Jonathan Sylvestre, Feb 8, 2006
    #15
  16. Jonathan Sylvestre

    wayne Guest

    And if it does all work fine for you, you may find you have less noise
    in the images than normal at the same ISO setting because of the
    reduction in thermal noise.

    Cheers,

    Wayne
    Wayne J. Cosshall
    Publisher, The Digital ImageMaker, http://www.dimagemaker.com/
    Assistant Director, International Digital Art Award
    Writer and educator in graphic design, photography, digital technology
    Personal art site http://www.artinyourface.com/
     
    wayne, Feb 8, 2006
    #16
  17. Jonathan Sylvestre

    scamper Guest

    Jonathan Sylvestre wrote:
    > I used my old Canon AE1 in temperature like -10°C (14°F) many times with no
    > problems.
    > IM now using a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT with a Canon EF 70-300mm IS USM.
    > Is it a good idea to use my new kit at temperature like -10°C (14°F) or even
    > colder, for few hours ???
    > If there is no problems, do you have any praticals ideas to avoid problems
    > when going back to 22°C (72°F) ??


    Jonathan,

    It's been about 25 years since I did a lot of winter photography.

    As I recall, I had good success with keeping my camera inside my
    slightly oversized parka. The camera would be at a nice warm temperature
    right up till I wanted to shoot, then I'd zip down, grab the camera and
    do a series of photos.

    To prevent condensation on the camera due to sweat from my exercising
    body, I kept it in a camera case, mostly. With a long telephoto, a lens
    cap can protect the front filter from condensation but the eyepiece fogs
    quickly.

    Extra lenses were kept in a couple of the parka's inside pockets.

    No exposure compensation was needed for the film with this method.
    Otherwise, with a cold film camera, you'd need to add the right amount
    of f-stops to compensate for the cold film. (I painfully remember
    taking five photographers to Belgium in the winter for Reforger and
    forgetting to tell them to add an f-stop to compensate for the 40 degree
    cold. Every frame/roll was one-stop under exposed till I caught on and
    push processed the rest of the film.)

    Ed
     
    scamper, Feb 9, 2006
    #17
  18. Jonathan Sylvestre

    Guest

    I just returned from Canada ski vacation a month ago (temperatures down
    to about +15 F) and Kazakhstan just now (temperatures down to 0 F) and
    did not have any problem using my camera (Canon Digital Elph, only a
    year old). In Kazakhstan the camera was relatively warm because it was
    brought directly from inside a building. In Canada, it was very
    definitely cold because it hung around my neck all day, skiing. No
    problems, except for fogging upon returning inside, which went away
    after 10-15 minutes of exposure to warm air of the room.
     
    , Feb 12, 2006
    #18
  19. Jonathan Sylvestre

    Rudy Benner Guest

    +15 F is not cold, that is balmy. -40 F is cold.

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I just returned from Canada ski vacation a month ago (temperatures down
    > to about +15 F) and Kazakhstan just now (temperatures down to 0 F) and
    > did not have any problem using my camera (Canon Digital Elph, only a
    > year old). In Kazakhstan the camera was relatively warm because it was
    > brought directly from inside a building. In Canada, it was very
    > definitely cold because it hung around my neck all day, skiing. No
    > problems, except for fogging upon returning inside, which went away
    > after 10-15 minutes of exposure to warm air of the room.
    >
     
    Rudy Benner, Feb 12, 2006
    #19
  20. "Rudy Benner" <> wrote:
    >+15 F is not cold, that is balmy. -40 F is cold.


    Only if the wind is blowing... ;-)

    ><> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>I just returned from Canada ski vacation a month ago (temperatures down
    >> to about +15 F) and Kazakhstan just now (temperatures down to 0 F) and
    >> did not have any problem using my camera (Canon Digital Elph, only a
    >> year old). In Kazakhstan the camera was relatively warm because it was
    >> brought directly from inside a building. In Canada, it was very
    >> definitely cold because it hung around my neck all day, skiing. No
    >> problems, except for fogging upon returning inside, which went away
    >> after 10-15 minutes of exposure to warm air of the room.
    >>


    --
    Floyd L. Davidson http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
     
    Floyd Davidson, Feb 12, 2006
    #20
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