Cig lighter

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Ross Jones, Dec 31, 2004.

  1. Ross Jones

    Ross Jones Guest

    I think it would be 10 amps. Check the circuit fuse
    Ross Jones
    From: "Gary" <>
    Subject: Re: Cigarette Lighter
    Date: Friday, December 31, 2004 1:12 AM

    Himszy wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Does anyone know the amp. that comes out of cars, via the cigarette

    lighter?
    >
    > Thanks Michael
    >
    >

    Try again. Use English. Use more words.
    Ross Jones, Dec 31, 2004
    #1
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  2. Ross Jones

    DC Guest

    Ross Jones wrote:
    > I think it would be 10 amps. Check the circuit fuse
    > Ross Jones
    > From: "Gary" <>
    > Subject: Re: Cigarette Lighter
    > Date: Friday, December 31, 2004 1:12 AM


    > Himszy wrote:


    >> Hi,


    >> Does anyone know the amp. that comes out of cars, via the cigarette

    > lighter?


    >> Thanks Michael



    > Try again. Use English. Use more words.



    Why are you starting a new thread? Respond to the OP.

    --
    DC Linux RU #1000111011000111001

    It's not the software that's free; it's you.
    DC, Dec 31, 2004
    #2
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  3. Ross Jones

    Wanderer Guest

    "Ross Jones" <> wrote:

    >I think it would be 10 amps. Check the circuit fuse
    >Ross Jones


    Voltage is 12V from the battery.
    V=IR
    Voltage is equal to the number of amps (I) multiplied by the resistance
    or
    AMPS (I)
    I=R/V
    What it amounts to is the higher the resistance to the applied voltage
    means a lower amperage resulting in alot more heat. AKA the electricity
    struggles alot more to get through the thick, highly resistant coils of
    the cigarette lighter to get to the other end of the wire. That work
    creates heat. More resistance creates more heat, buts less current. It
    has to struggle through the wire. Current can't move as fast and makes
    alot of heat the harder it has to fight to get where it's going.

    High current is a fast river with very little resistance. Low current
    can be a slow river can result from a high resistance and much heat.

    Note the "cold" soldering craze.

    Someone, Somewhen, Somewhere.
    Wanderer, Dec 31, 2004
    #3
  4. Ross Jones

    trout Guest

    Wanderer wrote:

    > "Ross Jones" <> wrote:
    >
    >> I think it would be 10 amps. Check the circuit fuse
    >> Ross Jones

    >
    > Voltage is 12V from the battery.
    > V=IR
    > Voltage is equal to the number of amps (I) multiplied by the
    > resistance or
    > AMPS (I)
    > I=R/V
    > What it amounts to is the higher the resistance to the applied voltage
    > means a lower amperage resulting in alot more heat. AKA the
    > electricity struggles alot more to get through the thick, highly
    > resistant coils of the cigarette lighter to get to the other end of
    > the wire. That work creates heat. More resistance creates more
    > heat, buts less current. It has to struggle through the wire.
    > Current can't move as fast and makes alot of heat the harder it has
    > to fight to get where it's going.
    >
    > High current is a fast river with very little resistance. Low current
    > can be a slow river can result from a high resistance and much heat.
    >
    > Note the "cold" soldering craze.


    Okay; I'm curious, and yet too lazy to do my own research. How *is*
    this (unfortunately-named) 'cold heat' accomplished? The info-mmercial
    example I'm thinking of has an input of six volts (four 'AA' 1.5
    batteries). It is supposed to be heated only on contact with solder, and
    then quickly cool. On first glance; I assumed that the soldering tip
    must be a circuit that was 'shorted' to produce the heat.
    Unscientifically, there doesn't seem to be enough raw mass to produce
    over-heating due to resistance. I've also never seen a cigarette lighter
    cool-down very quickly. But I do not pretend to be expert in the area.
    --
    "I'd like to know how it works (even though I'll probably continue to
    melt solder in a more traditional manner)."
    trout, Dec 31, 2004
    #4
  5. Ross Jones

    John Guest

    What a total load of crap, go back to school.

    "highly resistant coils of the cigarette lighter" Ho Ho Ho

    Try substitution in ohms law, and find out how it really works !


    "Wanderer" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Ross Jones" <> wrote:
    >
    >>I think it would be 10 amps. Check the circuit fuse
    >>Ross Jones

    >
    > Voltage is 12V from the battery.
    > V=IR
    > Voltage is equal to the number of amps (I) multiplied by the resistance
    > or
    > AMPS (I)
    > I=R/V
    > What it amounts to is the higher the resistance to the applied voltage
    > means a lower amperage resulting in alot more heat. AKA the electricity
    > struggles alot more to get through the thick, highly resistant coils of
    > the cigarette lighter to get to the other end of the wire. That work
    > creates heat. More resistance creates more heat, buts less current. It
    > has to struggle through the wire. Current can't move as fast and makes
    > alot of heat the harder it has to fight to get where it's going.
    >
    > High current is a fast river with very little resistance. Low current
    > can be a slow river can result from a high resistance and much heat.
    >
    > Note the "cold" soldering craze.
    >
    > Someone, Somewhen, Somewhere.
    >
    >
    John, Dec 31, 2004
    #5
  6. Ross Jones

    Yddap Guest

    In news:,
    trout <> opined very noisily:
    > Wanderer wrote:
    >
    >> "Ross Jones" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I think it would be 10 amps. Check the circuit fuse
    >>> Ross Jones

    >>
    >> Voltage is 12V from the battery.
    >> V=IR
    >> Voltage is equal to the number of amps (I) multiplied by the
    >> resistance or
    >> AMPS (I)
    >> I=R/V
    >> What it amounts to is the higher the resistance to the applied
    >> voltage means a lower amperage resulting in alot more heat. AKA the
    >> electricity struggles alot more to get through the thick, highly
    >> resistant coils of the cigarette lighter to get to the other end of
    >> the wire. That work creates heat. More resistance creates more
    >> heat, buts less current. It has to struggle through the wire.
    >> Current can't move as fast and makes alot of heat the harder it has
    >> to fight to get where it's going.
    >>
    >> High current is a fast river with very little resistance. Low
    >> current can be a slow river can result from a high resistance and
    >> much heat.
    >>
    >> Note the "cold" soldering craze.

    Try the next stage from OHMS law
    I / R = Watts ( heat effectivly)
    True for DC and a good approximation for AC
    :-(
    --

    Yddap
    Remove guts to reply
    Yddap, Dec 31, 2004
    #6
  7. On 31 Dec 2004, Wanderer scribbled in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:

    > "Ross Jones" <> wrote:
    >
    >>I think it would be 10 amps. Check the circuit fuse
    >>Ross Jones

    >
    > Voltage is 12V from the battery.
    > V=IR
    > Voltage is equal to the number of amps (I) multiplied by the
    > resistance or
    > AMPS (I)
    > I=R/V
    > What it amounts to is the higher the resistance to the applied
    > voltage means a lower amperage resulting in alot more heat. AKA
    > the electricity struggles alot more to get through the thick,
    > highly resistant coils of the cigarette lighter to get to the
    > other end of the wire. That work creates heat. More resistance
    > creates more heat, buts less current. It has to struggle through
    > the wire. Current can't move as fast and makes alot of heat the
    > harder it has to fight to get where it's going.
    >
    > High current is a fast river with very little resistance. Low
    > current can be a slow river can result from a high resistance and
    > much heat.
    >
    > Note the "cold" soldering craze.
    >
    > Someone, Somewhen, Somewhere.
    >
    >


    Er, I think you ought to pick up a textbook (in your case, one with
    lots of pictures), and do a little studying.

    "Aw, look at that cute little amp. He's really struggling, isn't he?"

    Sheesh...

    --
    The Old Sourdough
    I typed the word Google into Google.
    Guess what came up?
    Everything.-George Carlin
    The Old Sourdough, Dec 31, 2004
    #7
  8. "Yddap" <> wrote in message news:eN9Bd.15$> Try the
    next stage from OHMS law
    > I / R = Watts ( heat effectivly)
    > True for DC and a good approximation for AC


    Dude - if you use your "good approximation formula" then you will get an
    "approximate" value. Do it right or don't do it at all!

    For an ac circuit use - apparent power = (Iz)squaredZ

    in english that means impedance current (in ohms) squared times total
    circuit impedance.
    Captain America, Dec 31, 2004
    #8
  9. Ross Jones

    Wanderer Guest

    The Old Sourdough <sameas@above> wrote:

    >On 31 Dec 2004, Wanderer scribbled in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:
    >
    >> "Ross Jones" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I think it would be 10 amps. Check the circuit fuse
    >>>Ross Jones

    >>
    >> Voltage is 12V from the battery.
    >> V=IR
    >> Voltage is equal to the number of amps (I) multiplied by the
    >> resistance or
    >> AMPS (I)
    >> I=R/V
    >> What it amounts to is the higher the resistance to the applied
    >> voltage means a lower amperage resulting in alot more heat. AKA
    >> the electricity struggles alot more to get through the thick,
    >> highly resistant coils of the cigarette lighter to get to the
    >> other end of the wire. That work creates heat. More resistance
    >> creates more heat, buts less current. It has to struggle through
    >> the wire. Current can't move as fast and makes alot of heat the
    >> harder it has to fight to get where it's going.
    >>
    >> High current is a fast river with very little resistance. Low
    >> current can be a slow river can result from a high resistance and
    >> much heat.
    >>
    >> Note the "cold" soldering craze.
    >>
    >> Someone, Somewhen, Somewhere.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Er, I think you ought to pick up a textbook (in your case, one with
    >lots of pictures), and do a little studying.
    >
    >"Aw, look at that cute little amp. He's really struggling, isn't he?"
    >
    >Sheesh...


    The little amp is struggling in order to create heat. Because, the end
    result is heat, and fast heat, fast cool is the desired result.

    Figuring out how that can be made to happen is the desired result.

    Applied science.

    What would it take to get the result one wants?

    I haven't needed to think about it until now. :)

    Wanderer
    Wanderer, Jan 1, 2005
    #9
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