Checksum error ?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Fastmoggy, Jan 29, 2009.

  1. Fastmoggy

    Fastmoggy Guest

    Booted up the computer this morning and within a couple of minutes,froze, so
    just restated it without a second thought like you do.
    On restart the whole thing froze before POST so removed battery from CMOS,
    replaced it then she fired up :) on the post i noticed the line 'checksum
    error defaults loaded'

    So just out of intreast, what could this refere to?

    Memory checked out ok in POST so not that?

    It did same thing a few minutes later whilst i was in bios so i changed the
    memory modules and she then fired up again!
    This time i updated the bios and so far seems fine so would that error
    actually be a memory problem?

    Tec info

    Motherboard GIGABYTE ga-945pl-s3

    Windows XP pro ( not that the system had boioted that far)

    I Gig memory 'interleaved'

    Bios now F6 from F2 so bit dated!

    The other thing is that the memory im now using has/had a known fault with
    over heating after a few minutes but so far after 3 hours it's still
    working.
     
    Fastmoggy, Jan 29, 2009
    #1
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  2. Fastmoggy

    Fastmoggy Guest

    "Brian Cryer" <not.here@localhost> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Fastmoggy" <> wrote in message
    > news:Zhfgl.16519$2...
    >> Booted up the computer this morning and within a couple of minutes,froze,
    >> so just restated it without a second thought like you do.
    >> On restart the whole thing froze before POST so removed battery from
    >> CMOS, replaced it then she fired up :) on the post i noticed the line
    >> 'checksum error defaults loaded'
    >>
    >> So just out of intreast, what could this refere to?

    >
    > The checksum it is referring to is a checksum generated from all the bios
    > settings. Its a check that the settings are not corrupt in some way. If
    > you removed the battery then you lost your settings, hence when it started
    > up the checksum was wrong - it shouldn't be next time provided you keep
    > the battery in and the battery doesn't run down.
    >
    > Normally a checksum error is a warning that the battery needs replacing.
    > In your case (because you know you removed and I assume replaced the
    > battery) you can ignore the error.
    >
    > Hope this helps
    > --
    > Brian Cryer
    > www.cryer.co.uk/brian



    Thanks and yes it does.

    I havn't replaced the battery yet as it seemed ok on a test meter. Mind you
    the mother board is from 2006 so the battery may be slightly older so the
    question i'll ask is........
    how long does a lithium battery last for? i thought about 10 years max but i
    know i may be wrong!
    cheers

    PS. Anyone tried to fix the Xbox360?
    Just took the heatsink off after ignoring the fix manual to 'unscrew' the 4
    screws. Appears to 'clip on' under tension
    Anyone else had experience of trying to fix the old ring of death?
     
    Fastmoggy, Jan 29, 2009
    #2
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  3. Fastmoggy

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    Fastmoggy wrote:
    > "Brian Cryer" <not.here@localhost> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> "Fastmoggy" <> wrote in message
    >> news:Zhfgl.16519$2...
    >>> Booted up the computer this morning and within a couple of minutes,froze,
    >>> so just restated it without a second thought like you do.
    >>> On restart the whole thing froze before POST so removed battery from
    >>> CMOS, replaced it then she fired up :) on the post i noticed the line
    >>> 'checksum error defaults loaded'
    >>>
    >>> So just out of intreast, what could this refere to?

    >> The checksum it is referring to is a checksum generated from all the bios
    >> settings. Its a check that the settings are not corrupt in some way. If
    >> you removed the battery then you lost your settings, hence when it started
    >> up the checksum was wrong - it shouldn't be next time provided you keep
    >> the battery in and the battery doesn't run down.
    >>
    >> Normally a checksum error is a warning that the battery needs replacing.
    >> In your case (because you know you removed and I assume replaced the
    >> battery) you can ignore the error.
    >>
    >> Hope this helps
    >> --
    >> Brian Cryer
    >> www.cryer.co.uk/brian

    >
    >
    > Thanks and yes it does.
    >
    > I havn't replaced the battery yet as it seemed ok on a test meter. Mind you
    > the mother board is from 2006 so the battery may be slightly older so the
    > question i'll ask is........
    > how long does a lithium battery last for? i thought about 10 years max but i
    > know i may be wrong!
    > cheers

    A multimeter won't really help in this instance and I'm not going to
    waste time to explain why to someone who is surprised that they get a
    CMOS checksum error after they removed the battery :)

    Buy a new battery and install it making sure you do not handle it as
    grease and moisture from your fingers if it bridges the +ve & -ve
    terminals will drain the battery quite quickly.


    > PS. Anyone tried to fix the Xbox360?
    > Just took the heatsink off after ignoring the fix manual to 'unscrew' the 4
    > screws. Appears to 'clip on' under tension
    > Anyone else had experience of trying to fix the old ring of death?


    You should start a new thread for a new question but try googling xbox
    ring of death fix. There is loads of information out there about this
    very common problem.
     
    Desk Rabbit, Jan 29, 2009
    #3
  4. Fastmoggy

    pimpom Guest

    Fastmoggy wrote:
    > "Brian Cryer" <not.here@localhost> wrote in message
    >
    >
    > I havn't replaced the battery yet as it seemed ok on a test
    > meter.
    > Mind you the mother board is from 2006 so the battery may be
    > slightly
    > older so the question i'll ask is........
    > how long does a lithium battery last for? i thought about 10
    > years
    > max but i know i may be wrong!
    > cheers
    >

    I've seen CMOS batteries that needed replacing after 3 years
    (less than 2V and causing problems) and some that were still
    going after 5 years. I think 10 yrs would be well outside a
    typical lifespan.

    When I work on other people's computers, I generally replace the
    battery if its unloaded voltage is 2.8V or lower. They're cheap
    after all. I just got a new batch for the equivalent of 11 US
    cents each. Local computer shops sell them for up to $1 each
    though.
     
    pimpom, Jan 29, 2009
    #4
  5. Fastmoggy

    Guest

    On Jan 29, 6:01 am, "Fastmoggy" <> wrote:
    > I havn't replaced the battery yet as it seemed ok on a test meter. Mind you
    > the mother board is from 2006 so the battery may be slightly older so the
    > question i'll ask is........
    > how long does a lithium battery last for? i thought about 10 years max but i
    > know i may be wrong!


    Battery test is best performed not removed. Your post is
    subjective. It provided no numbers so nobody knows if that battery is
    OK. Another demonstrated how numbers are important. He replaces a
    3.0 volt battery at 2.8 volts. That means the battery was good for
    at least another six months but he replaced it now - as recommended.

    Lithium batteries should last five years. Some motherboards that
    contain a defect may discharge that battery faster. Once saw a
    motherboard discharge the battery every six months. How did we know?
    Numbers from the multimeter.

    Computer froze, so you started replacing things? Do that to make a
    solution difficult or impossible. First collect facts. Instead, you
    speculated and then replaced something. Now the problem has been made
    more complicated even by the resulting CMOS checksum error and lost
    CMOS information. Long before fixing anything, first get facts. That
    even means measuring battery voltage without removing the battery.
     
    , Jan 30, 2009
    #5
  6. Fastmoggy

    Fastmoggy Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Jan 29, 6:01 am, "Fastmoggy" <> wrote:
    > I havn't replaced the battery yet as it seemed ok on a test meter. Mind
    > you
    > the mother board is from 2006 so the battery may be slightly older so the
    > question i'll ask is........
    > how long does a lithium battery last for? i thought about 10 years max but
    > i
    > know i may be wrong!


    Battery test is best performed not removed. Your post is
    subjective. It provided no numbers so nobody knows if that battery is
    OK. Another demonstrated how numbers are important. He replaces a
    3.0 volt battery at 2.8 volts. That means the battery was good for
    at least another six months but he replaced it now - as recommended.

    Lithium batteries should last five years. Some motherboards that
    contain a defect may discharge that battery faster. Once saw a
    motherboard discharge the battery every six months. How did we know?
    Numbers from the multimeter.

    Computer froze, so you started replacing things? Do that to make a
    solution difficult or impossible. First collect facts. Instead, you
    speculated and then replaced something. Now the problem has been made
    more complicated even by the resulting CMOS checksum error and lost
    CMOS information. Long before fixing anything, first get facts. That
    even means measuring battery voltage without removing the battery.

    Mmmmmmmm
    battery tested under load and results were fine.2.97V and 3.2 idle.

    The problem was/is the memory sticks i had 2x 512 units

    Since the problem surfaced and units replaced all is well and even better
    than before!

    At the time i wasn't 100% sure why i got the error so i was just asking if
    anyone had an idea as to what it may have been.

    The funny thing is that since then a new thread has been created to amuse
    certain people who think that 'support helpdesk' is a platform to take the
    piss which i think puts some people off from seeking help from 'them who
    know'
    I have recently posted a few post regarding my systems unstalibility as i
    was puzzed at problems i was getting but the end result was just memory
    probelms which i didn't see and was, in hindsight, was hoping the more
    technical in here who know could have pointed out.
    There is a saying..you cannot see the woods for the trees and i guess we
    have all had that experiance at some point.

    All i can say is a BIG THANKYOU to the few who gave me the info i was
    looking for to confirm my suspicions.

    Just to finish off the battery question was asked because i have a ham radio
    which uses a lithium battery to retain memory. I bought the radio in 1992
    and it still works. I know the radio isn't switched on for long periods but
    it is powered down for longer periods thus needing the battery to retain
    memory.
     
    Fastmoggy, Jan 30, 2009
    #6
  7. Fastmoggy

    Guest

    On Jan 30, 5:24 pm, "Fastmoggy" <> wrote:
    > The problem was/is the memory sticks i had 2x 512 units
    > Since the problem surfaced and units replaced all is well and even better
    > than before!
    > At the time i wasn't 100% sure why i got the error so i was just asking if
    > anyone had an idea as to what it may have been.
    > ...
    > I have recently posted a few post regarding my systems unstalibility as i
    > was puzzed at problems i was getting but the end result was just memory
    > probelms which i didn't see and was, in hindsight, was hoping the more
    > technical in here who know could have pointed out.


    Numbers say battery clearly was not the problem. Just changing
    memory computer booting does not indicate memory problem? Defective
    menory could have been identified by two methods.

    First and most productive method is to use a memory diagnostic that
    does not use (load) Windows. Better computer manufacturers provide
    that free diagnostic with the system. Then repeat that diagnostic
    using heat. For example, a hairdyer on highest heat setting can make
    defective memory finally start failing during the diagnostic. Or
    selectively heating the other associated semiconductors may trace the
    problem there.

    Second indication might be swapping memory boards. Very little of
    memory can cause a boot crash. Swapping memory would move memory to a
    location where memory failure would be recoded in the system (event)
    logs. A task would crash - not a booting OS.

    Swapping memory can temporarily aleviate some reasons for that
    failure. Heat is a far more reliable tool that often makes
    intermittent failures hard enough for a memory diagnostic to find it
    every time.

    Returning to the battery. Some CMOS semiconductors are manufactured
    with excessive leakage A defect that may cause a lithium battery to
    discharge prematurely is also leakage so low as to not be detected in
    manufacturing. Discharge on the lithium battery must be so low that
    internal discharge (also called shelf life) determines a battery's
    life expectancy. Life expectancy number should be something beyond
    five years (some claim ten) if CMOS semiconductors have proper (low)
    leakage.
     
    , Jan 31, 2009
    #7
  8. Fastmoggy

    pimpom Guest

    wrote:
    >
    > First and most productive method is to use a memory
    > diagnostic that
    > does not use (load) Windows. Better computer manufacturers
    > provide
    > that free diagnostic with the system. Then repeat that
    > diagnostic
    > using heat. For example, a hairdyer on highest heat setting
    > can make
    > defective memory finally start failing during the diagnostic.
    > Or
    > selectively heating the other associated semiconductors may
    > trace the
    > problem there.
    >

    As a matter of interest, I once encountered a memory stick that
    prevented a computer from booting up unless it had warmed up
    first. After narrowing down the possibilities, I confirmed it by
    blowing on the stick with a hair dryer at low heat for a couple
    of seconds before turning the computer on. It always booted after
    such a treatment and then ran without any problem. But I replaced
    the stick anyway.

    I had a similar experience as an electronics tech a long time ago
    involving a cordless telephone. The controller IC in the base
    unit wouldn't work at room temperature, so I connected a resistor
    to the 12V supply and glued it on to the IC, choosing a resistor
    value and wattage that would heat up significantly but not
    overheat. It worked for years until the owner broke the handset
    and finally discarded the set.
     
    pimpom, Jan 31, 2009
    #8
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