Closed systems leave song buyers out in the cold

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by steve, Oct 16, 2006.

  1. steve

    steve Guest

    There you have it.

    Competing companies with proprietary offerings result in the consumer losing
    out.

    So the consumer by-passes the marketing-imposed bloackage.

    These companies pursue their interests...and consumers respond in kind.

    Predictable. Inevitable.

    http://www.usatoday.com/tech/products/2006-10-15-music-war_x.htm
    steve, Oct 16, 2006
    #1
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  2. steve

    GraB Guest

    On Mon, 16 Oct 2006 15:11:00 +1300, steve <>
    wrote:

    >There you have it.
    >
    >Competing companies with proprietary offerings result in the consumer losing
    >out.
    >
    >So the consumer by-passes the marketing-imposed bloackage.
    >
    >These companies pursue their interests...and consumers respond in kind.
    >
    >Predictable. Inevitable.
    >
    >http://www.usatoday.com/tech/products/2006-10-15-music-war_x.htm


    Yes, it makes you want to walk away from it all, doesn't it?

    A hifi shop manager told me that all these MP3 players have been bad
    in the sense that people don't know how the music is meant to sound.
    They only ever hear low bit-rate music on their cheap players and
    think that is it. I recently heard such playing through a pair of
    high quality speakers and it sounded awful, well below what the
    speakers were capable of.
    GraB, Oct 16, 2006
    #2
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  3. steve

    Craig Shore Guest

    On Mon, 16 Oct 2006 16:00:58 +1300, GraB <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 16 Oct 2006 15:11:00 +1300, steve <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>There you have it.
    >>
    >>Competing companies with proprietary offerings result in the consumer losing
    >>out.
    >>
    >>So the consumer by-passes the marketing-imposed bloackage.
    >>
    >>These companies pursue their interests...and consumers respond in kind.
    >>
    >>Predictable. Inevitable.
    >>
    >>http://www.usatoday.com/tech/products/2006-10-15-music-war_x.htm

    >
    >Yes, it makes you want to walk away from it all, doesn't it?
    >
    >A hifi shop manager told me that all these MP3 players have been bad
    >in the sense that people don't know how the music is meant to sound.
    >They only ever hear low bit-rate music on their cheap players and
    >think that is it.


    More likely most people just don't care what the sound quality is like.

    What they do care about is when they swap hardware due to a fault or upgrade
    that they no longer can play or own any of the music they have purchased.
    Craig Shore, Oct 16, 2006
    #3
  4. steve

    MarkH Guest

    GraB <> wrote in
    news::

    > On Mon, 16 Oct 2006 15:11:00 +1300, steve <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>There you have it.
    >>
    >>Competing companies with proprietary offerings result in the consumer
    >>losing out.
    >>
    >>So the consumer by-passes the marketing-imposed bloackage.
    >>
    >>These companies pursue their interests...and consumers respond in
    >>kind.
    >>
    >>Predictable. Inevitable.
    >>
    >>http://www.usatoday.com/tech/products/2006-10-15-music-war_x.htm

    >
    > Yes, it makes you want to walk away from it all, doesn't it?
    >
    > A hifi shop manager told me that all these MP3 players have been bad
    > in the sense that people don't know how the music is meant to sound.
    > They only ever hear low bit-rate music on their cheap players and
    > think that is it. I recently heard such playing through a pair of
    > high quality speakers and it sounded awful, well below what the
    > speakers were capable of.


    So how is this different from the previous situation where people listen to
    music on a $5.95 radio and don't know how the music is meant to sound? Or
    for that matter when people used tape players with dolby hiss reduction
    that meant that all the higher frequencies were lost.

    A while ago I tested the speakers built into my LCD monitor, I preferred
    the sound from my $600 computer speakers - especially when using the
    optical connection from my PC.

    El Cheapo equipment has always given poor results and quality equipment has
    always sounded so much better. Low bitrate music on cheap MP3 players is
    no worse than other forms of cheap music players.

    Generally I use 160k or better when playing music on my computer or from
    MP3 CDs in my car. I can't tell the difference between playing an audio CD
    and a good 192K MP3.


    --
    Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
    See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 27-May-06)
    "The person on the other side was a young woman. Very obviously a
    young woman. There was no possible way she could have been mistaken
    for a young man in any language, especially Braille."
    Maskerade
    MarkH, Oct 16, 2006
    #4
  5. In message <>, steve wrote:

    > There you have it.
    >
    > Competing companies with proprietary offerings result in the consumer
    > losing out.
    >
    > So the consumer by-passes the marketing-imposed bloackage.
    >
    > These companies pursue their interests...and consumers respond in kind.
    >
    > Predictable. Inevitable.
    >
    > http://www.usatoday.com/tech/products/2006-10-15-music-war_x.htm


    Online service eMusic sells DRM-free songs from independent labels. It
    has quietly become No. 2 to Apple in digital song sales with an 11%
    share.

    Yahoo, meanwhile, has experimented with two labels willing to try
    selling non-copy-protected songs online.

    Insteresting that e-Music single-handedly managed to surpass Microsoft's
    entire "Plays For Sure" campaign. Wonder if that suggests there is no room
    in the market for a second DRM-encumbered format, i.e. Zune?
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 16, 2006
    #5
  6. steve

    steve Guest

    GraB wrote:

    > A hifi shop manager told me that all these MP3 players have been bad
    > in the sense that people don't know how the music is meant to sound.
    > They only ever hear low bit-rate music on their cheap players and
    > think that is it. I recently heard such playing through a pair of
    > high quality speakers and it sounded awful, well below what the
    > speakers were capable of.


    I've seen a few examples of this, but where the song is on a CD of mine, I
    rip it at a higher bit rate and improve the quality (for use on my own
    compilation CDs - full of songs I have bought that I want to hear, in the
    order I want to hear them).
    steve, Oct 17, 2006
    #6
  7. steve

    steve Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > Insteresting that e-Music single-handedly managed to surpass Microsoft's
    > entire "Plays For Sure" campaign. Wonder if that suggests there is no room
    > in the market for a second DRM-encumbered format, i.e. Zune?


    I'm going to check out e-Music. Sounds like an idea worth supporting.
    steve, Oct 17, 2006
    #7
  8. In <> steve wrote:
    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> Insteresting that e-Music single-handedly managed to surpass
    >> Microsoft's entire "Plays For Sure" campaign. Wonder if that suggests
    >> there is no room in the market for a second DRM-encumbered format, i.
    >> e. Zune?

    >
    > I'm going to check out e-Music. Sounds like an idea worth supporting.


    They'd get a hell of a lot more customers, including myself, if they'd
    dump the daft monthly subscription and just sell individual tracks.

    --
    * Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand -> http://roger.geek.nz
    * PS/2 Mouse Adapter for vintage Apple II or Mac
    * SCART RGB cable for Apple IIGS
    Roger Johnstone, Oct 18, 2006
    #8
  9. steve

    steve Guest

    Roger Johnstone wrote:

    > In <> steve wrote:
    >> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>
    >>> Insteresting that e-Music single-handedly managed to surpass
    >>> Microsoft's entire "Plays For Sure" campaign. Wonder if that suggests
    >>> there is no room in the market for a second DRM-encumbered format, i.
    >>> e. Zune?

    >>
    >> I'm going to check out e-Music. Sounds like an idea worth supporting.

    >
    > They'd get a hell of a lot more customers, including myself, if they'd
    > dump the daft monthly subscription and just sell individual tracks.


    Aaahhh...

    I see.

    Ta.
    steve, Oct 18, 2006
    #9
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