Cisco 2600 - Cannot use console port

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Donald Zelenak Jr., Nov 17, 2003.

  1. I have a Cisco 2610 here that I cannot console into. If I set my terminal to
    9600, N, 8, 1, No Flow Control I can follow the normal bootup sequence, but
    I can't give it any keyboard input (i.e. "Press RETURN to get started!,
    pressing return does nothing.). About the only thing that it will recognize
    is a Ctrl-Break, which throws me into rommon 1>, but I can't type anything
    in there either. All keyboard input is "ignored".

    I set my TFTP server up and made a basic config file that gives the Ethernet
    an address, sets a VTY password and I can get into the router via Telnet. I
    can do anything via Telnet, and it's fast, leading me to believe that the
    router's CPU is not busy doing other stuff besides handling my console
    input. I set Scheduler Allocate 3000 1000 but that didn't help any at all.

    Hooking into the Aux port gives me nothing as well.

    I upgraded IOS from 12.0 to 12.2(19a), and it's just the basic IP only
    image. The router has 32MB of RAM and 8MB of flash.

    I can't figure this out for the life of me and I've been at it all day. I've
    never seen anything like this. I thought originally it might be that the
    Console port communications settings were changed, but I tried various
    combinations of port speeds and the only time I get anything out of it is
    when I use 9600. I've tried two console cables, and two computers. All the
    pins on the Console port on the router look straight, as I thought one might
    be bent and not making contact. I've reseated the RAM and the Flash, still
    no dice.

    Even though I can configure the router from a Telnet session, it bothers me
    that the console port does not work. If I ever had to get into it via the
    console, I'd be screwed.

    Any ideas? I searched the Cisco website for console port hangs and I didn't
    get much useful information from their troubleshooter.

    Thanks,
    Don
     
    Donald Zelenak Jr., Nov 17, 2003
    #1
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  2. "Donald Zelenak Jr." <> wrote:

    >I have a Cisco 2610 here that I cannot console into. If I set my terminal to
    >9600, N, 8, 1, No Flow Control I can follow the normal bootup sequence, but
    >I can't give it any keyboard input (i.e. "Press RETURN to get started!,
    >pressing return does nothing.). About the only thing that it will recognize
    >is a Ctrl-Break, which throws me into rommon 1>, but I can't type anything
    >in there either. All keyboard input is "ignored".


    The console port is probably fried. Frequently achieved by plugging an
    ISDN line into it. New 2600es come with a sticker over the console
    port saying "don't connect to ISDN", but once that's gone ...

    --
    Tilman Schmidt E-Mail:
    Bonn, Germany
    - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice.
    In practice, there is.
     
    Tilman Schmidt, Nov 17, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Don,
    The console port may be partially fried.

    Oddly enough, I have a 2501 that operates in exactly the same manner you
    describe; everything you said matches including the cntl-break sequence that
    works. Playing around with it over time, I found that if I inserted a null
    modem/no handshake adapter at one end of the connection, I could get the
    console port on mine to respond to keystrokes and act normally, but not
    otherwise when connected to a PC.

    Interestingly, though my 2501 is the only 2500 series in my fleet that has a
    console port that acts like this, but when plugged into a terminal server
    (516-CS in this case), it acts like any other console connection without the
    need of the null modem/no handshake adapter. With the term server the
    direct rolled (flat) cable connection works fine when using reverse telnet.

    I'd also be interested to know if anyone has insight into this problem.
    Robert

    "Donald Zelenak Jr." <> wrote in message
    news:x%bub.175599$ao4.582563@attbi_s51...
    > I have a Cisco 2610 here that I cannot console into. If I set my terminal

    to
    > 9600, N, 8, 1, No Flow Control I can follow the normal bootup sequence,

    but
    > I can't give it any keyboard input (i.e. "Press RETURN to get started!,
    > pressing return does nothing.). About the only thing that it will

    recognize
    > is a Ctrl-Break, which throws me into rommon 1>, but I can't type anything
    > in there either. All keyboard input is "ignored".
    >
    > I set my TFTP server up and made a basic config file that gives the

    Ethernet
    > an address, sets a VTY password and I can get into the router via Telnet.

    I
    > can do anything via Telnet, and it's fast, leading me to believe that the
    > router's CPU is not busy doing other stuff besides handling my console
    > input. I set Scheduler Allocate 3000 1000 but that didn't help any at all.
    >
    > Hooking into the Aux port gives me nothing as well.
    >
    > I upgraded IOS from 12.0 to 12.2(19a), and it's just the basic IP only
    > image. The router has 32MB of RAM and 8MB of flash.
    >
    > I can't figure this out for the life of me and I've been at it all day.

    I've
    > never seen anything like this. I thought originally it might be that the
    > Console port communications settings were changed, but I tried various
    > combinations of port speeds and the only time I get anything out of it is
    > when I use 9600. I've tried two console cables, and two computers. All the
    > pins on the Console port on the router look straight, as I thought one

    might
    > be bent and not making contact. I've reseated the RAM and the Flash, still
    > no dice.
    >
    > Even though I can configure the router from a Telnet session, it bothers

    me
    > that the console port does not work. If I ever had to get into it via the
    > console, I'd be screwed.
    >
    > Any ideas? I searched the Cisco website for console port hangs and I

    didn't
    > get much useful information from their troubleshooter.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Don
    >
    >
     
    Bob by The Bay, Nov 18, 2003
    #3
  4. Donald Zelenak Jr.

    Chris O Guest

    Sounds as though when the terminal end raises its RTS signal it is not
    seeing CTS back.
    On the console port interface this would be the signal on pin 1 of the RJ45
    (pin 8 at the other end of the rollover cable). If you have a breakout box
    try looping RTS to CTS back at the terminal/PC end and break the connection
    between console RJ45 pin 1 and CTS at the terminal end.
    Using certain null modem cables would achieve this as they include this loop
    at both ends.
    I guess the ctl-break sequence transmits regardless of the state of the
    interface control signals

    Chris O
    ___________________________________________________________________________


    "Bob by The Bay" <> wrote in message
    news:O3eub.171062$mZ5.1206354@attbi_s54...
    > Don,
    > The console port may be partially fried.
    >
    > Oddly enough, I have a 2501 that operates in exactly the same manner you
    > describe; everything you said matches including the cntl-break sequence

    that
    > works. Playing around with it over time, I found that if I inserted a

    null
    > modem/no handshake adapter at one end of the connection, I could get the
    > console port on mine to respond to keystrokes and act normally, but not
    > otherwise when connected to a PC.
    >
    > Interestingly, though my 2501 is the only 2500 series in my fleet that has

    a
    > console port that acts like this, but when plugged into a terminal server
    > (516-CS in this case), it acts like any other console connection without

    the
    > need of the null modem/no handshake adapter. With the term server the
    > direct rolled (flat) cable connection works fine when using reverse

    telnet.
    >
    > I'd also be interested to know if anyone has insight into this problem.
    > Robert
    >
    > "Donald Zelenak Jr." <> wrote in message
    > news:x%bub.175599$ao4.582563@attbi_s51...
    > > I have a Cisco 2610 here that I cannot console into. If I set my

    terminal
    > to
    > > 9600, N, 8, 1, No Flow Control I can follow the normal bootup sequence,

    > but
    > > I can't give it any keyboard input (i.e. "Press RETURN to get started!,
    > > pressing return does nothing.). About the only thing that it will

    > recognize
    > > is a Ctrl-Break, which throws me into rommon 1>, but I can't type

    anything
    > > in there either. All keyboard input is "ignored".
    > >
    > > I set my TFTP server up and made a basic config file that gives the

    > Ethernet
    > > an address, sets a VTY password and I can get into the router via

    Telnet.
    > I
    > > can do anything via Telnet, and it's fast, leading me to believe that

    the
    > > router's CPU is not busy doing other stuff besides handling my console
    > > input. I set Scheduler Allocate 3000 1000 but that didn't help any at

    all.
    > >
    > > Hooking into the Aux port gives me nothing as well.
    > >
    > > I upgraded IOS from 12.0 to 12.2(19a), and it's just the basic IP only
    > > image. The router has 32MB of RAM and 8MB of flash.
    > >
    > > I can't figure this out for the life of me and I've been at it all day.

    > I've
    > > never seen anything like this. I thought originally it might be that the
    > > Console port communications settings were changed, but I tried various
    > > combinations of port speeds and the only time I get anything out of it

    is
    > > when I use 9600. I've tried two console cables, and two computers. All

    the
    > > pins on the Console port on the router look straight, as I thought one

    > might
    > > be bent and not making contact. I've reseated the RAM and the Flash,

    still
    > > no dice.
    > >
    > > Even though I can configure the router from a Telnet session, it bothers

    > me
    > > that the console port does not work. If I ever had to get into it via

    the
    > > console, I'd be screwed.
    > >
    > > Any ideas? I searched the Cisco website for console port hangs and I

    > didn't
    > > get much useful information from their troubleshooter.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > > Don
    > >
    > >

    >
    >



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    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
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    Chris O, Nov 18, 2003
    #4
  5. Thanks Chris, that's very insightful. Let's see, what did I do with my
    break-out box... I'll have to try that.

    Bob


    "Chris O" <> wrote in message
    news:bpclm7$ee0$...
    > Sounds as though when the terminal end raises its RTS signal it is not
    > seeing CTS back.
    > On the console port interface this would be the signal on pin 1 of the

    RJ45
    > (pin 8 at the other end of the rollover cable). If you have a breakout box
    > try looping RTS to CTS back at the terminal/PC end and break the

    connection
    > between console RJ45 pin 1 and CTS at the terminal end.
    > Using certain null modem cables would achieve this as they include this

    loop
    > at both ends.
    > I guess the ctl-break sequence transmits regardless of the state of the
    > interface control signals
    >
    > Chris O
    >

    ___________________________________________________________________________
    >
    >
    > "Bob by The Bay" <> wrote in message
    > news:O3eub.171062$mZ5.1206354@attbi_s54...
    > > Don,
    > > The console port may be partially fried.
    > >
    > > Oddly enough, I have a 2501 that operates in exactly the same manner you
    > > describe; everything you said matches including the cntl-break sequence

    > that
    > > works. Playing around with it over time, I found that if I inserted a

    > null
    > > modem/no handshake adapter at one end of the connection, I could get the
    > > console port on mine to respond to keystrokes and act normally, but not
    > > otherwise when connected to a PC.
    > >
    > > Interestingly, though my 2501 is the only 2500 series in my fleet that

    has
    > a
    > > console port that acts like this, but when plugged into a terminal

    server
    > > (516-CS in this case), it acts like any other console connection without

    > the
    > > need of the null modem/no handshake adapter. With the term server the
    > > direct rolled (flat) cable connection works fine when using reverse

    > telnet.
    > >
    > > I'd also be interested to know if anyone has insight into this problem.
    > > Robert
    > >
    > > "Donald Zelenak Jr." <> wrote in message
    > > news:x%bub.175599$ao4.582563@attbi_s51...
    > > > I have a Cisco 2610 here that I cannot console into. If I set my

    > terminal
    > > to
    > > > 9600, N, 8, 1, No Flow Control I can follow the normal bootup

    sequence,
    > > but
    > > > I can't give it any keyboard input (i.e. "Press RETURN to get

    started!,
    > > > pressing return does nothing.). About the only thing that it will

    > > recognize
    > > > is a Ctrl-Break, which throws me into rommon 1>, but I can't type

    > anything
    > > > in there either. All keyboard input is "ignored".
    > > >
    > > > I set my TFTP server up and made a basic config file that gives the

    > > Ethernet
    > > > an address, sets a VTY password and I can get into the router via

    > Telnet.
    > > I
    > > > can do anything via Telnet, and it's fast, leading me to believe that

    > the
    > > > router's CPU is not busy doing other stuff besides handling my console
    > > > input. I set Scheduler Allocate 3000 1000 but that didn't help any at

    > all.
    > > >
    > > > Hooking into the Aux port gives me nothing as well.
    > > >
    > > > I upgraded IOS from 12.0 to 12.2(19a), and it's just the basic IP only
    > > > image. The router has 32MB of RAM and 8MB of flash.
    > > >
    > > > I can't figure this out for the life of me and I've been at it all

    day.
    > > I've
    > > > never seen anything like this. I thought originally it might be that

    the
    > > > Console port communications settings were changed, but I tried various
    > > > combinations of port speeds and the only time I get anything out of it

    > is
    > > > when I use 9600. I've tried two console cables, and two computers. All

    > the
    > > > pins on the Console port on the router look straight, as I thought one

    > > might
    > > > be bent and not making contact. I've reseated the RAM and the Flash,

    > still
    > > > no dice.
    > > >
    > > > Even though I can configure the router from a Telnet session, it

    bothers
    > > me
    > > > that the console port does not work. If I ever had to get into it via

    > the
    > > > console, I'd be screwed.
    > > >
    > > > Any ideas? I searched the Cisco website for console port hangs and I

    > > didn't
    > > > get much useful information from their troubleshooter.
    > > >
    > > > Thanks,
    > > > Don
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    > ---
    > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > Version: 6.0.541 / Virus Database: 335 - Release Date: 14/11/2003
    >
    >
     
    Bob by The Bay, Nov 18, 2003
    #5
  6. Donald Zelenak Jr.

    Andre Beck Guest

    "Chris O" <> writes:
    >
    > Sounds as though when the terminal end raises its RTS signal it is not
    > seeing CTS back.


    Then again, that would require the terminal to have hardware flow control
    configured. The original poster said 9600/8N1/No Flow Control and so far
    I assume he meant it (of course there is software *and* hardware flow
    control to switch off).

    > I guess the ctl-break sequence transmits regardless of the state of the
    > interface control signals


    This probably generates a genuine BREAK on the line, which for sure is
    independend of any flow control (intentionally). BREAK is defined as
    a long continuous stream of 0-Bits on the async line, with long beeing
    something between 0.25s and 0.5s. The interesting question is, how can
    a receiver break to not beeing able to receive normal async data, but
    still sense the presence of a BREAK? I would assume it's fried using
    some telco voltage (POTS ring voltage or just ISDN), but it's fried in
    a strange way...

    --
    The _S_anta _C_laus _O_peration
    or "how to turn a complete illusion into a neverending money source"

    -> Andre "ABPSoft" Beck +++ ABP-RIPE +++ Dresden, Germany, Spacetime <-
     
    Andre Beck, Nov 19, 2003
    #6
  7. Ok.. Check this out..

    I created a config for the 2600, TFTP'ed it into the router, and took the
    router over to our new building.

    I mistakenly typed in FastEthernet0/0 instead of Ethernet0/0. I thought I
    was screwed, as the Ethernet interface was now shutdown and I would not be
    able to console into it. It had also stopped trying to TFTP a config file at
    startup (No "service config" was in the config file..)

    I'm watching it load up on the console, and low and behold, the Console
    worked! It's the craziest thing I've ever seen.

    I'm not going to argue with it if it just now decided to work. The only
    thing I can think of is maybe some type of grounding issue in our old
    building. (<- Confused)

    - Don


    "Bob by The Bay" <> wrote in message
    news:O3eub.171062$mZ5.1206354@attbi_s54...
    > Don,
    > The console port may be partially fried.
    >
    > Oddly enough, I have a 2501 that operates in exactly the same manner you
    > describe; everything you said matches including the cntl-break sequence

    that
    > works. Playing around with it over time, I found that if I inserted a

    null
    > modem/no handshake adapter at one end of the connection, I could get the
    > console port on mine to respond to keystrokes and act normally, but not
    > otherwise when connected to a PC.
    >
    > Interestingly, though my 2501 is the only 2500 series in my fleet that has

    a
    > console port that acts like this, but when plugged into a terminal server
    > (516-CS in this case), it acts like any other console connection without

    the
    > need of the null modem/no handshake adapter. With the term server the
    > direct rolled (flat) cable connection works fine when using reverse

    telnet.
    >
    > I'd also be interested to know if anyone has insight into this problem.
    > Robert
    >
    > "Donald Zelenak Jr." <> wrote in message
    > news:x%bub.175599$ao4.582563@attbi_s51...
    > > I have a Cisco 2610 here that I cannot console into. If I set my

    terminal
    > to
    > > 9600, N, 8, 1, No Flow Control I can follow the normal bootup sequence,

    > but
    > > I can't give it any keyboard input (i.e. "Press RETURN to get started!,
    > > pressing return does nothing.). About the only thing that it will

    > recognize
    > > is a Ctrl-Break, which throws me into rommon 1>, but I can't type

    anything
    > > in there either. All keyboard input is "ignored".
    > >
    > > I set my TFTP server up and made a basic config file that gives the

    > Ethernet
    > > an address, sets a VTY password and I can get into the router via

    Telnet.
    > I
    > > can do anything via Telnet, and it's fast, leading me to believe that

    the
    > > router's CPU is not busy doing other stuff besides handling my console
    > > input. I set Scheduler Allocate 3000 1000 but that didn't help any at

    all.
    > >
    > > Hooking into the Aux port gives me nothing as well.
    > >
    > > I upgraded IOS from 12.0 to 12.2(19a), and it's just the basic IP only
    > > image. The router has 32MB of RAM and 8MB of flash.
    > >
    > > I can't figure this out for the life of me and I've been at it all day.

    > I've
    > > never seen anything like this. I thought originally it might be that the
    > > Console port communications settings were changed, but I tried various
    > > combinations of port speeds and the only time I get anything out of it

    is
    > > when I use 9600. I've tried two console cables, and two computers. All

    the
    > > pins on the Console port on the router look straight, as I thought one

    > might
    > > be bent and not making contact. I've reseated the RAM and the Flash,

    still
    > > no dice.
    > >
    > > Even though I can configure the router from a Telnet session, it bothers

    > me
    > > that the console port does not work. If I ever had to get into it via

    the
    > > console, I'd be screwed.
    > >
    > > Any ideas? I searched the Cisco website for console port hangs and I

    > didn't
    > > get much useful information from their troubleshooter.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > > Don
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Donald Zelenak Jr., Nov 20, 2003
    #7
  8. I appreciate the analysis as it is an area I don't have much knowledge
    about. In my case I tended to leave hardware flow control on rather than
    specify none, so that fits in my case.
    It's strange that it works normally when connected to a Cisco term server in
    my case. I'm not sure what to make of that.

    Bob


    "Andre Beck" <> wrote in message news:...
    > "Chris O" <> writes:
    > >
    > > Sounds as though when the terminal end raises its RTS signal it is not
    > > seeing CTS back.

    >
    > Then again, that would require the terminal to have hardware flow control
    > configured. The original poster said 9600/8N1/No Flow Control and so far
    > I assume he meant it (of course there is software *and* hardware flow
    > control to switch off).
    >
    > > I guess the ctl-break sequence transmits regardless of the state of the
    > > interface control signals

    >
    > This probably generates a genuine BREAK on the line, which for sure is
    > independend of any flow control (intentionally). BREAK is defined as
    > a long continuous stream of 0-Bits on the async line, with long beeing
    > something between 0.25s and 0.5s. The interesting question is, how can
    > a receiver break to not beeing able to receive normal async data, but
    > still sense the presence of a BREAK? I would assume it's fried using
    > some telco voltage (POTS ring voltage or just ISDN), but it's fried in
    > a strange way...
    >
    > --
    > The _S_anta _C_laus _O_peration
    > or "how to turn a complete illusion into a neverending money source"
    >
    > -> Andre "ABPSoft" Beck +++ ABP-RIPE +++ Dresden, Germany, Spacetime <-
     
    Bob by The Bay, Nov 20, 2003
    #8
  9. In article <>, Andre Beck <> wrote:
    :This probably generates a genuine BREAK on the line, which for sure is
    :independend of any flow control (intentionally). BREAK is defined as
    :a long continuous stream of 0-Bits on the async line, with long beeing
    :something between 0.25s and 0.5s.

    BREAK is defined in terms of the line being held at logic 0 for a
    particular period of time. That's slightly different than
    a "continuous stream of 0 bits", but it's probably what you -meant- ;-)
    --
    "Meme" is self-referential; memes exist if and only if the "meme" meme
    exists. "Meme" is thus logically a meta-meme; but until the existance
    of meta-memes is more widely recognized, "meta-meme" is not a meme.
    -- A Child's Garden Of Memes
     
    Walter Roberson, Nov 20, 2003
    #9
  10. Donald Zelenak Jr.

    Andre Beck Guest

    -cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) writes:
    > In article <>, Andre Beck <> wrote:
    > :This probably generates a genuine BREAK on the line, which for sure is
    > :independend of any flow control (intentionally). BREAK is defined as
    > :a long continuous stream of 0-Bits on the async line, with long beeing
    > :something between 0.25s and 0.5s.
    >
    > BREAK is defined in terms of the line being held at logic 0 for a
    > particular period of time. That's slightly different than
    > a "continuous stream of 0 bits", but it's probably what you -meant- ;-)


    Yep ;)

    On the line, they are indistinguishable from each other, so either way
    of describing BREAK is okay, but "beeing held at logic 0" explains better
    what was the intention: A line code violation. On an async line of a
    certain configuration, let's say 8N1, it is impossible for the logic
    level to stay at 0 for significantly longer than 8 bit times. So BREAK
    violates the line code, what makes it an out of band signal.

    BTW, tcsendbreak(3) from my termios(3) manpage uses the "bit stream"
    notion as well:

    tcsendbreak() transmits a continuous stream of zero-valued
    bits for a specific duration, if the terminal is using
    asynchronous serial data transmission.

    BTW2, some devices, including Ciscos, are rumoured to take much less than
    0.25s of zero level to sense a BREAK. It is said that you can BREAK them
    by just setting bps down to 50 and pressing @ or SPACE repeatedly. I never
    had to test this, as I don't use terminals that lack a native BREAK, but
    it sounds like more than a legend.

    > "Meme" is self-referential; memes exist if and only if the "meme" meme
    > exists. "Meme" is thus logically a meta-meme; but until the existance
    > of meta-memes is more widely recognized, "meta-meme" is not a meme.
    > -- A Child's Garden Of Memes


    Brilliant. Are there more of these?

    --
    The _S_anta _C_laus _O_peration
    or "how to turn a complete illusion into a neverending money source"

    -> Andre "ABPSoft" Beck +++ ABP-RIPE +++ Dresden, Germany, Spacetime <-
     
    Andre Beck, Nov 21, 2003
    #10
  11. In article <>, Andre Beck <> wrote:
    :BTW2, some devices, including Ciscos, are rumoured to take much less than
    :0.25s of zero level to sense a BREAK. It is said that you can BREAK them
    :by just setting bps down to 50 and pressing @ or SPACE repeatedly. I never
    :had to test this, as I don't use terminals that lack a native BREAK, but
    :it sounds like more than a legend.

    I've done it myself, back in the old VT100 days. My memory is a bit
    fuzzy, but I seem to recall that setting to 300 bps and pressing space
    was often good enough to send a BREAK to a system running at 9600 bps.

    The Unix autobaud facility for tty's nominally looks for BREAK
    [really for framing errors], and if the previous dial-up user had
    been using a faster speed and I got the session before the system
    had time to realize the line had dropped, I would have to use this
    trick. It wasn't unusual in those days.


    :> -- A Child's Garden Of Memes

    :Brilliant. Are there more of these?

    I've only written two others so far; they've appeared in my .signature
    a few times.

    --
    Beware of bugs in the above code; I have only proved it correct,
    not tried it. -- Donald Knuth
     
    Walter Roberson, Nov 21, 2003
    #11
  12. Donald Zelenak Jr.

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1
    Console port not responding to input from terminal

    Don -
    I have a similar problem with a Cisco 2520 that I just purchased on EBay. The thing is, I was in it on a reverse telnet and changed a few things, walked away for about 20 minutes, then came back and the console port would not respond. I shut the router off and I could see output from the console port but it would not respond to input. I quote you as "I set my TFTP server up and made a basic config file that gives the Ethernet an address, sets a VTY password and I can get into the router via Telnet. I can do anything via Telnet, and it's fast, leading me to believe that the router's CPU is not busy doing other stuff besides handling my console input." How could I do this if the ethernet is admin down? This is totally foreign to me. If I could get in on telnet, I would be satisfied, because I could always console into my Access Server and telnet into the \2520.
    I can get into the aux port but cannot get into priv exec because no password is set. I can do a "sh ip int br" in aux and see that the ethernet 0 is administratively down. I can't do a show config to see the start-config.

    Is there any hope of getting into this thing. I can't even insert a break in the console port.
    Hope to hear from you soon.

    Paul Christopher
    Studying for CCNA
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2007
    , Oct 24, 2007
    #12
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