Cloning Gone Bad

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Jeff Strickland, Jul 2, 2009.

  1. My wife has a 20G HDD that is filled, I have a 40G HDD that I use to boot so
    that I can attempt to recover data from other HDDs that are not happy with
    life. I don't need a 40G for the purposes I'm using mine for, I could do
    what I want with 20G and have loads of free space for all sorts of things.

    So, I want to clone my wife's HDD to mine, put mine in her machine so she
    has 40G of space -- she's already got external drives for storage, so she
    only needs space for programs to run.

    I attempted to clone or image or something, and the attempt failed.

    My process was to sit at my machine, set her machine as a shared drive, then
    clone it over my network to my 40G drive, then I installed the result of the
    40G drive into her machine and hoped it would boot. It did not.

    Today, I'm reading more on HDD cloning, and the thought occurs to me that I
    have to sit at her machine and initiate the copying (cloning) process,
    instead of initiate from a remote site over the network.

    Is this where I am going wrong? I found XXClone, which has a freeware
    version that I wanted to try, is it suitable for what I want to do?

    My goal is to remove the current HDD in my wife's machine and plug in a new
    drive, and not have to reinstall everything. Can I do this with HDDs that
    are different sizes?
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jul 2, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Jeff Strickland

    GGGG Guest

    Jeff,

    I'll not get into why not working ... to make it work, each of the disk
    makers has a utility: ( usually written by Ontrack for the disk maker,
    Seagate, Western Digital etc)
    http://www.ontrackdatarecovery.com/hard-drive-software/diskmanager.aspx
    Like this :
    http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/support/downloads/discwizard
    ( the TARGET drive company is the manufacturer utility you want to use)
    You put both drives in one box - boot the floppy/cd
    It will show a map of disks.
    It will see Destination ( make doesn't matter)
    and the TARGET disk ( make DOES matter)
    You then choose options - copy starts and when done you have a 40gb bootable
    disk with all the data from old drive.


    "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    news:h2ikc9$qu2$-september.org...
    > My wife has a 20G HDD that is filled, I have a 40G HDD that I use to boot
    > so that I can attempt to recover data from other HDDs that are not happy
    > with life. I don't need a 40G for the purposes I'm using mine for, I could
    > do what I want with 20G and have loads of free space for all sorts of
    > things.
    >
    > So, I want to clone my wife's HDD to mine, put mine in her machine so she
    > has 40G of space -- she's already got external drives for storage, so she
    > only needs space for programs to run.
    >
    > I attempted to clone or image or something, and the attempt failed.
    >
    > My process was to sit at my machine, set her machine as a shared drive,
    > then clone it over my network to my 40G drive, then I installed the result
    > of the 40G drive into her machine and hoped it would boot. It did not.
    >
    > Today, I'm reading more on HDD cloning, and the thought occurs to me that
    > I have to sit at her machine and initiate the copying (cloning) process,
    > instead of initiate from a remote site over the network.
    >
    > Is this where I am going wrong? I found XXClone, which has a freeware
    > version that I wanted to try, is it suitable for what I want to do?
    >
    > My goal is to remove the current HDD in my wife's machine and plug in a
    > new drive, and not have to reinstall everything. Can I do this with HDDs
    > that are different sizes?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    GGGG, Jul 2, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. "GGGG" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    news:h2it4n$8t0$-september.org...
    > Jeff,
    >
    > I'll not get into why not working ... to make it work, each of the disk
    > makers has a utility: ( usually written by Ontrack for the disk maker,
    > Seagate, Western Digital etc)
    > http://www.ontrackdatarecovery.com/hard-drive-software/diskmanager.aspx
    > Like this :
    > http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/support/downloads/discwizard
    > ( the TARGET drive company is the manufacturer utility you want to use)
    > You put both drives in one box - boot the floppy/cd
    > It will show a map of disks.
    > It will see Destination ( make doesn't matter)
    > and the TARGET disk ( make DOES matter)
    > You then choose options - copy starts and when done you have a 40gb
    > bootable disk with all the data from old drive.
    >
    >


    I'm not sure I have the CD/floppy for the original drive, so I will need to
    use some other package. The CD that I do have accomplished the task of
    moving files from one drive to the other, but the boot sector information --
    or some sort of OS file -- did not copy, and the 40G drive is not bootable.

    As I said earlier, I copied over my network instead of mounting both drives
    in the same machine and setting the destination drive as a slave. Is it
    possible that this is the source of my problems -- if I mount both drives in
    the same box and run the copy operation -- ghost or image -- from the
    current bootable drive, the result will be a larger drive that I can then
    set as the Master and use it from now on?






    > "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    > news:h2ikc9$qu2$-september.org...
    >> My wife has a 20G HDD that is filled, I have a 40G HDD that I use to boot
    >> so that I can attempt to recover data from other HDDs that are not happy
    >> with life. I don't need a 40G for the purposes I'm using mine for, I
    >> could do what I want with 20G and have loads of free space for all sorts
    >> of things.
    >>
    >> So, I want to clone my wife's HDD to mine, put mine in her machine so she
    >> has 40G of space -- she's already got external drives for storage, so she
    >> only needs space for programs to run.
    >>
    >> I attempted to clone or image or something, and the attempt failed.
    >>
    >> My process was to sit at my machine, set her machine as a shared drive,
    >> then clone it over my network to my 40G drive, then I installed the
    >> result of the 40G drive into her machine and hoped it would boot. It did
    >> not.
    >>
    >> Today, I'm reading more on HDD cloning, and the thought occurs to me that
    >> I have to sit at her machine and initiate the copying (cloning) process,
    >> instead of initiate from a remote site over the network.
    >>
    >> Is this where I am going wrong? I found XXClone, which has a freeware
    >> version that I wanted to try, is it suitable for what I want to do?
    >>
    >> My goal is to remove the current HDD in my wife's machine and plug in a
    >> new drive, and not have to reinstall everything. Can I do this with HDDs
    >> that are different sizes?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jul 2, 2009
    #3
  4. Jeff Strickland

    - Bobb - Guest

    comments inline

    "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    news:h2j6n8$sa4$-september.org...
    >> news:h2ikc9$qu2$-september.org...
    >>> I want to clone my wife's HDD
    >>> My goal is to remove the current HDD in my wife's machine and plug in a
    >>> 40G drive, and not have to reinstall everything. Can I do this with HDDs
    >>> that are different sizes?

    > "Bobb" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    > news:h2it4n$8t0$-september.org...
    >> Jeff,
    >>
    >> I'll not get into why not working ... to make it work, each of the disk
    >> makers has a utility: ( usually written by Ontrack for the disk maker,
    >> Seagate, Western Digital etc)
    >> http://www.ontrackdatarecovery.com/hard-drive-software/diskmanager.aspx
    >> Like this :
    >> http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/support/downloads/discwizard
    >> ( the TARGET drive company is the manufacturer utility you want to use)
    >> You put both drives in one box - make boot media from that app . Now boot
    >> THAT floppy/cd
    >> It will show a map of disks.
    >> It will see SOURCE ( make doesn't matter)
    >> and the Destination /TARGET disk ( make DOES matter)
    >> You then choose options - copy starts and when done you have a 40gb
    >> bootable disk with all the data from old drive.
    >>


    > I'm not sure I have the CD/floppy for the original drive, so I will need
    > to use some other package.

    Sorry, when I said :
    "You put both drives in one box - boot the floppy/cd", I meant the floppy
    or CD you create via the download.

    Example: your PC has a SEAGATE drive, click link
    http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/support/downloads/discwizard

    See "If you are upgrading and want to migrate your data from the old drive
    to the new drive we provide DiscWizard as an option..." click " Learn more"
    and you get this PDF

    http://www.seagate.com/support/discwizard/dw_ug.en.pdf
    page 16
    The Tools menu contains the following items:

    .. Create Bootable Media - runs the bootable media creation procedure

    .. Clone Disc - copies the data from one drive to another

    .. Add New Disc - partitions and formats a new drive as additional storage

    Running CLONE will take the 20gb info and put onto 40gb drive.
    ( Think of it - you just bought THIS drive and THIS company needs you to
    able to use it - so , they give you this program to migrate - but it's
    licensed only for THEIR disks)

    open YOUR PC ( or go to drive details)
    Look at the disk - who made it ?
    Go to THAT website and download that company's program to migrate.
    Now, put both drives in wife's PC.
    Boot floppy/CD ( made from THAT DOWNLOAD) on wife's PC - run app.

    > The CD that I do have accomplished the task of moving files from one drive
    > to the other, but the boot sector information -- or some sort of OS
    > file -- did not copy, and the 40G drive is not bootable.
    >

    WITH BOTH DRIVES in same PC run that disk and choose clone.

    > As I said earlier, I copied over my network instead of mounting both
    > drives in the same machine and setting the destination drive as a slave.
    > Is it possible that this is the source of my problems -- if I mount both
    > drives in the same box and run the copy operation -- ghost or image --
    > from the current bootable drive, the result will be a larger drive that I
    > can then set as the Master and use it from now on?


    With both PC's up and running , you're not gonna copy boot info.
     
    - Bobb -, Jul 3, 2009
    #4
  5. Re: Cloning Gone Bad -- NORTON GHOST

    Okay, I wenty out and bought Ghost14.0.

    I backed up the existing 20G drive - set a Restore Point - to a network
    location, and can set up future back ups to the same place. Easy stuff ...

    Do I follow that with the same process, but to the new 40G drive instead of
    the network, then simply boot to it?



    "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    news:h2ikc9$qu2$-september.org...
    > My wife has a 20G HDD that is filled, I have a 40G HDD that I use to boot
    > so that I can attempt to recover data from other HDDs that are not happy
    > with life. I don't need a 40G for the purposes I'm using mine for, I could
    > do what I want with 20G and have loads of free space for all sorts of
    > things.
    >
    > So, I want to clone my wife's HDD to mine, put mine in her machine so she
    > has 40G of space -- she's already got external drives for storage, so she
    > only needs space for programs to run.
    >
    > I attempted to clone or image or something, and the attempt failed.
    >
    > My process was to sit at my machine, set her machine as a shared drive,
    > then clone it over my network to my 40G drive, then I installed the result
    > of the 40G drive into her machine and hoped it would boot. It did not.
    >
    > Today, I'm reading more on HDD cloning, and the thought occurs to me that
    > I have to sit at her machine and initiate the copying (cloning) process,
    > instead of initiate from a remote site over the network.
    >
    > Is this where I am going wrong? I found XXClone, which has a freeware
    > version that I wanted to try, is it suitable for what I want to do?
    >
    > My goal is to remove the current HDD in my wife's machine and plug in a
    > new drive, and not have to reinstall everything. Can I do this with HDDs
    > that are different sizes?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jul 4, 2009
    #5
  6. Re: Cloning Gone Bad -- NORTON GHOST

    I backed up to a network location -- a work group, actually. I can't see the
    network wirelessly or with a CAT5 cable, so I can't restor to a blank HDD,
    booting from the Norton Ghost CD.

    I then backed up directly to the 40G drive, but I can't restore to the same
    drive that the back up is on.

    Now, I'm booting to the original drive, then restoring to the new drive. the
    Progress Bar is moving very slowly. It's been several minutes, and Ghost is
    still calculating the Remaining Time. There is one block filled on the
    progress bar, and the cursor blinks from time to time. I'm waiting ...

    I'm also going in to watch TV, and won't be back until later, tomorrow
    morning if TV is boring.





    "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    news:h2m9hc$qal$-september.org...
    > Okay, I wenty out and bought Ghost14.0.
    >
    > I backed up the existing 20G drive - set a Restore Point - to a network
    > location, and can set up future back ups to the same place. Easy stuff ...
    >
    > Do I follow that with the same process, but to the new 40G drive instead
    > of the network, then simply boot to it?
    >
    >
    >
    > "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    > news:h2ikc9$qu2$-september.org...
    >> My wife has a 20G HDD that is filled, I have a 40G HDD that I use to boot
    >> so that I can attempt to recover data from other HDDs that are not happy
    >> with life. I don't need a 40G for the purposes I'm using mine for, I
    >> could do what I want with 20G and have loads of free space for all sorts
    >> of things.
    >>
    >> So, I want to clone my wife's HDD to mine, put mine in her machine so she
    >> has 40G of space -- she's already got external drives for storage, so she
    >> only needs space for programs to run.
    >>
    >> I attempted to clone or image or something, and the attempt failed.
    >>
    >> My process was to sit at my machine, set her machine as a shared drive,
    >> then clone it over my network to my 40G drive, then I installed the
    >> result of the 40G drive into her machine and hoped it would boot. It did
    >> not.
    >>
    >> Today, I'm reading more on HDD cloning, and the thought occurs to me that
    >> I have to sit at her machine and initiate the copying (cloning) process,
    >> instead of initiate from a remote site over the network.
    >>
    >> Is this where I am going wrong? I found XXClone, which has a freeware
    >> version that I wanted to try, is it suitable for what I want to do?
    >>
    >> My goal is to remove the current HDD in my wife's machine and plug in a
    >> new drive, and not have to reinstall everything. Can I do this with HDDs
    >> that are different sizes?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jul 4, 2009
    #6
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    "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    news:h2ikc9$qu2$-september.org...
    > My wife has a 20G HDD that is filled, I have a 40G HDD that I use to boot
    > so that I can attempt to recover data from other HDDs that are not happy
    > with life. I don't need a 40G for the purposes I'm using mine for, I could
    > do what I want with 20G and have loads of free space for all sorts of
    > things.
    >
    > So, I want to clone my wife's HDD to mine, put mine in her machine so she
    > has 40G of space -- she's already got external drives for storage, so she
    > only needs space for programs to run.
    >
    > I attempted to clone or image or something, and the attempt failed.
    >
    > My process was to sit at my machine, set her machine as a shared drive,
    > then clone it over my network to my 40G drive, then I installed the result
    > of the 40G drive into her machine and hoped it would boot. It did not.
    >
    > Today, I'm reading more on HDD cloning, and the thought occurs to me that
    > I have to sit at her machine and initiate the copying (cloning) process,
    > instead of initiate from a remote site over the network.
    >
    > Is this where I am going wrong? I found XXClone, which has a freeware
    > version that I wanted to try, is it suitable for what I want to do?
    >
    > My goal is to remove the current HDD in my wife's machine and plug in a
    > new drive, and not have to reinstall everything. Can I do this with HDDs
    > that are different sizes?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Gemini-Aquarius7, Jul 4, 2009
    #7
  8. Re: Cloning Gone Bad _ UPDATE

    The 20G drive was formatted to FAT32, the 40G drive is NTFS.

    The 40G drive is reported as NTFS, but I have apparently f---ed up the
    Registry very badly and am now doing an entirely new install of XP Pro onto
    my 40G drive. XP Setup is saying the partition is FAT32.

    Did I error in Ghosting from a FAT32 environment onto an NTFS HDD?

    I Ghosted after I hosed the Registry instead of before, so the Recovered OS
    was hosed as a result. Crap!





    "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    news:h2ikc9$qu2$-september.org...
    > My wife has a 20G HDD that is filled, I have a 40G HDD that I use to boot
    > so that I can attempt to recover data from other HDDs that are not happy
    > with life. I don't need a 40G for the purposes I'm using mine for, I could
    > do what I want with 20G and have loads of free space for all sorts of
    > things.
    >
    > So, I want to clone my wife's HDD to mine, put mine in her machine so she
    > has 40G of space -- she's already got external drives for storage, so she
    > only needs space for programs to run.
    >
    > I attempted to clone or image or something, and the attempt failed.
    >
    > My process was to sit at my machine, set her machine as a shared drive,
    > then clone it over my network to my 40G drive, then I installed the result
    > of the 40G drive into her machine and hoped it would boot. It did not.
    >
    > Today, I'm reading more on HDD cloning, and the thought occurs to me that
    > I have to sit at her machine and initiate the copying (cloning) process,
    > instead of initiate from a remote site over the network.
    >
    > Is this where I am going wrong? I found XXClone, which has a freeware
    > version that I wanted to try, is it suitable for what I want to do?
    >
    > My goal is to remove the current HDD in my wife's machine and plug in a
    > new drive, and not have to reinstall everything. Can I do this with HDDs
    > that are different sizes?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jul 5, 2009
    #8
  9. Jeff Strickland

    Baron Guest

    Re: Cloning Gone Bad _ UPDATE

    Jeff Strickland wrote:

    > The 20G drive was formatted to FAT32, the 40G drive is NTFS.
    >
    > The 40G drive is reported as NTFS, but I have apparently f---ed up the
    > Registry very badly and am now doing an entirely new install of XP Pro
    > onto my 40G drive. XP Setup is saying the partition is FAT32.


    XP wont let you create a FAT32 partition greater than 32Gb.
    DOS 6.2 will let you create a FAT32 partition upto 138Gb.

    > Did I error in Ghosting from a FAT32 environment onto an NTFS HDD?


    Depending upon how you created the ghost image, the target will have the
    same format and size as the source.

    > I Ghosted after I hosed the Registry instead of before, so the
    > Recovered OS was hosed as a result. Crap!


    All I can offer is Commiserations ! Remember the mistakes you made and
    try not to repeat them.

    --
    Best Regards:
    Baron.
     
    Baron, Jul 5, 2009
    #9
  10. Jeff Strickland

    Baron Guest

    Re: Cloning Gone Bad _ UPDATE

    Jeff Strickland wrote:

    >
    > "Baron" <> wrote in message
    > news:h2qrmo$sbl$-september.org...
    >> Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >>
    >>> The 20G drive was formatted to FAT32, the 40G drive is NTFS.
    >>>
    >>> The 40G drive is reported as NTFS, but I have apparently f---ed up
    >>> the Registry very badly and am now doing an entirely new install of
    >>> XP Pro onto my 40G drive. XP Setup is saying the partition is FAT32.

    >>
    >> XP wont let you create a FAT32 partition greater than 32Gb.
    >> DOS 6.2 will let you create a FAT32 partition upto 138Gb.
    >>

    XP gave you the choice of leaving the existing FAT32 and using it or
    formatting it as NTFS. I was simply pointing out that you can have a
    FAT32 partition if you wanted by using DOS 6.2 to do it.


    > I did not create a FAT32 on the 40G drive, I created an NTFS.
    >
    >
    >>> Did I error in Ghosting from a FAT32 environment onto an NTFS HDD?

    >>
    >> Depending upon how you created the ghost image, the target will have
    >> the same format and size as the source.
    >>

    >
    > I don't know what that means.


    If you create a partition image of the existing drive (source) then the
    image when written to the new drive (target) will be the same size and
    format as the source.

    If you create a spindle image of the existing drive then the image when
    written to the new drive will be the same size and format as the
    existing drive (source).

    > I had an existing drive that was full or
    > corrupted -- I assumed full because it said so and I could not find
    > any crap that did not look like reasonably normal stuff. I'm willing
    > to live with Full, so I pulled out an old drive with more capacity so
    > Full would become Half Full.


    You would have had to either extend the partition or create a new
    partition in the remaining space.

    > It turns out, the XP install must have been corrupted because I have
    > XP Pro and Office '03 reloaded, and the space taken is less than 5G.
    >

    Unfortunately XP continuously records information and data about the
    machine usage and squirrels it away in all sorts of places, many that
    the user does not have common access to.

    This data can amount to many Gb. I've seen machines with more than 25Gb
    of stored data. Yes it can and does bring machines to their knees as
    you have discovered.

    I hope you backed up any data you didn't want to loose before you
    screwed the registry.

    >
    >>> I Ghosted after I hosed the Registry instead of before, so the
    >>> Recovered OS was hosed as a result. Crap!

    >>
    >> All I can offer is Commiserations ! Remember the mistakes you made
    >> and try not to repeat them.
    >>


    --
    Best Regards:
    Baron.
     
    Baron, Jul 5, 2009
    #10
  11. Jeff Strickland

    - Bobb - Guest

    Re: Cloning Gone Bad _ UPDATE

    Jeff,

    So all is well now ( after reinstall to the 40Gb disk) ?
    Did you find a migration app from disk drive vendor ? If I might ask, when
    you said:
    " Did I error in Ghosting from a FAT32 environment onto an NTFS HDD?"
    what program did you run to do that ?
    And now that it's all better, and data less than 10gb, I would reinstall the
    20gb drive and backup/copy from 40 to 20 as a spare drive. Maybe even go
    back to using the 20gb ??? Compare dates on the drives - which is newer /
    less time in use - use IT as primary.




    "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    news:h2qpc9$ag2$-september.org...
    > The 20G drive was formatted to FAT32, the 40G drive is NTFS.
    >
    > The 40G drive is reported as NTFS, but I have apparently f---ed up the
    > Registry very badly and am now doing an entirely new install of XP Pro
    > onto my 40G drive. XP Setup is saying the partition is FAT32.
    >
    > Did I error in Ghosting from a FAT32 environment onto an NTFS HDD?
    >
    > I Ghosted after I hosed the Registry instead of before, so the Recovered
    > OS was hosed as a result. Crap!
    >
    > "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    > news:h2ikc9$qu2$-september.org...
    >> My wife has a 20G HDD that is filled, I have a 40G HDD that I use to boot
    >> so that I can attempt to recover data from other HDDs that are not happy
    >> with life. I don't need a 40G for the purposes I'm using mine for, I
    >> could do what I want with 20G and have loads of free space for all sorts
    >> of things.
    >>
    >> So, I want to clone my wife's HDD to mine, put mine in her machine so she
    >> has 40G of space -- she's already got external drives for storage, so she
    >> only needs space for programs to run.
    >>
    >> I attempted to clone or image or something, and the attempt failed.
    >>
    >> My process was to sit at my machine, set her machine as a shared drive,
    >> then clone it over my network to my 40G drive, then I installed the
    >> result of the 40G drive into her machine and hoped it would boot. It did
    >> not.
    >>
    >> Today, I'm reading more on HDD cloning, and the thought occurs to me that
    >> I have to sit at her machine and initiate the copying (cloning) process,
    >> instead of initiate from a remote site over the network.
    >>
    >> Is this where I am going wrong? I found XXClone, which has a freeware
    >> version that I wanted to try, is it suitable for what I want to do?
    >>
    >> My goal is to remove the current HDD in my wife's machine and plug in a
    >> new drive, and not have to reinstall everything. Can I do this with HDDs
    >> that are different sizes?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    - Bobb -, Jul 7, 2009
    #11
  12. Re: Cloning Gone Bad _ UPDATE

    "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    news:h2ug95$lhv$-september.org...
    > Jeff,
    >
    > So all is well now ( after reinstall to the 40Gb disk) ?
    > Did you find a migration app from disk drive vendor ? If I might ask, when
    > you said:
    > " Did I error in Ghosting from a FAT32 environment onto an NTFS HDD?"
    > what program did you run to do that ?
    > And now that it's all better, and data less than 10gb, I would reinstall
    > the 20gb drive and backup/copy from 40 to 20 as a spare drive. Maybe even
    > go back to using the 20gb ??? Compare dates on the drives - which is newer
    > / less time in use - use IT as primary.
    >
    >
    >


    I had to do a clean install to the 40G drive. For now, the 20G drive is in
    place as a slave so my wife can recover any data that may be contained
    buried among the program files. (All programs do not store the data they
    generate in My Documents.) As my wife figures out which programs she
    actually wants, and reloads them, she can copy the data files from the old
    drive and drop them into the folder on the new drive, and continue whatever
    the program task is.

    I used Norton Ghost. It turns out, My disk utility probably would have done
    th etrick, and I did not need to buy Ghost. What happened when I used the
    disk utility, the resulting drive would not boot because there was a problem
    with NTLDR and NTDETECT.COM files. I had to fix this separately before I
    could proceed.

    When I restored the 20G files to the 40G drive, the formatting (reportedly)
    changed to FAT32. I specifically formatted the 40G to NTFS, but when I did
    the fresh install of XP, the Installer said the file system was FAT32. I'm a
    bit confused by this. I have to conclude that the FAT32 file structure of
    the 20G drive came over during the Recover operation in Ghost. I don't why I
    assume the file structure would be defined by the destination drive, but I
    did. I assumed the Target (source) drive file structure would go away during
    the recovery operation, and the Destination drive would govern the
    structure. I asked if I errored. The error I was asking about was restoring
    a FAT32 file system to an NTFS drive.

    My real problem was Ghosting a corrupted system, then restoring the
    corrupted data and hoping the corruption would be gone. Obviously, there is
    a flaw in the plan ;-) On the upside though, if I had screwed the Registry
    even more than it was, I had a Restore Point that while bad was not as bad
    as it could be.
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jul 7, 2009
    #12
  13. Jeff Strickland

    - Bobb - Guest

    Re: Cloning Gone Bad _ UPDATE

    I just saw your other reply ( they're not getting grouped for me here) I see
    you have Ghost14.0.
    Ghost Manual -
    ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/english_us_canada/products/ghost/14/manuals/ngh_14_user_guide.pdf
    Chapter 15 - page 171

    If source does not have Ghost on it, the best way to clone/backup is to
    install app on different PC and make standalone floppy. Then put both
    drives in one PC. Boot floppy and CLONE original.
    TO save backup to a CD/DVD or disk file, CREATE an IMAGE of original disk.
    Then burn to media.
    Later, RESTORE it (to bigger drive). If want as NTFS , once restored then
    CONVERT to NTFS.

    TO do it via Windows:
    http://www.brighthub.com/computing/windows-platform/reviews/774.aspx
    Choose COPY My HARD DRIVE
    ( second picture down - left column)

    With that package you should have also gotten Ghost 2003. THAT's what I use.
    I have 2 drives in box - one being a test drive. When I want to restore my
    test partition, I choose Start-programs- Ghost 2003 restore partititon and
    select my saved XPtest.img file. point to target partition - System shuts
    down reboots Ghost - Ghost restores my test image ( or 'disk' in your case)
    , then shuts down again and boots back to boot menu.
    I choose TEST drive' from my menu and all done - takes about 4 minutes for 6
    gb restore.

    http://service1.symantec.com/SUPPOR...2030415014425?OpenDocument&seg=hm&lg=en&ct=us





    "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    news:h2ug95$lhv$-september.org...
    > Jeff,
    >
    > So all is well now ( after reinstall to the 40Gb disk) ?
    > Did you find a migration app from disk drive vendor ? If I might ask, when
    > you said:
    > " Did I error in Ghosting from a FAT32 environment onto an NTFS HDD?"
    > what program did you run to do that ?
    > And now that it's all better, and data less than 10gb, I would reinstall
    > the 20gb drive and backup/copy from 40 to 20 as a spare drive. Maybe even
    > go back to using the 20gb ??? Compare dates on the drives - which is newer
    > / less time in use - use IT as primary.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    > news:h2qpc9$ag2$-september.org...
    >> The 20G drive was formatted to FAT32, the 40G drive is NTFS.
    >>
    >> The 40G drive is reported as NTFS, but I have apparently f---ed up the
    >> Registry very badly and am now doing an entirely new install of XP Pro
    >> onto my 40G drive. XP Setup is saying the partition is FAT32.
    >>
    >> Did I error in Ghosting from a FAT32 environment onto an NTFS HDD?
    >>
    >> I Ghosted after I hosed the Registry instead of before, so the Recovered
    >> OS was hosed as a result. Crap!
    >>
    >> "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    >> news:h2ikc9$qu2$-september.org...
    >>> My wife has a 20G HDD that is filled, I have a 40G HDD that I use to
    >>> boot so that I can attempt to recover data from other HDDs that are not
    >>> happy with life. I don't need a 40G for the purposes I'm using mine for,
    >>> I could do what I want with 20G and have loads of free space for all
    >>> sorts of things.
    >>>
    >>> So, I want to clone my wife's HDD to mine, put mine in her machine so
    >>> she has 40G of space -- she's already got external drives for storage,
    >>> so she only needs space for programs to run.
    >>>
    >>> I attempted to clone or image or something, and the attempt failed.
    >>>
    >>> My process was to sit at my machine, set her machine as a shared drive,
    >>> then clone it over my network to my 40G drive, then I installed the
    >>> result of the 40G drive into her machine and hoped it would boot. It did
    >>> not.
    >>>
    >>> Today, I'm reading more on HDD cloning, and the thought occurs to me
    >>> that I have to sit at her machine and initiate the copying (cloning)
    >>> process, instead of initiate from a remote site over the network.
    >>>
    >>> Is this where I am going wrong? I found XXClone, which has a freeware
    >>> version that I wanted to try, is it suitable for what I want to do?
    >>>
    >>> My goal is to remove the current HDD in my wife's machine and plug in a
    >>> new drive, and not have to reinstall everything. Can I do this with HDDs
    >>> that are different sizes?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    - Bobb -, Jul 7, 2009
    #13
  14. Jeff Strickland

    - Bobb - Guest

    Re: Cloning Gone Bad _ UPDATE

    "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    news:h2ui6a$vfq$-september.org...
    <<snipped>>
    >
    > When I restored the 20G files to the 40G drive, the formatting
    > (reportedly) changed to FAT32. I specifically formatted the 40G to NTFS,
    > but when I did the fresh install of XP, the Installer said the file system
    > was FAT32. I'm a bit confused by this. I have to conclude that the FAT32
    > file structure of the 20G drive came over during the Recover operation in
    > Ghost.


    did you run from Windows?
    choose "COPY MY DRIVE " ?
    That would copy everything - including disk structure
    To backup/restore the data, backup the partition to an image file then
    restore. If you then want NTFS - use CONVERT command once new drive working
    as FAT32.

    I'd do install, get everything up to date ( service packs etc) then backup
    partition to an image file. NOW you have a copy to restore should it blow up
    in future. Once done with all apps , then do it again ( and purge original
    ?) - or maybe put both on DVD for safekeeping.
     
    - Bobb -, Jul 7, 2009
    #14
  15. Re: Cloning Gone Bad _ UPDATE

    "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    news:h2ujge$6na$-september.org...
    >I just saw your other reply ( they're not getting grouped for me here) I
    >see you have Ghost14.0.
    > Ghost Manual -
    > ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/english_us_canada/products/ghost/14/manuals/ngh_14_user_guide.pdf
    > Chapter 15 - page 171
    >
    > If source does not have Ghost on it, the best way to clone/backup is to
    > install app on different PC and make standalone floppy. Then put both
    > drives in one PC. Boot floppy and CLONE original.
    > TO save backup to a CD/DVD or disk file, CREATE an IMAGE of original disk.
    > Then burn to media.
    > Later, RESTORE it (to bigger drive). If want as NTFS , once restored then
    > CONVERT to NTFS.
    >
    > TO do it via Windows:
    > http://www.brighthub.com/computing/windows-platform/reviews/774.aspx
    > Choose COPY My HARD DRIVE
    > ( second picture down - left column)
    >
    > With that package you should have also gotten Ghost 2003. THAT's what I
    > use. I have 2 drives in box - one being a test drive. When I want to
    > restore my test partition, I choose Start-programs- Ghost 2003 restore
    > partititon and select my saved XPtest.img file. point to target
    > partition - System shuts down reboots Ghost - Ghost restores my test image
    > ( or 'disk' in your case) , then shuts down again and boots back to boot
    > menu.
    > I choose TEST drive' from my menu and all done - takes about 4 minutes for
    > 6 gb restore.
    >
    > http://service1.symantec.com/SUPPOR...2030415014425?OpenDocument&seg=hm&lg=en&ct=us
    >
    >
    >


    I tried to put both drives in the same box, then backup the 20G directly to
    the 40G, then shut down, set the 40G as the Master, boot from the CD and
    restore. The problem became that Restore is not allowed to the same drive
    that the image is stored on. I can make the image from C:\ to D:\, but when
    I set D as the Master (making it C), the restore does not allow restoring
    C:\ to C:\, and I want to keep the original C until I'm certain that my Main
    Squeeze has what she needs.

    The only thing I did not try was to backup C to D, then restore C from D
    because that would keep the same 20G drive that I am trying to move away
    from.

    Since I was forced to do a fresh install of Windows anyhow, I am now
    wondering why I stayed stuck on the 40G drive because I could have moved to
    a 640G drive for fifty bucks. Oh well ... I now have a good install and a
    good backup, so I can put in a bigger drive pretty easily if my wife tells
    me to.
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jul 7, 2009
    #15
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