Cleaned your computer lately!

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by PseUDO, Dec 29, 2003.

  1. PseUDO

    PseUDO Guest

    PseUDO, Dec 29, 2003
    #1
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  2. PseUDO

    John Guest

    John, Dec 29, 2003
    #2
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  3. PseUDO

    steve Guest

    steve, Dec 29, 2003
    #3
  4. PseUDO

    ~misfit~ Guest

    PseUDO wrote:
    > http://www.neowin.net/forum/index.php?showtopic=127056&st=0
    >
    > Whats that burning smell!
    >
    > PseUDO


    I picked up a PC from the Refuse Transfer Station that was worse than that.
    It was a Celly 600, the HDD, RAM and CD-ROM had been removed but the case
    was chokka with dust and the heatsink was even dirtier than the one in the
    pic. The fan no longer turned and it had compressed the dust between the
    fins so tightly that it looked like concrete, no space left at all. I
    cleaned it up and it runs sweet now, even the fan, overclocked to 900MHz. I
    usually use a paint-brush to clean heatsinks but I had to chisel the crap
    out of that one with a screwdriver.

    (I later discovered it had belonged to the local doctor, it kept crashing
    (suprise, suprise) so he called in a company who told them they'd tested it
    and it was 'worn out' and he'd need a new one. They gutted it and put it in
    the rubbish outside his office. I bet they charged him an arm and a leg <g>)
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, Dec 29, 2003
    #4
  5. On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 20:33:39 +1300, steve wrote:

    > I no longer put PCs on the floor. Even if it is only 30cms off the floor
    > on a box, that's better than sitting right on the floor.


    No matter how high you put it, DO NOT put it under a desk.

    The act of moving your legs under the desk stirs up dust - carpet or no
    carpet.

    PCs under desks are invariably _filthy_ inside.

    PCs used by smokers are worse. I've seen 3-4mm coatings of nicotine dust
    inside such machines...
    Uncle StoatWarbler, Dec 29, 2003
    #5
  6. On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 21:55:04 +1300, ~misfit~ wrote:

    > I
    > usually use a paint-brush to clean heatsinks but I had to chisel the crap
    > out of that one with a screwdriver.


    Vaccuum cleaner, crevice nozzle.

    Works wonders.... (Don't use a bustbuster, they're not powerful enough)
    Uncle StoatWarbler, Dec 29, 2003
    #6
  7. PseUDO

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Uncle StoatWarbler wrote:
    > On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 21:55:04 +1300, ~misfit~ wrote:
    >
    >> I
    >> usually use a paint-brush to clean heatsinks but I had to chisel the
    >> crap out of that one with a screwdriver.

    >
    > Vaccuum cleaner, crevice nozzle.
    >
    > Works wonders.... (Don't use a bustbuster, they're not powerful
    > enough)


    Seriously, a vacuum cleaner wouldn't have touched that one. The fan had been
    physically compressing the dust in there for a while, hence the reference to
    concrete.
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, Dec 29, 2003
    #7
  8. PseUDO

    Brendan Guest

    On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 14:45:34 +1300, PseUDO wrote:

    > http://www.neowin.net/forum/index.php?showtopic=127056&st=0
    >
    > Whats that burning smell!
    >
    > PseUDO


    "Spybot S&D has blocked the download of TargetNet"..

    E.g. everyone should check for some spyware on their machines esp. if you
    viewed the above page.

    Aside from that no problems ;)

    BTW: install spybot search and destroy, and remember to use it's immunize
    and spy blocker facilities. The above spybot got past proximitron AND IE's
    security zone.


    --

    .... Brendan

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    The complete lack of evidence is the surest sign
    that the conspiracy is working.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Note: All comments are copyright 2003, and are opinion only where not
    otherwise stated, and always 'to the best of my reccollection'.
    Brendan, Dec 30, 2003
    #8
  9. PseUDO

    pete Guest

    "~misfit~" <~misfit~@his_desk.com> wrote in message
    news:cX1Ib.43999$...
    > Uncle StoatWarbler wrote:
    > > On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 21:55:04 +1300, ~misfit~ wrote:
    > >
    > >> I
    > >> usually use a paint-brush to clean heatsinks but I had to chisel the
    > >> crap out of that one with a screwdriver.

    > >
    > > Vaccuum cleaner, crevice nozzle.
    > >
    > > Works wonders.... (Don't use a bustbuster, they're not powerful
    > > enough)

    >
    > Seriously, a vacuum cleaner wouldn't have touched that one. The fan had

    been
    > physically compressing the dust in there for a while, hence the reference

    to
    > concrete.
    > --
    > ~misfit~


    wait till you've serviced PCs that have been used in a freight warehouse -
    the crap that forms from diesel smoke, rubber tyre dust (forklifts) etc will
    see your nicotine and raise it about 100. Frighteneing thing is the people
    who work there breathe this shit too, all day and every day.
    Or, the best of the lot that I saw was in a detergent chemical bulk store on
    the Wellington wharves. The fault logged was that the diskette drive didn't
    work - took the cover off (Compaq Deskpro SFF) and the motherboard was
    completely covered in dust up to the level of the CPU fan (P4).
    pete, Dec 30, 2003
    #9
  10. PseUDO

    PseUDO Guest

    "Brendan" <corum.usenet@myrealbox....com> wrote in message
    news:h05r2w01g7cg.1f1bj300afgqk$...
    > On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 14:45:34 +1300, PseUDO wrote:
    >
    > > http://www.neowin.net/forum/index.php?showtopic=127056&st=0
    > >
    > > Whats that burning smell!
    > >
    > > PseUDO

    >
    > "Spybot S&D has blocked the download of TargetNet"..
    >
    > E.g. everyone should check for some spyware on their machines esp. if you
    > viewed the above page.
    >
    > Aside from that no problems ;)
    >
    > BTW: install spybot search and destroy, and remember to use it's immunize
    > and spy blocker facilities. The above spybot got past proximitron AND IE's
    > security zone.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > ... Brendan

    I go to Neowin everyday ,along with millions of others, never had
    "TargetNet", installed, just ran spybot and it shows nothing, sure it's not
    a false positive??

    PseUDO
    PseUDO, Dec 30, 2003
    #10
  11. PseUDO

    E. Guest

    Uncle StoatWarbler wrote:

    > On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 21:55:04 +1300, ~misfit~ wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I
    >>usually use a paint-brush to clean heatsinks but I had to chisel the crap
    >>out of that one with a screwdriver.

    >
    >
    > Vaccuum cleaner, crevice nozzle.
    >
    > Works wonders.... (Don't use a bustbuster, they're not powerful enough)


    I use (works) air compressor. Best way to get rid of it - just ensure
    you squirt the first drops on your hand as for some reason they always
    seem to build up moisture.

    But that PC wasn't even close to being dirty (by PC standards). I am
    surprised people commented at all.
    E.
    E., Dec 30, 2003
    #11
  12. PseUDO

    pete Guest

    "E." <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Uncle StoatWarbler wrote:
    >
    > > On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 21:55:04 +1300, ~misfit~ wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>I
    > >>usually use a paint-brush to clean heatsinks but I had to chisel the

    crap
    > >>out of that one with a screwdriver.

    > >
    > >
    > > Vaccuum cleaner, crevice nozzle.
    > >
    > > Works wonders.... (Don't use a bustbuster, they're not powerful enough)

    >
    > I use (works) air compressor. Best way to get rid of it - just ensure
    > you squirt the first drops on your hand as for some reason they always
    > seem to build up moisture.


    A compressor should have a water trap. And NEVER direct compressed air at
    your skin - it is lethal.
    (In spite of the numerous people who will post saying how they have blown
    dust off their skin for years,
    Yahoo finds about 38,000 hits on "compressed air injuries")
    pete, Dec 30, 2003
    #12
  13. On Tue, 30 Dec 2003 06:39:01 +0000, E. wrote:

    >> Vaccuum cleaner, crevice nozzle.
    >>
    >> Works wonders.... (Don't use a bustbuster, they're not powerful enough)

    >
    > I use (works) air compressor. Best way to get rid of it


    For values of "get rid of it" approaching "blowing noxious crap all round the
    room"

    Attacking a dust buildup problem like that invariably rams dust into
    crevices where you don't want it getting.
    Uncle StoatWarbler, Dec 30, 2003
    #13
  14. PseUDO

    E. Guest

    pete wrote:
    > "E." <> wrote in message
    > news:...


    >>I use (works) air compressor. Best way to get rid of it - just ensure
    >>you squirt the first drops on your hand as for some reason they always
    >>seem to build up moisture.

    >
    >
    > A compressor should have a water trap. And NEVER direct compressed air at
    > your skin - it is lethal.
    > (In spite of the numerous people who will post saying how they have blown
    > dust off their skin for years,
    > Yahoo finds about 38,000 hits on "compressed air injuries")


    Interesting. I never knew that. Some of the injuries detailed are pretty
    obvious (compressed air in the anus can cause colon ruptures, ear/eye
    particle damage) but the embolism one seems the most probable.

    couldn't find anything stating what pressure is required to cause an
    embolism tho.

    Funnily enough, in all the places i have worked that use compressed air
    *none* have ever mentioned (or probably knew about) dangers relating to
    compressed air. There probably won't be anything on the issue until
    someone gets sued.....

    E.
    E., Dec 30, 2003
    #14
  15. PseUDO

    ~misfit~ Guest

    E. wrote:
    > Funnily enough, in all the places i have worked that use compressed
    > air *none* have ever mentioned (or probably knew about) dangers
    > relating to compressed air. There probably won't be anything on the
    > issue until someone gets sued.....


    I worked in two different places, quite a few years ago, where air
    compressors were used and was warned at both places about the dangers.
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, Dec 30, 2003
    #15
  16. PseUDO

    E. Guest

    Uncle StoatWarbler wrote:
    > On Tue, 30 Dec 2003 06:39:01 +0000, E. wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>Vaccuum cleaner, crevice nozzle.
    >>>
    >>>Works wonders.... (Don't use a bustbuster, they're not powerful enough)

    >>
    >>I use (works) air compressor. Best way to get rid of it

    >
    >
    > For values of "get rid of it" approaching "blowing noxious crap all round the
    > room"


    Unless you pick the PC up and take it outside. The thought of doing it
    inside is so stupid I didn't even consider that anyone would....

    >
    > Attacking a dust buildup problem like that invariably rams dust into
    > crevices where you don't want it getting.


    That has never happened in my experience. Its sounds like the sort of
    'reason' some of the dodgier PC retailers would use to avoid honouring
    warranties.
    E.
    E., Dec 31, 2003
    #16
  17. On Wed, 31 Dec 2003 04:22:42 +0000, E. wrote:

    >> Attacking a dust buildup problem like that invariably rams dust into
    >> crevices where you don't want it getting.

    >
    > That has never happened in my experience. Its sounds like the sort of
    > 'reason' some of the dodgier PC retailers would use to avoid honouring
    > warranties.


    I used to service _large_ radio transmitters. Standard practice was
    cleaning out the things with air, which invariably resulted in dust
    finding its way into switchgear contacts, etc.

    On the computing side of things I've watched people use cans of air on
    dusty computers only to get dust into the PCI/ISA/Memory slots,
    necessitating through cleans of those.

    Nicotine dust in particular is sticky and greasy, making it quite hard to
    clean off without resorting to soapy water and a toothbrush, followed by
    isopropanol. You do NOT want it getting onto low voltage electrical
    contacts, whether they're "self cleaning" or not. That moniker does not
    guarantee that the contacts will be reliable through a greasy surface,
    Uncle StoatWarbler, Dec 31, 2003
    #17
  18. PseUDO

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Uncle StoatWarbler wrote:
    >
    > Nicotine dust in particular is sticky and greasy, making it quite
    > hard to clean off without resorting to soapy water and a toothbrush,
    > followed by isopropanol. You do NOT want it getting onto low voltage
    > electrical contacts, whether they're "self cleaning" or not. That
    > moniker does not guarantee that the contacts will be reliable through
    > a greasy surface,


    <Pet peeve>

    It's not nicotine dust, as at least four people here have called it in the
    last week. It's smoke. You could call the deposit tar or smoke residue but
    it sure as hell ain't nicotine dust. The concentration of nicotine in
    tobacco smoke is miniscule, especially after it's been exhaled.

    Now, back to your normal programming, Windows/Telecom bashing or playing
    with woger.
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, Dec 31, 2003
    #18
  19. PseUDO

    E. Guest

    Uncle StoatWarbler wrote:
    > On Wed, 31 Dec 2003 04:22:42 +0000, E. wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>Attacking a dust buildup problem like that invariably rams dust into
    >>>crevices where you don't want it getting.

    >>
    >>That has never happened in my experience. Its sounds like the sort of
    >>'reason' some of the dodgier PC retailers would use to avoid honouring
    >>warranties.

    >
    >
    > I used to service _large_ radio transmitters. Standard practice was
    > cleaning out the things with air, which invariably resulted in dust
    > finding its way into switchgear contacts, etc.


    Not too many of those on a standard motherboard.
    >
    > On the computing side of things I've watched people use cans of air on
    > dusty computers only to get dust into the PCI/ISA/Memory slots,
    > necessitating through cleans of those.


    Unless of course you happen to use something with a higher PSI than
    canned air... like an air compressor?

    > Nicotine dust in particular is sticky and greasy, making it quite hard to
    > clean off without resorting to soapy water and a toothbrush, followed by
    > isopropanol. You do NOT want it getting onto low voltage electrical
    > contacts, whether they're "self cleaning" or not. That moniker does not
    > guarantee that the contacts will be reliable through a greasy surface,


    You mean canned air is insufficient to remove grease? Amazing. And all
    those mechanics degreasing engine blocks with it....
    E.
    E., Jan 1, 2004
    #19
  20. PseUDO

    pete Guest

    "E." <> wrote in message
    news:3ff3de16$...
    > Uncle StoatWarbler wrote:
    > > On Wed, 31 Dec 2003 04:22:42 +0000, E. wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>>Attacking a dust buildup problem like that invariably rams dust into
    > >>>crevices where you don't want it getting.
    > >>
    > >>That has never happened in my experience. Its sounds like the sort of
    > >>'reason' some of the dodgier PC retailers would use to avoid honouring
    > >>warranties.

    > >
    > >
    > > I used to service _large_ radio transmitters. Standard practice was
    > > cleaning out the things with air, which invariably resulted in dust
    > > finding its way into switchgear contacts, etc.

    >
    > Not too many of those on a standard motherboard.
    > >
    > > On the computing side of things I've watched people use cans of air on
    > > dusty computers only to get dust into the PCI/ISA/Memory slots,
    > > necessitating through cleans of those.

    >
    > Unless of course you happen to use something with a higher PSI than
    > canned air... like an air compressor?
    >
    > > Nicotine dust in particular is sticky and greasy, making it quite hard

    to
    > > clean off without resorting to soapy water and a toothbrush, followed by
    > > isopropanol. You do NOT want it getting onto low voltage electrical
    > > contacts, whether they're "self cleaning" or not. That moniker does not
    > > guarantee that the contacts will be reliable through a greasy surface,

    >
    > You mean canned air is insufficient to remove grease? Amazing. And all
    > those mechanics degreasing engine blocks with it....


    Nooo, the mechanics are using a degreasing solvent that from an aerosol can.
    Best way to use this stuff is to spray on a warm engine, and hose off with
    water after letting it soak for 5 - 10 minutes
    Air on its own would never move the crud of an engine block
    (there was no smiley so I assume your post wasn't tongue-in-cheek)
    pete, Jan 1, 2004
    #20
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