Cisco Stackwise

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Prashant, Feb 25, 2005.

  1. Prashant

    Prashant Guest

    Hi,
    Does anyone know the details of Cisco Stackwise Technology?
    I have the following questions. I read in the cisco website about it in
    which it states that 2 or more switches are combined to logically
    appear as one switch and hence could be managed using single IP
    Address. How does the snmp agent function in this case? How will the
    interface indices of the second switch look like ?
    When the master switch fails and when the other switch takes over as
    master will the interfaces indices of the switch change?

    thanks and regards,
    Prashant
    Prashant, Feb 25, 2005
    #1
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  2. Prashant

    thrill5 Guest

    The ports on the first switch would be FastEthernet 0/0/0 thu Fa 0/0/48, the
    second switch they are Fa 1/0/0 thru Fa 1/0/48.

    The switches act as a single entity, there is only one mangement interface,
    while in reality you have two or more switches, from a management point of
    view there is only one device. If the management device fails, the
    interface indices remain the same. It works exactly as if you had a 6500
    with redundant processors. In this case you have as many redundant
    processors as you have switches.

    Scott

    "Prashant" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    > Does anyone know the details of Cisco Stackwise Technology?
    > I have the following questions. I read in the cisco website about it in
    > which it states that 2 or more switches are combined to logically
    > appear as one switch and hence could be managed using single IP
    > Address. How does the snmp agent function in this case? How will the
    > interface indices of the second switch look like ?
    > When the master switch fails and when the other switch takes over as
    > master will the interfaces indices of the switch change?
    >
    > thanks and regards,
    > Prashant
    >
    thrill5, Feb 27, 2005
    #2
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  3. Prashant

    Prashant Guest

    Hi,
    thanks for the reply.
    I wanted to know what will happen if the master switch fails, say for
    example if the master switch was having interfaces 0/0/0 and the second
    switch 1/0/0 and perhaps the interfaces indices will be decided then .
    But if this master switch fails and the second switch becomes the new
    master will its interfaces remain as 1/0/0 and also the interface snmp
    indices remain the same as it was before the master switch failed?

    I dont understand what you mean by management device. I am not
    concerned about the management station failing.

    thanks and regards,
    Prashant
    Prashant, Feb 27, 2005
    #3
  4. Prashant

    thrill5 Guest

    The mangement device is the switch processor. The switch is managed and
    configured by the processor (it manages the functions of the switch, it
    provides the CLI, SNMP, routing, ARP times, CAM aging, etc.) When the
    master processor fails, management of the device moves to another processor
    in the stack and everything remains exactly as it was before the master
    processor failed.

    Scott
    "Prashant" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    > thanks for the reply.
    > I wanted to know what will happen if the master switch fails, say for
    > example if the master switch was having interfaces 0/0/0 and the second
    > switch 1/0/0 and perhaps the interfaces indices will be decided then .
    > But if this master switch fails and the second switch becomes the new
    > master will its interfaces remain as 1/0/0 and also the interface snmp
    > indices remain the same as it was before the master switch failed?
    >
    > I dont understand what you mean by management device. I am not
    > concerned about the management station failing.
    >
    > thanks and regards,
    > Prashant
    >
    thrill5, Feb 28, 2005
    #4
  5. Prashant

    Ben Guest

    thrill5 wrote:
    > The mangement device is the switch processor. The switch is managed and
    > configured by the processor (it manages the functions of the switch, it
    > provides the CLI, SNMP, routing, ARP times, CAM aging, etc.) When the
    > master processor fails, management of the device moves to another processor
    > in the stack and everything remains exactly as it was before the master
    > processor failed.
    >
    > Scott
    > "Prashant" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>Hi,
    >>thanks for the reply.
    >>I wanted to know what will happen if the master switch fails, say for
    >>example if the master switch was having interfaces 0/0/0 and the second
    >>switch 1/0/0 and perhaps the interfaces indices will be decided then .
    >>But if this master switch fails and the second switch becomes the new
    >>master will its interfaces remain as 1/0/0 and also the interface snmp
    >>indices remain the same as it was before the master switch failed?
    >>
    >>I dont understand what you mean by management device. I am not
    >>concerned about the management station failing.
    >>
    >>thanks and regards,
    >>Prashant
    >>

    >
    >
    >

    As possible all the indexes will change, they normally do with a reboot
    but you may be able to use ifindex-persist option to get around this.
    Ben, Mar 2, 2005
    #5
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