Coaxial flash socket for external flash

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Chris, Jan 22, 2004.

  1. Chris

    Chris Guest

    I'm looking for a camera for indoor portraiture using an umbrella flash.
    The very old flash unit I have is a huge Bowens unit with the
    old-fashioned,
    traditional co-axial flash synch lead.

    What would be a suitable digital camera to use with this?
    Could I use the new Canon EOS - the plastic one?
    I couldn't understand from the spec what flash connections are possible.
    --
    Chris
    Chris, Jan 22, 2004
    #1
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  2. Chris

    Robertwgross Guest

    Chris wrote:
    >I'm looking for a camera for indoor portraiture using an umbrella flash.
    >The very old flash unit I have is a huge Bowens unit with the
    >old-fashioned,
    >traditional co-axial flash synch lead.
    >
    >What would be a suitable digital camera to use with this?
    >Could I use the new Canon EOS - the plastic one?
    >I couldn't understand from the spec what flash connections are possible.


    The Canon Digital Rebel does not have a PC connector, so this one is a bad
    choice.

    ---Bob Gross---
    Robertwgross, Jan 22, 2004
    #2
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  3. Chris wrote:
    > I'm looking for a camera for indoor portraiture using an umbrella flash.
    > The very old flash unit I have is a huge Bowens unit with the
    > old-fashioned,
    > traditional co-axial flash synch lead.
    >
    > What would be a suitable digital camera to use with this?
    > Could I use the new Canon EOS - the plastic one?
    > I couldn't understand from the spec what flash connections are possible.


    I think the Kodak DX6490 has one of those connections.

    It's a 4megapixel camera with 10x optical zoom (35mm equiv of 38-380mm). The
    lens starts at F2.8 (terminology?), and the camera has many manual settings
    except for manual focus. The auto focus is very good though.

    I can send you a photo taken with one if you like.

    --
    --
    Ben Thomas
    Melbourne, Australia
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?BenOne=A9?=, Jan 22, 2004
    #3
  4. "Robertwgross" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Chris wrote:
    > >I'm looking for a camera for indoor portraiture using an umbrella

    flash.
    > >The very old flash unit I have is a huge Bowens unit with the
    > >old-fashioned,
    > >traditional co-axial flash synch lead.
    > >
    > >What would be a suitable digital camera to use with this?
    > >Could I use the new Canon EOS - the plastic one?
    > >I couldn't understand from the spec what flash connections are

    possible.
    >
    > The Canon Digital Rebel does not have a PC connector, so this one is

    a bad
    > choice.


    Its trivial to get a standard hot show to PC converter. Go to any
    photo store.
    The Black Sheep, Jan 22, 2004
    #4
  5. Chris

    Robertwgross Guest

    The Black Sheep wrote:
    >Its trivial to get a standard hot show to PC converter. Go to any
    >photo store.


    Yes, but there is a potential problem, literally. Many studio flash units have
    a very high trigger voltage, and applying that almost directly to the hot shoe
    on a Canon Digital Rebel is likely to cause problems or burn it out altogether.

    ---Bob Gross---
    Robertwgross, Jan 22, 2004
    #5
  6. "Robertwgross" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The Black Sheep wrote:
    > >Its trivial to get a standard hot show to PC converter. Go to any
    > >photo store.

    >
    > Yes, but there is a potential problem, literally. Many studio flash

    units have
    > a very high trigger voltage, and applying that almost directly to

    the hot shoe
    > on a Canon Digital Rebel is likely to cause problems or burn it out

    altogether.

    That problem is as much a concern for a PC terminal as for the hot
    shoe- in many (most?) new SLRs, digital or otherwise, the PC terminal
    can only handle about 6v. I had the problem for years working in
    studios! The answer is simple and relatively cheap: I never used the
    PC terminal with unknown flash units, and always used a Wein SafeSync.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=245292&is=REG
    The Black Sheep, Jan 23, 2004
    #6
  7. Chris

    Robertwgross Guest

    The Black Sheep wrote:
    >That problem is as much a concern for a PC terminal as for the hot
    >shoe- in many (most?) new SLRs, digital or otherwise, the PC terminal
    >can only handle about 6v. I had the problem for years working in
    >studios! The answer is simple and relatively cheap: I never used the
    >PC terminal with unknown flash units, and always used a Wein SafeSync.
    >
    >
    >http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q

    =&sku=245292&is=REG

    Apparently not. The original poster was not asking about any new SLR, but
    rather the Digital Rebel. The hot shoe is the piece that is vulnerable to high
    voltage. Nor did you mention the Wein part to the original poster.

    ---Bob Gross---
    Robertwgross, Jan 23, 2004
    #7
  8. Chris

    Randy Guest

    I have just purchased the Fuji S2 Pro. It does use the old Std. Flash
    cable to make the connection. I looked at Kodaks and Nikon and both
    wanted us to use their dedicated flash units or an ugly Adaptor that
    sits in the on camera flash hot shoe. I don't know what other cameras
    do use the cable but the alternative is the adaptor. which might not
    be so bad with a radio slave plugged into the adaptor and a reciever on
    the Bowens if the voltage across the pc points is high on the Bowens light.

    Chris wrote:
    > I'm looking for a camera for indoor portraiture using an umbrella flash.
    > The very old flash unit I have is a huge Bowens unit with the
    > old-fashioned,
    > traditional co-axial flash synch lead.
    >
    > What would be a suitable digital camera to use with this?
    > Could I use the new Canon EOS - the plastic one?
    > I couldn't understand from the spec what flash connections are possible.
    Randy, Jan 23, 2004
    #8
  9. "Robertwgross" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The Black Sheep wrote:
    > >That problem is as much a concern for a PC terminal as for the hot
    > >shoe- in many (most?) new SLRs, digital or otherwise, the PC

    terminal
    > >can only handle about 6v. I had the problem for years working in
    > >studios! The answer is simple and relatively cheap: I never used

    the
    > >PC terminal with unknown flash units, and always used a Wein

    SafeSync.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=detai

    ls&Q
    > =&sku=245292&is=REG
    >
    > Apparently not. The original poster was not asking about any new

    SLR, but
    > rather the Digital Rebel.


    The Digital Rebel, which I have, *is* a new SLR.

    > The hot shoe is the piece that is vulnerable to high
    > voltage. Nor did you mention the Wein part to the original poster.


    I did not mention the Wein Safe Synch to the original poster, that is
    true. The hot shoe is NOT the only part that is vulnerable to high
    voltages. Getting a camera with a PC connector is not a guarantee
    that damage will not occur due to high synch voltages. As a case in
    point, my Minolta 600si SLR has a PC terminal and when I checked with
    Minolta Canada, several years ago, I was told not to use a synch
    voltage above 6v on either the PC terminal of the hot shoe.

    The original poster asked about a Bowens unit. I can't speak for his
    model, but the ones I worked with several years ago had a synch
    voltage below 6v, so that was not an issue.
    The Black Sheep, Jan 23, 2004
    #9
  10. Chris

    Pixmaker Guest

    On 22 Jan 2004 23:45:52 GMT, (Robertwgross) wrote:

    >The Black Sheep wrote:
    >>Its trivial to get a standard hot show to PC converter. Go to any
    >>photo store.

    >

    Snip

    Please...do yourself a huge favor and buy the Wien adapter to protect your camera. Repairing the camera will cost many
    times the price of the adapter. And the adapter can be used on any camera.

    Some cameras will work well with pretty high voltages. Nikon told me that trigger voltages up to 250 Volts were safe on
    my F-4s and many of the Nikon bodies. I still use the protective adapter!


    -- DaveinFLL
    ===========================
    "It's not the heat, it's the humidity."
    ===========================
    (Think the humidity's bad? You should watch us vote!)
    Pixmaker, Jan 23, 2004
    #10
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