Circular fisheye for a DSLR?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Ilmari Karonen, Feb 16, 2006.

  1. After using compact digicams for a few years, I bought my first DSLR
    (a Nikon D70s) a few months ago, and have been learning to make proper
    use of it since. I like doing night sky photography, and I've thought
    for some time about getting a 180° circular fisheye lens for full sky
    photos.

    Unfortunately, no-one seems to make circular fisheye lenses for the DX
    / APS-C format. Based on a formula I found online, it seems I'd need
    a 5.5mm fisheye to get 180° coverage in a 15.6mm circle, whereas the
    shortest reasonably priced fisheye lenses seem to be 8mm.

    As far as I can tell, I seem to have three options:

    * Stick to compacts and use a fisheye converter like the Nikon
    FC-E8/E9. Those are fairly reasonably priced, and I've read
    positive comments about the image quality of the E9. But I'd rather
    like to use my fancy new DSLR now that I've got it.

    * Use a .2x fisheye converter with a 24mm lens. The Nikon converters
    mentioned above can apparently be used like that with a suitable
    step down ring, although I've also read vague warnings that this is
    not something they're designed for. This way I could also use the
    same converter on a compact if I wanted. I've also found some other
    inexpensive fisheye converters for sale on the net, such as a .22x
    converter from Opteka, but I've no idea what their quality may be.

    * Use an 8mm or longer fisheye with a relay system like the one shown
    at <http://www.naturfotograf.com/D1_fisheye_1,html.htm>. Frankly,
    the picture on that page scares me.

    So, any suggestions? I'm inclined towards the second option above
    right now, but any ideas are welcome.

    --
    Ilmari Karonen
    To reply by e-mail, please replace ".invalid" with ".net" in address.
    "String theory is all very well, but I think I can beat it with my
    chewing-gum and elastic band theory." -- Lemming on ahbou.d
    Ilmari Karonen, Feb 16, 2006
    #1
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  2. Ilmari Karonen

    Guest

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  3. Ilmari Karonen

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Ilmari
    Karonen <> wrote:

    > After using compact digicams for a few years, I bought my first DSLR
    > (a Nikon D70s) a few months ago, and have been learning to make proper
    > use of it since. I like doing night sky photography, and I've thought
    > for some time about getting a 180° circular fisheye lens for full sky
    > photos.
    >
    > Unfortunately, no-one seems to make circular fisheye lenses for the DX
    > / APS-C format.


    nikon does:
    <http://www.nikonusa.com/template.php?cat=1&grp=5&productNr=2148>

    sigma does:
    <http://www.sigmaphoto.com/lenses/lenses_all_details.asp?navigator=4>

    i didn't check any other lens maker - perhaps there are more.
    nospam, Feb 16, 2006
    #3
  4. Ilmari Karonen

    Aad Guest

    "Ilmari Karonen" <> schreef in bericht
    news:...
    > After using compact digicams for a few years, I bought my first DSLR
    > (a Nikon D70s) a few months ago, and have been learning to make proper
    > use of it since. I like doing night sky photography, and I've thought
    > for some time about getting a 180° circular fisheye lens for full sky
    > photos.
    >
    > Unfortunately, no-one seems to make circular fisheye lenses for the DX
    > / APS-C format. Based on a formula I found online, it seems I'd need
    > a 5.5mm fisheye to get 180° coverage in a 15.6mm circle, whereas the
    > shortest reasonably priced fisheye lenses seem to be 8mm.
    >
    > As far as I can tell, I seem to have three options:
    >
    > * Stick to compacts and use a fisheye converter like the Nikon
    > FC-E8/E9. Those are fairly reasonably priced, and I've read
    > positive comments about the image quality of the E9. But I'd rather
    > like to use my fancy new DSLR now that I've got it.
    >
    > * Use a .2x fisheye converter with a 24mm lens. The Nikon converters
    > mentioned above can apparently be used like that with a suitable
    > step down ring, although I've also read vague warnings that this is
    > not something they're designed for. This way I could also use the
    > same converter on a compact if I wanted. I've also found some other
    > inexpensive fisheye converters for sale on the net, such as a .22x
    > converter from Opteka, but I've no idea what their quality may be.
    >
    > * Use an 8mm or longer fisheye with a relay system like the one shown
    > at <http://www.naturfotograf.com/D1_fisheye_1,html.htm>. Frankly,
    > the picture on that page scares me.
    >
    > So, any suggestions? I'm inclined towards the second option above
    > right now, but any ideas are welcome.
    >
    > --
    > Ilmari Karonen
    > To reply by e-mail, please replace ".invalid" with ".net" in address.
    > "String theory is all very well, but I think I can beat it with my
    > chewing-gum and elastic band theory." -- Lemming on ahbou.d


    I've just received this one yesterday.
    http://www.pauck.de/marco/photo/stuff/peleng_fisheye/peleng_fisheye.html
    It's amazing for that kind of money.
    Aad
    Aad, Feb 16, 2006
    #4
  5. Ilmari Karonen

    Pat Guest

    THE REPLY ABOVE THIS IS SPAM
    THE REPLY ABOVE THIS IS SPAM
    Pat, Feb 16, 2006
    #5
  6. Ilmari Karonen

    george Guest

    "nospam" <> wrote in message
    news:160220061213561200%...
    > In article <>, Ilmari
    > Karonen <> wrote:
    >
    >> After using compact digicams for a few years, I bought my first DSLR
    >> (a Nikon D70s) a few months ago, and have been learning to make proper
    >> use of it since. I like doing night sky photography, and I've thought
    >> for some time about getting a 180° circular fisheye lens for full sky
    >> photos.
    >>
    >> Unfortunately, no-one seems to make circular fisheye lenses for the DX
    >> / APS-C format.

    >
    > nikon does:
    > <http://www.nikonusa.com/template.php?cat=1&grp=5&productNr=2148>
    >
    > sigma does:
    > <http://www.sigmaphoto.com/lenses/lenses_all_details.asp?navigator=4>
    >
    > i didn't check any other lens maker - perhaps there are more.


    Neither of those is a circular fisheye and one is not currently made. If
    you want
    a dslr w/a circular fisheye, your choices are:
    1) Canon FF dslr w/Nikon circular fisheye w/EOS-Nikon adapter
    2) Canon FF dslr w/Canon FD circular fisheye w/EOS-FD adapter
    george, Feb 16, 2006
    #6
  7. Ilmari Karonen

    george Guest

    "Aad" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Ilmari Karonen" <> schreef in bericht
    > news:...
    >> After using compact digicams for a few years, I bought my first DSLR
    >> (a Nikon D70s) a few months ago, and have been learning to make proper
    >> use of it since. I like doing night sky photography, and I've thought
    >> for some time about getting a 180° circular fisheye lens for full sky
    >> photos.
    >>
    >> Unfortunately, no-one seems to make circular fisheye lenses for the DX
    >> / APS-C format. Based on a formula I found online, it seems I'd need
    >> a 5.5mm fisheye to get 180° coverage in a 15.6mm circle, whereas the
    >> shortest reasonably priced fisheye lenses seem to be 8mm.
    >>
    >> As far as I can tell, I seem to have three options:
    >>
    >> * Stick to compacts and use a fisheye converter like the Nikon
    >> FC-E8/E9. Those are fairly reasonably priced, and I've read
    >> positive comments about the image quality of the E9. But I'd rather
    >> like to use my fancy new DSLR now that I've got it.
    >>
    >> * Use a .2x fisheye converter with a 24mm lens. The Nikon converters
    >> mentioned above can apparently be used like that with a suitable
    >> step down ring, although I've also read vague warnings that this is
    >> not something they're designed for. This way I could also use the
    >> same converter on a compact if I wanted. I've also found some other
    >> inexpensive fisheye converters for sale on the net, such as a .22x
    >> converter from Opteka, but I've no idea what their quality may be.
    >>
    >> * Use an 8mm or longer fisheye with a relay system like the one shown
    >> at <http://www.naturfotograf.com/D1_fisheye_1,html.htm>. Frankly,
    >> the picture on that page scares me.
    >>
    >> So, any suggestions? I'm inclined towards the second option above
    >> right now, but any ideas are welcome.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Ilmari Karonen
    >> To reply by e-mail, please replace ".invalid" with ".net" in address.
    >> "String theory is all very well, but I think I can beat it with my
    >> chewing-gum and elastic band theory." -- Lemming on ahbou.d

    >
    > I've just received this one yesterday.
    > http://www.pauck.de/marco/photo/stuff/peleng_fisheye/peleng_fisheye.html
    > It's amazing for that kind of money.
    > Aad
    >

    Nope, again not circular fisheye...they aren't being made currently by
    either Nikon or
    Canon (or anyone else left in the photo business). You CAN adapt an older
    Nikon or
    Canon circular fisheye to a FF Canon dslr or Kodak dslr.
    george, Feb 16, 2006
    #7
  8. Ilmari Karonen

    Aad Guest

    "george" <> schreef in bericht
    news:8b6Jf.110$...
    >
    > "Aad" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>
    >> "Ilmari Karonen" <> schreef in bericht
    >> news:...
    >>> After using compact digicams for a few years, I bought my first DSLR
    >>> (a Nikon D70s) a few months ago, and have been learning to make proper
    >>> use of it since. I like doing night sky photography, and I've thought
    >>> for some time about getting a 180° circular fisheye lens for full sky
    >>> photos.
    >>>
    >>> Unfortunately, no-one seems to make circular fisheye lenses for the DX
    >>> / APS-C format. Based on a formula I found online, it seems I'd need
    >>> a 5.5mm fisheye to get 180° coverage in a 15.6mm circle, whereas the
    >>> shortest reasonably priced fisheye lenses seem to be 8mm.
    >>>
    >>> As far as I can tell, I seem to have three options:
    >>>
    >>> * Stick to compacts and use a fisheye converter like the Nikon
    >>> FC-E8/E9. Those are fairly reasonably priced, and I've read
    >>> positive comments about the image quality of the E9. But I'd rather
    >>> like to use my fancy new DSLR now that I've got it.
    >>>
    >>> * Use a .2x fisheye converter with a 24mm lens. The Nikon converters
    >>> mentioned above can apparently be used like that with a suitable
    >>> step down ring, although I've also read vague warnings that this is
    >>> not something they're designed for. This way I could also use the
    >>> same converter on a compact if I wanted. I've also found some other
    >>> inexpensive fisheye converters for sale on the net, such as a .22x
    >>> converter from Opteka, but I've no idea what their quality may be.
    >>>
    >>> * Use an 8mm or longer fisheye with a relay system like the one shown
    >>> at <http://www.naturfotograf.com/D1_fisheye_1,html.htm>. Frankly,
    >>> the picture on that page scares me.
    >>>
    >>> So, any suggestions? I'm inclined towards the second option above
    >>> right now, but any ideas are welcome.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Ilmari Karonen
    >>> To reply by e-mail, please replace ".invalid" with ".net" in address.
    >>> "String theory is all very well, but I think I can beat it with my
    >>> chewing-gum and elastic band theory." -- Lemming on ahbou.d

    >>
    >> I've just received this one yesterday.
    >> http://www.pauck.de/marco/photo/stuff/peleng_fisheye/peleng_fisheye.html
    >> It's amazing for that kind of money.
    >> Aad
    >>

    > Nope, again not circular fisheye...they aren't being made currently by
    > either Nikon or
    > Canon (or anyone else left in the photo business). You CAN adapt an older
    > Nikon or
    > Canon circular fisheye to a FF Canon dslr or Kodak dslr.
    >

    Youre mistaking. On my 1.6 crop sensor I still have an 180 degree view. And
    circulair it is.
    Look halfway this page. You'll see the difference between FF and APS.
    http://www.muellerworld.com/peleng/
    Aad
    Aad, Feb 16, 2006
    #8
  9. Ilmari Karonen

    Guest

    Aad wrote:

    > "george" <> schreef in bericht
    > news:8b6Jf.110$...

    <big snip>
    > > Nope, again not circular fisheye...they aren't being made currently by
    > > either Nikon or
    > > Canon (or anyone else left in the photo business). You CAN adapt an older
    > > Nikon or
    > > Canon circular fisheye to a FF Canon dslr or Kodak dslr.
    > >

    > Youre mistaking. On my 1.6 crop sensor I still have an 180 degree view. And
    > circulair it is.
    > Look halfway this page. You'll see the difference between FF and APS.
    > http://www.muellerworld.com/peleng/
    > Aad


    The link provided goes to a 404 error page because Google Groups
    included your nym (Aad) as the last part of the URL. (it looked like
    this: http://www.muellerworld.com/peleng/Aad in your reply)
    Try "bracketing" the URL in future, like this:
    <http://www.muellerworld.com/peleng/>

    I also get a very similar 180 degree images with my 8mm Peleng Fish-eye
    lens and Pentax ist-Ds, which co-incidently has the same 1.5 crop
    sensor that your Nikon does :)
    , Feb 17, 2006
    #9
  10. On Thu, 16 Feb 2006 22:50:57 +0100, in rec.photo.digital "Aad"
    <> wrote:


    >Youre mistaking. On my 1.6 crop sensor I still have an 180 degree view. And
    >circulair it is.
    >Look halfway this page. You'll see the difference between FF and APS.
    >http://www.muellerworld.com/peleng/


    No, it says:

    A Note about Digital Cameras and the Peleng 8mm Lens:

    Using this lens with a Nikon D70/D100/D1x/D2H or a Fuji S2/S1 will
    effectively crop the circular fisheye to that of a 12mm lens which is
    nearly full frame.

    This is NOT a circular 180 FOV.

    --
    Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 ()
    http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Feb 17, 2006
    #10
  11. Ilmari Karonen

    jean Guest

    "Aad" <> a écrit dans le message de
    news:...
    >
    > "Ilmari Karonen" <> schreef in bericht
    > news:...
    > > After using compact digicams for a few years, I bought my first DSLR
    > > (a Nikon D70s) a few months ago, and have been learning to make proper
    > > use of it since. I like doing night sky photography, and I've thought
    > > for some time about getting a 180° circular fisheye lens for full sky
    > > photos.
    > >
    > > Unfortunately, no-one seems to make circular fisheye lenses for the DX
    > > / APS-C format. Based on a formula I found online, it seems I'd need
    > > a 5.5mm fisheye to get 180° coverage in a 15.6mm circle, whereas the
    > > shortest reasonably priced fisheye lenses seem to be 8mm.
    > >
    > > As far as I can tell, I seem to have three options:
    > >
    > > * Stick to compacts and use a fisheye converter like the Nikon
    > > FC-E8/E9. Those are fairly reasonably priced, and I've read
    > > positive comments about the image quality of the E9. But I'd rather
    > > like to use my fancy new DSLR now that I've got it.
    > >
    > > * Use a .2x fisheye converter with a 24mm lens. The Nikon converters
    > > mentioned above can apparently be used like that with a suitable
    > > step down ring, although I've also read vague warnings that this is
    > > not something they're designed for. This way I could also use the
    > > same converter on a compact if I wanted. I've also found some other
    > > inexpensive fisheye converters for sale on the net, such as a .22x
    > > converter from Opteka, but I've no idea what their quality may be.
    > >
    > > * Use an 8mm or longer fisheye with a relay system like the one shown
    > > at <http://www.naturfotograf.com/D1_fisheye_1,html.htm>. Frankly,
    > > the picture on that page scares me.
    > >
    > > So, any suggestions? I'm inclined towards the second option above
    > > right now, but any ideas are welcome.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Ilmari Karonen
    > > To reply by e-mail, please replace ".invalid" with ".net" in address.
    > > "String theory is all very well, but I think I can beat it with my
    > > chewing-gum and elastic band theory." -- Lemming on ahbou.d

    >
    > I've just received this one yesterday.
    > http://www.pauck.de/marco/photo/stuff/peleng_fisheye/peleng_fisheye.html
    > It's amazing for that kind of money.
    > Aad
    >


    I will second the tip for the Peleng lens, see
    http://www.pbase.com/jeandr/image/55918873 or
    http://www.pbase.com/jeandr/image/55918874 taken with a Canon 10D. While it
    is not a "true" circular fisheye lens, at the price it can't be beat. It is
    easy to find on e-bay for a bit less tha $200, adapter included. My seller
    was Kiev Cameras in case you were wondering. The closest to the 8mm Peleng
    would be an 8mm Sigma which looks less crude but is nonetheless 3 times more
    expensive. You can get some pretty neat effects as is or by "defishing" the
    image with Photoshop or PTlens. The only downside to the Peleng is the lens
    cap which will not stay on.

    Jean
    jean, Feb 17, 2006
    #11
  12. Ilmari Karonen

    cjcampbell Guest

    nospam wrote:
    > In article <>, Ilmari
    > Karonen <> wrote:
    >
    > > After using compact digicams for a few years, I bought my first DSLR
    > > (a Nikon D70s) a few months ago, and have been learning to make proper
    > > use of it since. I like doing night sky photography, and I've thought
    > > for some time about getting a 180° circular fisheye lens for full sky
    > > photos.
    > >
    > > Unfortunately, no-one seems to make circular fisheye lenses for the DX
    > > / APS-C format.

    >
    > nikon does:
    > <http://www.nikonusa.com/template.php?cat=1&grp=5&productNr=2148>
    >


    I have this lens. It is a great lens, reasonably priced, and it does do
    180 degrees, but only in one direction. It does not give a circular
    image; it is a rectangular image. Nikon Capture actually has a special
    adjustment for this lens which removes the distortion and converts
    pictures taken with it to super wide angle. Of course, the same thing
    can be accomplished in PhotoShop, but the one-click solution in Capture
    is difficult to beat.

    > sigma does:
    > <http://www.sigmaphoto.com/lenses/lenses_all_details.asp?navigator=4>
    >
    > i didn't check any other lens maker - perhaps there are more.
    cjcampbell, Feb 17, 2006
    #12
  13. Ilmari Karonen

    Aad Guest

    "Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!)" <> schreef in
    bericht news:...
    > On Thu, 16 Feb 2006 22:50:57 +0100, in rec.photo.digital "Aad"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Youre mistaking. On my 1.6 crop sensor I still have an 180 degree view.
    >>And
    >>circulair it is.
    >>Look halfway this page. You'll see the difference between FF and APS.
    >>http://www.muellerworld.com/peleng/

    >
    > No, it says:
    >
    > A Note about Digital Cameras and the Peleng 8mm Lens:
    >
    > Using this lens with a Nikon D70/D100/D1x/D2H or a Fuji S2/S1 will
    > effectively crop the circular fisheye to that of a 12mm lens which is
    > nearly full frame.
    >
    > This is NOT a circular 180 FOV.
    >
    > --
    > Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 ()
    > http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html


    Sorry, you're right. Its 180 horizontal, not vertical.
    (unless you turn your camera ;-))
    Aad
    Aad, Feb 17, 2006
    #13
  14. On Thu, 16 Feb 2006 21:51:54 +0200, in rec.photo.digital Ilmari Karonen
    <> wrote:

    >* Stick to compacts and use a fisheye converter like the Nikon
    > FC-E8/E9. Those are fairly reasonably priced, and I've read
    > positive comments about the image quality of the E9. But I'd rather
    > like to use my fancy new DSLR now that I've got it.


    Caveat on this approach, get a old 99x/4500 and the FC-E8 if you go this
    route. I loved my 990 and FC-E8. I found the FC-E9used with my 5700 to be
    totally inferior and limited in use, and would not recommend it to anyone
    for serious work.
    --
    Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 ()
    http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Feb 17, 2006
    #14
  15. Ilmari Karonen

    RK Guest

    Anybody use this lens with Oly E system? I'm thinking about it to avoid
    sticker shock....
    RK, Feb 17, 2006
    #15
  16. Ilmari Karonen

    John Wilson Guest

    On Fri, 17 Feb 2006 05:43:06 -0500, "Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN
    SIG!)" <> wrote:

    >On Thu, 16 Feb 2006 21:51:54 +0200, in rec.photo.digital Ilmari Karonen
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>* Stick to compacts and use a fisheye converter like the Nikon
    >> FC-E8/E9. Those are fairly reasonably priced, and I've read
    >> positive comments about the image quality of the E9. But I'd rather
    >> like to use my fancy new DSLR now that I've got it.

    >
    >Caveat on this approach, get a old 99x/4500 and the FC-E8 if you go this
    >route. I loved my 990 and FC-E8. I found the FC-E9used with my 5700 to be
    >totally inferior and limited in use, and would not recommend it to anyone
    >for serious work.
    >--
    >Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 ()
    >http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html

    Agreed about the E9 quality ....

    I've got a E9 fisheye with a 8Mp Nikon 8400 high-end compact. Not
    impressed with the image quality, although I do get a 180 degree plus
    circular image.
    John Wilson
    jwilsonNO*
    Remove characters from e-mail address to reply
    www.yachtsnet.co.uk - full service online yacht
    brokerage with full details and multiple photos
    of all boats. Free classified adverts for small
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    John Wilson, Feb 17, 2006
    #16
  17. In article <1net.com>,
    (John Wilson) wrote:

    > I've got a E9 fisheye with a 8Mp Nikon 8400 high-end compact. Not
    > impressed with the image quality, although I do get a 180 degree plus
    > circular image.


    John et al-

    Get a metal screw-in lens cover for a fixed-focal length lens. Drill a
    hole in its exact center and mount one of those viewers like you have on
    your front door to see who is outside. Be very careful that the resulting
    mount does not touch the lens surface when it is screwed into the lens.

    As you mentioned, the image quality won't be that great, but it makes for
    a really cheap fisheye!

    Fred
    Fred McKenzie, Feb 21, 2006
    #17
  18. Ilmari Karonen

    Father Kodak Guest

    On Mon, 20 Feb 2006 21:36:53 -0500, (Fred McKenzie)
    wrote:


    >John et al-
    >
    >Get a metal screw-in lens cover for a fixed-focal length lens. Drill a
    >hole in its exact center and mount one of those viewers like you have on
    >your front door to see who is outside. Be very careful that the resulting
    >mount does not touch the lens surface when it is screwed into the lens.
    >
    >As you mentioned, the image quality won't be that great, but it makes for
    >a really cheap fisheye!


    OK, but how do you focus! the thing?

    Father Kodak
    Father Kodak, Mar 5, 2006
    #18
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