Choosing PC components

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by akiwi, Apr 29, 2005.

  1. akiwi

    akiwi Guest

    Any ideas on how to choose CPU components on Ascent PC Builder with
    performance roughly the same as the following parts, but with an
    assurance of a reasonably quiet system. The PSU needs to cope with at
    least two hard drives and maybe two monitors but there'll probably be
    just one LCD monitor and drive to start with.
    http://www.ascent.co.nz/pcbuild.asp

    Intel D915GUXL motherboard, Socket 775, Pentium 4, 800MHz FSB
    $238

    Intel Pentium 4, 3.2 GHz CPU, 800 Mhz FSB, Prescott Socket 478,
    $414

    Cooler Master Cavalier 3, ATX Mid Tower Case, 350W PSU, Silver
    $239

    Seagate Barracuda 7200.7 ST3160023A, 160 GB, 7,200rpm,
    $166


    What advantage or disadvantage is there in getting a 64 bit CPU if you
    don't run applications that target 64 bit.

    Also what is the difference between 1GB RAM DDR2 533 and DDR2 333? -
    any recommendations for a 1GB RAM chip?

    Thanks in advance.
    akiwi
     
    akiwi, Apr 29, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. akiwi wrote:
    > Any ideas on how to choose CPU components on Ascent PC Builder with
    > performance roughly the same as the following parts, but with an
    > assurance of a reasonably quiet system. The PSU needs to cope with at
    > least two hard drives and maybe two monitors but there'll probably be
    > just one LCD monitor and drive to start with.
    > http://www.ascent.co.nz/pcbuild.asp


    The PSU no longer powers the LCD/monitor, and hasn't for quite a while.
    Coolermaster seem to make faily good gear, so a 350 from them will
    probably be enough for what you want, although you dont mention which
    VGA card you may be getting, if any.

    > What advantage or disadvantage is there in getting a 64 bit CPU if you
    > don't run applications that target 64 bit.


    The AMD 64/FX/Opteron CPUs have the memory controller on the CPU,
    meaning a lot less latency when trying to access memory, other than
    that, if you're only using 32bit apps and OS, it'll make **** difference.

    > Also what is the difference between 1GB RAM DDR2 533 and DDR2 333? -
    > any recommendations for a 1GB RAM chip?


    A lot, if getting DDR2, you want it as fast as you can get, DDR2 is
    higher in latency than DDR, and so it makes it kinda important to make
    sure you get it as fast as possible.

    1GB ram chip?
    ummm, normally I go for 2x512MB over 1x1GB
    Not sure why, but have always preferred it.
    Kingmax seems to make good stuff DDR wise, but I don't know much about
    DDR2, overslocker type websites are normally quite good for memory details.
     
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Apr 29, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. akiwi

    akiwi Guest

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 15:14:32 +1200, "Dave - Dave.net.nz"
    <> wrote:

    >akiwi wrote:
    >> Any ideas on how to choose CPU components on Ascent PC Builder with
    >> performance roughly the same as the following parts, but with an
    >> assurance of a reasonably quiet system. The PSU needs to cope with at
    >> least two hard drives and maybe two monitors but there'll probably be
    >> just one LCD monitor and drive to start with.
    >> http://www.ascent.co.nz/pcbuild.asp

    >
    >The PSU no longer powers the LCD/monitor, and hasn't for quite a while.
    >Coolermaster seem to make faily good gear, so a 350 from them will
    >probably be enough for what you want, although you dont mention which
    >VGA card you may be getting, if any.



    I'll probably need a graphics card to get DVI for the LCD monitor but
    it won't be used for games so probably just an average to low-end card
    e.g. Gigabyte radeon 9250 as in the value-for-money PC builder config.


    >
    >> What advantage or disadvantage is there in getting a 64 bit CPU if you
    >> don't run applications that target 64 bit.

    >
    >The AMD 64/FX/Opteron CPUs have the memory controller on the CPU,
    >meaning a lot less latency when trying to access memory, other than
    >that, if you're only using 32bit apps and OS, it'll make **** difference.
    >
    >> Also what is the difference between 1GB RAM DDR2 533 and DDR2 333? -
    >> any recommendations for a 1GB RAM chip?

    >
    >A lot, if getting DDR2, you want it as fast as you can get, DDR2 is
    >higher in latency than DDR, and so it makes it kinda important to make
    >sure you get it as fast as possible.
    >
    >1GB ram chip?
    >ummm, normally I go for 2x512MB over 1x1GB
    >Not sure why, but have always preferred it.
    >Kingmax seems to make good stuff DDR wise, but I don't know much about
    >DDR2, overslocker type websites are normally quite good for memory details.


    ok, DDR RAM then.

    Longhorn and .NET apps will consume heaps of RAM so 1GB chip makes
    better use of RAM slots than 512 MB, to allow for expansion.

    Thanks
    akiwi
     
    akiwi, Apr 29, 2005
    #3
  4. akiwi wrote:
    > Longhorn and .NET apps will consume heaps of RAM so 1GB chip makes
    > better use of RAM slots than 512 MB, to allow for expansion.


    MS released something today stating that a "modern CPU and 512MB ram"
    would be sufficient for Longhorn, take from that what you will.

    usually I double what they say, and it flies, so, a super modern CPU(the
    latest), and 1Gbyte of RAM should do it...
     
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Apr 29, 2005
    #4
  5. akiwi

    Guest

    The motherboard you mentioned has dual memory channels, so you need to
    install DIMMS in matched pairs for best performance, i.e. two 512MB
    DIMMs.
     
    , Apr 29, 2005
    #5
  6. akiwi

    CSE Guest

    On 28 Apr 2005 20:51:22 -0700, wrote:

    >The motherboard you mentioned has dual memory channels, so you need to
    >install DIMMS in matched pairs for best performance, i.e. two 512MB
    >DIMMs.




    They don't have to be Matched, just the same Type..
     
    CSE, Apr 29, 2005
    #6
  7. akiwi

    Jerry Guest

    Dave - Dave.net.nz wrote:
    > akiwi wrote:
    >
    >> Longhorn and .NET apps will consume heaps of RAM so 1GB chip makes
    >> better use of RAM slots than 512 MB, to allow for expansion.

    >
    >
    > MS released something today stating that a "modern CPU and 512MB ram"
    > would be sufficient for Longhorn, take from that what you will.
    >
    > usually I double what they say, and it flies, so, a super modern CPU(the
    > latest), and 1Gbyte of RAM should do it...


    and double the RAM again if you want any performance out of it, so 2Gb
    should be a reasonable system.
     
    Jerry, Apr 29, 2005
    #7
  8. akiwi

    akiwi Guest

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 15:08:06 +1200, akiwi <> wrote:

    >
    >
    >Any ideas on how to choose CPU components on Ascent PC Builder with
    >performance roughly the same as the following parts, but with an
    >assurance of a reasonably quiet system. The PSU needs to cope with at
    >least two hard drives and maybe two monitors but there'll probably be
    >just one LCD monitor and drive to start with.
    >http://www.ascent.co.nz/pcbuild.asp
    >
    >Intel D915GUXL motherboard, Socket 775, Pentium 4, 800MHz FSB
    >$238
    >
    >Intel Pentium 4, 3.2 GHz CPU, 800 Mhz FSB, Prescott Socket 478,
    >$414
    >
    >Cooler Master Cavalier 3, ATX Mid Tower Case, 350W PSU, Silver
    >$239



    It seems the Prescott is a hot-running CPU and the Cavalier cooling is
    only adequate and not exceptional (actually described as inadequate in
    one review on the Cavalier 1) but is exceptionally quiet. Any ideas
    for a cooler CPU with similar performance as P4 3.2 and/or a quiet but
    well performing cooling system?

    akiwi
     
    akiwi, Apr 29, 2005
    #8
  9. akiwi

    Jerry Guest

    akiwi wrote:
    > On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 15:08:06 +1200, akiwi <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >>Any ideas on how to choose CPU components on Ascent PC Builder with
    >>performance roughly the same as the following parts, but with an
    >>assurance of a reasonably quiet system. The PSU needs to cope with at
    >>least two hard drives and maybe two monitors but there'll probably be
    >>just one LCD monitor and drive to start with.
    >>http://www.ascent.co.nz/pcbuild.asp
    >>
    >>Intel D915GUXL motherboard, Socket 775, Pentium 4, 800MHz FSB
    >>$238
    >>
    >>Intel Pentium 4, 3.2 GHz CPU, 800 Mhz FSB, Prescott Socket 478,
    >>$414
    >>
    >>Cooler Master Cavalier 3, ATX Mid Tower Case, 350W PSU, Silver
    >>$239

    >
    >
    >
    > It seems the Prescott is a hot-running CPU and the Cavalier cooling is
    > only adequate and not exceptional (actually described as inadequate in
    > one review on the Cavalier 1) but is exceptionally quiet. Any ideas
    > for a cooler CPU with similar performance as P4 3.2 and/or a quiet but
    > well performing cooling system?
    >
    > akiwi


    no fan at all is even quieter, you just hear a "tink" sound from the
    cpu, and you only ever hear that once.

    Jerry
     
    Jerry, Apr 29, 2005
    #9
  10. akiwi

    akiwi Guest

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 17:58:56 +1200, Jerry <> wrote:

    >akiwi wrote:
    >> On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 15:08:06 +1200, akiwi <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> It seems the Prescott is a hot-running CPU and the Cavalier cooling is
    >> only adequate and not exceptional (actually described as inadequate in
    >> one review on the Cavalier 1) but is exceptionally quiet. Any ideas
    >> for a cooler CPU with similar performance as P4 3.2 and/or a quiet but
    >> well performing cooling system?
    >>
    >> akiwi

    >
    >no fan at all is even quieter, you just hear a "tink" sound from the
    >cpu, and you only ever hear that once.



    Well I've found out how to get cool and quiet Prescott here
    http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/article/1742/

    but I don't know how to go about achieving that and I'm not thrilled
    about having a heat-producing PC.

    akiwi
     
    akiwi, Apr 29, 2005
    #10
  11. akiwi

    CSE Guest

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 18:15:04 +1200, akiwi <> wrote:

    >On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 17:58:56 +1200, Jerry <> wrote:
    >
    >>akiwi wrote:
    >>> On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 15:08:06 +1200, akiwi <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> It seems the Prescott is a hot-running CPU and the Cavalier cooling is
    >>> only adequate and not exceptional (actually described as inadequate in
    >>> one review on the Cavalier 1) but is exceptionally quiet. Any ideas
    >>> for a cooler CPU with similar performance as P4 3.2 and/or a quiet but
    >>> well performing cooling system?
    >>>
    >>> akiwi

    >>
    >>no fan at all is even quieter, you just hear a "tink" sound from the
    >>cpu, and you only ever hear that once.

    >
    >
    >Well I've found out how to get cool and quiet Prescott here
    >http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/article/1742/
    >
    >but I don't know how to go about achieving that and I'm not thrilled
    >about having a heat-producing PC.
    >
    >akiwi




    That is why I managed with a lot of hunting to get a P4 3.2c Northwood,
    before they all sold out, the Prescott does not give any real benefits with
    most benchmarks

    Intel stops selling these from June this year..

    May be you can get one from the USA..
     
    CSE, Apr 29, 2005
    #11
  12. akiwi

    Mackin Guest

    akiwi wrote:

    > On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 17:58:56 +1200, Jerry <> wrote:
    >
    >>akiwi wrote:
    >>> On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 15:08:06 +1200, akiwi <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> It seems the Prescott is a hot-running CPU and the Cavalier cooling is
    >>> only adequate and not exceptional (actually described as inadequate in
    >>> one review on the Cavalier 1) but is exceptionally quiet. Any ideas
    >>> for a cooler CPU with similar performance as P4 3.2 and/or a quiet but
    >>> well performing cooling system?
    >>>
    >>> akiwi

    >>
    >>no fan at all is even quieter, you just hear a "tink" sound from the
    >>cpu, and you only ever hear that once.

    >
    >
    > Well I've found out how to get cool and quiet Prescott here
    > http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/article/1742/
    >
    > but I don't know how to go about achieving that and I'm not thrilled
    > about having a heat-producing PC.
    >
    > akiwi


    This is how I keep my prescott cool:

    http://www.ascent.co.nz/mn-product-spec.asp?pid=334974

    and it's all installed in one of these:

    http://www.ascent.co.nz/mn-product-spec.asp?pid=334883

    and yes, I bought them all from Ascent.

    Mackin
     
    Mackin, Apr 29, 2005
    #12
  13. akiwi

    Mercury Guest

    If you want a quiet system then the right place to start is with quiet
    parts. If you try to quiet a system after the fact you'll never get far.

    To this end the AMD 64 Winchester CPU's are your best shot currently - the
    3500+ built with 90nm technology is at the sweet spot for price /
    performance and has a lower power requirement than Intel. With Cool N Quiet,
    the CPU will throttle back during idle to low power levels. It is common for
    CPU fans to stop on these systems when idle.

    There are plenty of vendors of AMD 64 ready motherboards. Just be aware that
    if you want to upgrade to dual core that the board you get will need a bios
    upgrade. Some mobo manufacturers are slack on this front and will release
    new product instead of fixing a bios. If you want AMD dual core in the
    future or the option, then do the sums for the PSU now. Intel dual core is
    up in the air. They have "released" CPU's but when will they materialise?
    The initial chips are No 8 fencing wire hook ups of 2 P4 chips and have
    thoroughly disgusting heat dissipation. You'll need something loud and
    serious to cool them. Not viable IMHO.

    With a 32 bit OS, 64bit CPU's do romp along - all the extra registers in the
    CPU help as does the considerable memory bandiwdth. Benchmarks for the
    Athlon 64 have persistently shown it to outperform Intels current offerings.
    The latest chips even come with SSE3 extensions, so Intel's last claim of a
    performance advantage has been lost.

    Download and read any manual for the motherboard you pick prior to purchase
    to ensure you know the requirements for memory etc. These systems do need
    sticks in pairs, the sticks do need to be compatible (ideally same make,
    model / specs). You are best getting 2 x sticks of the size you want rather
    than adding more later as it is common for the ram to run at lower speeds
    when 4 or more sticks are in use.

    Google for comparisons /reviews - there are a lot out there. Try
    www.anandtech.com or www.tomshardware.com for starters.

    The seagate drives are nice n quiet as is the general trend.

    Next: PSU depending on what graphics card and overall power requirements
    are, a fanless PSU such as a Zalman will get you closer to your goal, but if
    you have a high spec system 400watts may not be enough. Do the sums and
    check out your proposed full system specs before purchasing.

    Lastly, Graphics card. Well, thats your choice - I always err on the side
    that if its got a fan then its noisy - but its your choice.

    If you really want quiet then consider a Zalman reserator water cooling
    system & hook it into your graphics card.

    BOL. Let us know how you get on. But seriously, currently Intel has nothing
    to offer to beat AMD on price, performance, or heat dissipation.



    "akiwi" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    > Any ideas on how to choose CPU components on Ascent PC Builder with
    > performance roughly the same as the following parts, but with an
    > assurance of a reasonably quiet system. The PSU needs to cope with at
    > least two hard drives and maybe two monitors but there'll probably be
    > just one LCD monitor and drive to start with.
    > http://www.ascent.co.nz/pcbuild.asp
    >
    > Intel D915GUXL motherboard, Socket 775, Pentium 4, 800MHz FSB
    > $238
    >
    > Intel Pentium 4, 3.2 GHz CPU, 800 Mhz FSB, Prescott Socket 478,
    > $414
    >
    > Cooler Master Cavalier 3, ATX Mid Tower Case, 350W PSU, Silver
    > $239
    >
    > Seagate Barracuda 7200.7 ST3160023A, 160 GB, 7,200rpm,
    > $166
    >
    >
    > What advantage or disadvantage is there in getting a 64 bit CPU if you
    > don't run applications that target 64 bit.
    >
    > Also what is the difference between 1GB RAM DDR2 533 and DDR2 333? -
    > any recommendations for a 1GB RAM chip?
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    > akiwi
     
    Mercury, Apr 29, 2005
    #13
  14. akiwi

    Enkidu Guest

    CSE wrote:
    > On 28 Apr 2005 20:51:22 -0700, wrote:
    >
    >
    >>The motherboard you mentioned has dual memory channels, so you need to
    >>install DIMMS in matched pairs for best performance, i.e. two 512MB
    >>DIMMs.

    >
    > They don't have to be Matched, just the same Type..
    >

    Second Roger on this. That said, some chips do not work well
    together. I usually try to buy two together. Sell the single
    on trademe!

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    Barzoomian the Martian - http://barzoomian.blogspot.com
     
    Enkidu, Apr 29, 2005
    #14
  15. akiwi

    akiwi Guest

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 19:24:23 +1200, "Mercury" <> wrote:

    >If you want a quiet system then the right place to start is with quiet
    >parts. If you try to quiet a system after the fact you'll never get far.
    >
    >To this end the AMD 64 Winchester CPU's are your best shot currently - the
    >3500+ built with 90nm technology is at the sweet spot for price /
    >performance and has a lower power requirement than Intel. With Cool N Quiet,
    >the CPU will throttle back during idle to low power levels. It is common for
    >CPU fans to stop on these systems when idle.
    >
    >There are plenty of vendors of AMD 64 ready motherboards. Just be aware that
    >if you want to upgrade to dual core that the board you get will need a bios
    >upgrade. Some mobo manufacturers are slack on this front and will release
    >new product instead of fixing a bios. If you want AMD dual core in the
    >future or the option, then do the sums for the PSU now. Intel dual core is
    >up in the air. They have "released" CPU's but when will they materialise?
    >The initial chips are No 8 fencing wire hook ups of 2 P4 chips and have
    >thoroughly disgusting heat dissipation. You'll need something loud and
    >serious to cool them. Not viable IMHO.
    >
    >With a 32 bit OS, 64bit CPU's do romp along - all the extra registers in the
    >CPU help as does the considerable memory bandiwdth. Benchmarks for the
    >Athlon 64 have persistently shown it to outperform Intels current offerings.
    >The latest chips even come with SSE3 extensions, so Intel's last claim of a
    >performance advantage has been lost.
    >
    >Download and read any manual for the motherboard you pick prior to purchase
    >to ensure you know the requirements for memory etc. These systems do need
    >sticks in pairs, the sticks do need to be compatible (ideally same make,
    >model / specs). You are best getting 2 x sticks of the size you want rather
    >than adding more later as it is common for the ram to run at lower speeds
    >when 4 or more sticks are in use.
    >
    >Google for comparisons /reviews - there are a lot out there. Try
    >www.anandtech.com or www.tomshardware.com for starters.
    >
    >The seagate drives are nice n quiet as is the general trend.
    >
    >Next: PSU depending on what graphics card and overall power requirements
    >are, a fanless PSU such as a Zalman will get you closer to your goal, but if
    >you have a high spec system 400watts may not be enough. Do the sums and
    >check out your proposed full system specs before purchasing.
    >
    >Lastly, Graphics card. Well, thats your choice - I always err on the side
    >that if its got a fan then its noisy - but its your choice.
    >
    >If you really want quiet then consider a Zalman reserator water cooling
    >system & hook it into your graphics card.
    >
    >BOL. Let us know how you get on. But seriously, currently Intel has nothing
    >to offer to beat AMD on price, performance, or heat dissipation.
    >


    Thanks, that was a big help. According to this web page
    http://techreport.com/reviews/2005q2/opteron-x75/index.x?pg=1

    you need a socket 940 board (athlon is socket 939) supporting 90nm
    chips to fit a dual core Opteron. On Ascent there's very few single
    socket 940 motherbds and none that support dual core chips AFAICS.

    Dual core or dual socket looks a bit expensive for now. The second to
    last page on that website above seems to show that Opteron uses more
    power idling than under load, or else I misunderstand.

    The Athlon 3500 chip you mention looks like a good choice with just
    about any motherboard. I think I'm going to want 2GB of RAM
    eventually so I guess I need 2 1GB straight away. Unfortunately I
    need a graphics card to get DVI for an LCD monitor.

    Thanks
    akiwi
     
    akiwi, Apr 29, 2005
    #15
  16. akiwi

    akiwi Guest

    akiwi, Apr 29, 2005
    #16
  17. akiwi

    Mercury Guest

    DVI is a non issue - nearly all recent cards have DVI.

    Dual core != Dual CPU. In a few months AMD will release the X2 series of
    dual core CPU's. This is 2 CPU's in 1 chip. It is not 2 CPU's side by side
    hobbled together as in Intel's smithfield technology, it is the rael
    macoy... Nor am I meaning Dual CPU (2 sockets) on the motherboard.

    I suggest reading more reviews. The AMD 64's that use 90nm technology
    (Winchester) use very little juice when idle compared to the competition.
    The stats must have been around the wrong way or perhaps the decimal point
    was in the wrong place (I have read 14watts idle, 65 busy, Intel P4 Prescott
    uses more than 65 idle). ** idle temp is not the only consideration. If you
    run games etc. that are CPU intense, then the CPU will work and will need
    good cooling - 65 watts is still 65 watts.

    Opteron 200 series CPU's are for dual socket mobos. The dual core chips for
    these are out, a tad expensive, but you end up with 4 processors in 1 system
    (IE 2x2). They are 940 pin. Opterons also come in 1xx series... The AMD FX
    series are out of most peoples budgets... but have performance to envy.

    The coming X2 chips are the dual core successors to the current AMD 64 bit
    chips such as the 3500+. This is why I advise these chips currently - there
    is already an excellent upgrade path committed to (IE 2x straight off).
    These are 939 pin. There are several really good boards with either AGP or
    PCIe graphics slots and the top end workstation SLI boards - 2 PCIe graphics
    cards working together (big noise). This is where the fun will be.

    A dual core chip will be little use unless you either run a lot of stuff
    concurrently, run multithreaded apps (some games), or have deep pockets. The
    current pricing has been described as 2.5x a single core, but that is
    expected to start falling in several weeks.

    If you are a power user or want the option open for dual core chips then
    make sure you get a 939pin mobo, get one from a vendor reputed for keeping
    bios up to date or one that has stated commitment to supporting them. Asus
    A8N and A8V boards come to mind. I believe that MSI and DFI along with
    others will too (check). Gigabyte has already failed to show commitment
    although it could fix this.

    If you get the right 939 pin mobo now, it will cost no more for this future
    proofing. This is why I recommend it.

    If I bought now I would get an Asus A8N-E (don't know where to get an A8N-E
    in NZ yet) and an AMD 3500+ with the view to getting an X2 chip when the
    prices come down. I too like quiet systems... The A8N-E does not have SLI -
    I don't need it so should be a lot cheaper. A Zalman 400w PSU would not be
    suited to an A8N-SLI due to power requirements, but may be OK for an A8N-E.








    "akiwi" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 19:24:23 +1200, "Mercury" <> wrote:
    >
    >>If you want a quiet system then the right place to start is with quiet
    >>parts. If you try to quiet a system after the fact you'll never get far.
    >>
    >>To this end the AMD 64 Winchester CPU's are your best shot currently - the
    >>3500+ built with 90nm technology is at the sweet spot for price /
    >>performance and has a lower power requirement than Intel. With Cool N
    >>Quiet,
    >>the CPU will throttle back during idle to low power levels. It is common
    >>for
    >>CPU fans to stop on these systems when idle.
    >>
    >>There are plenty of vendors of AMD 64 ready motherboards. Just be aware
    >>that
    >>if you want to upgrade to dual core that the board you get will need a
    >>bios
    >>upgrade. Some mobo manufacturers are slack on this front and will release
    >>new product instead of fixing a bios. If you want AMD dual core in the
    >>future or the option, then do the sums for the PSU now. Intel dual core is
    >>up in the air. They have "released" CPU's but when will they materialise?
    >>The initial chips are No 8 fencing wire hook ups of 2 P4 chips and have
    >>thoroughly disgusting heat dissipation. You'll need something loud and
    >>serious to cool them. Not viable IMHO.
    >>
    >>With a 32 bit OS, 64bit CPU's do romp along - all the extra registers in
    >>the
    >>CPU help as does the considerable memory bandiwdth. Benchmarks for the
    >>Athlon 64 have persistently shown it to outperform Intels current
    >>offerings.
    >>The latest chips even come with SSE3 extensions, so Intel's last claim of
    >>a
    >>performance advantage has been lost.
    >>
    >>Download and read any manual for the motherboard you pick prior to
    >>purchase
    >>to ensure you know the requirements for memory etc. These systems do need
    >>sticks in pairs, the sticks do need to be compatible (ideally same make,
    >>model / specs). You are best getting 2 x sticks of the size you want
    >>rather
    >>than adding more later as it is common for the ram to run at lower speeds
    >>when 4 or more sticks are in use.
    >>
    >>Google for comparisons /reviews - there are a lot out there. Try
    >>www.anandtech.com or www.tomshardware.com for starters.
    >>
    >>The seagate drives are nice n quiet as is the general trend.
    >>
    >>Next: PSU depending on what graphics card and overall power requirements
    >>are, a fanless PSU such as a Zalman will get you closer to your goal, but
    >>if
    >>you have a high spec system 400watts may not be enough. Do the sums and
    >>check out your proposed full system specs before purchasing.
    >>
    >>Lastly, Graphics card. Well, thats your choice - I always err on the side
    >>that if its got a fan then its noisy - but its your choice.
    >>
    >>If you really want quiet then consider a Zalman reserator water cooling
    >>system & hook it into your graphics card.
    >>
    >>BOL. Let us know how you get on. But seriously, currently Intel has
    >>nothing
    >>to offer to beat AMD on price, performance, or heat dissipation.
    >>

    >
    > Thanks, that was a big help. According to this web page
    > http://techreport.com/reviews/2005q2/opteron-x75/index.x?pg=1
    >
    > you need a socket 940 board (athlon is socket 939) supporting 90nm
    > chips to fit a dual core Opteron. On Ascent there's very few single
    > socket 940 motherbds and none that support dual core chips AFAICS.
    >
    > Dual core or dual socket looks a bit expensive for now. The second to
    > last page on that website above seems to show that Opteron uses more
    > power idling than under load, or else I misunderstand.
    >
    > The Athlon 3500 chip you mention looks like a good choice with just
    > about any motherboard. I think I'm going to want 2GB of RAM
    > eventually so I guess I need 2 1GB straight away. Unfortunately I
    > need a graphics card to get DVI for an LCD monitor.
    >
    > Thanks
    > akiwi
     
    Mercury, Apr 29, 2005
    #17
  18. akiwi

    Impossible Guest

    "Mackin" <> wrote in message
    news:wOkce.2153$...
    >>
    >> Well I've found out how to get cool and quiet Prescott here
    >> http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/article/1742/
    >>
    >> but I don't know how to go about achieving that and I'm not
    >> thrilled
    >> about having a heat-producing PC.
    >>
    >> akiwi

    >
    > This is how I keep my prescott cool:
    >
    > http://www.ascent.co.nz/mn-product-spec.asp?pid=334974
    >


    That will be the sort of piece that ends up in museums one day, where
    people pass by and laugh about the ridiculous radiator-like
    contraptions you had to bolt onto cpus way back when. As good an
    argument to avoid the Prescott's as I can imagine.
     
    Impossible, Apr 29, 2005
    #18
  19. On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 15:14:32 +1200, "Dave - Dave.net.nz"
    <> wrote:

    >akiwi wrote:
    >> Any ideas on how to choose CPU components on Ascent PC Builder with
    >> performance roughly the same as the following parts, but with an
    >> assurance of a reasonably quiet system. The PSU needs to cope with at
    >> least two hard drives and maybe two monitors but there'll probably be
    >> just one LCD monitor and drive to start with.
    >> http://www.ascent.co.nz/pcbuild.asp

    >
    >The PSU no longer powers the LCD/monitor, and hasn't for quite a while.


    In fact it never did at all
    The power went through the power switch and thats all
     
    FreedomChooser, Apr 30, 2005
    #19
  20. On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 17:37:00 +1200, akiwi <> wrote:

    >On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 15:08:06 +1200, akiwi <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>Any ideas on how to choose CPU components on Ascent PC Builder with
    >>performance roughly the same as the following parts, but with an
    >>assurance of a reasonably quiet system. The PSU needs to cope with at
    >>least two hard drives and maybe two monitors but there'll probably be
    >>just one LCD monitor and drive to start with.
    >>http://www.ascent.co.nz/pcbuild.asp
    >>
    >>Intel D915GUXL motherboard, Socket 775, Pentium 4, 800MHz FSB
    >>$238
    >>
    >>Intel Pentium 4, 3.2 GHz CPU, 800 Mhz FSB, Prescott Socket 478,
    >>$414
    >>
    >>Cooler Master Cavalier 3, ATX Mid Tower Case, 350W PSU, Silver
    >>$239

    >
    >
    >It seems the Prescott is a hot-running CPU and the Cavalier cooling is
    >only adequate and not exceptional (actually described as inadequate in
    >one review on the Cavalier 1) but is exceptionally quiet. Any ideas
    >for a cooler CPU with similar performance as P4 3.2 and/or a quiet but
    >well performing cooling system?


    Recent case designes have an air duct directly over the CPU out of the
    top/side of the case

    Was looking at a low profile case the other day, the CPU temp was 44
    on a Celeron 2.66
     
    FreedomChooser, Apr 30, 2005
    #20
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