Checking photos on DVDs

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by MikeM, Jul 22, 2006.

  1. MikeM

    MikeM Guest

    Is there any software that can check actual image files for damage, as
    opposed to the disk surface, on DVDs without looking at each one
    individually on the monitor?

    Thanks
    Mike
     
    MikeM, Jul 22, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. There might be. I can tell you that if you zip them up they will take a bit
    less space and you can extract them occasionally to see if it does the bit
    check right.

    More technically oriented people will pass by soon with more details.

    --
    Thanks,
    Gene Palmiter
    (visit my photo gallery at http://palmiter.dotphoto.com)
    freebridge design group

    "MikeM" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Is there any software that can check actual image files for damage, as
    > opposed to the disk surface, on DVDs without looking at each one
    > individually on the monitor?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Mike
     
    Gene Palmiter, Jul 22, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. MikeM

    Jürgen Eidt Guest

    "MikeM" <> schrieb
    > Is there any software that can check actual image files for damage, as
    > opposed to the disk surface, on DVDs without looking at each one
    > individually on the monitor?


    Would this work for you? :
    http://jurgene.spaces.msn.com/blog/cns!ECF9470581AA39EA!205.entry
     
    Jürgen Eidt, Jul 22, 2006
    #3
  4. MikeM

    Daryl Bryant Guest

    I just use Nero burning software. Has an option to verify data quality!
    Remember Never write or attach stickers to the back side of your DVD or
    CD-ROMS. Because the backing material is where the data is written - thru
    the clear plastic to the metallic material!!!

    --
    There are no words that can be heard unless someone listens....
    "MikeM" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Is there any software that can check actual image files for damage, as
    > opposed to the disk surface, on DVDs without looking at each one
    > individually on the monitor?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Mike
     
    Daryl Bryant, Jul 22, 2006
    #4
  5. MikeM

    Shawn Hirn Guest

    In article <>,
    MikeM <> wrote:

    > Is there any software that can check actual image files for damage, as
    > opposed to the disk surface, on DVDs without looking at each one
    > individually on the monitor?


    Just select all the photos and copy them to your hard disk, then delete
    them ... assuming you have the space. Odds are high that any corrupt
    files simply will elicit an error when the copy process attempts to
    access them. Or run a disk checking program against the DVD.
     
    Shawn Hirn, Jul 22, 2006
    #5
  6. MikeM

    trivial guy Guest

    In article <>,
    MikeM <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >Is there any software that can check actual image files for damage, as
    >opposed to the disk surface, on DVDs without looking at each one
    >individually on the monitor?


    You can create PAR files, which can also recover damaged files
    (to a degree):

    http://www.quickpar.org.uk/
     
    trivial guy, Jul 22, 2006
    #6
  7. MikeM

    l v Guest

    MikeM wrote:
    > Is there any software that can check actual image files for damage, as
    > opposed to the disk surface, on DVDs without looking at each one
    > individually on the monitor?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Mike


    The only automated option that I can think of would be to calculate a
    MD5 checksum for each file on your DVDs and store those "master"
    checksums in different location(s). You can then validate your DVDs by
    recalculating the checksum and comparing with the "master".

    This is common with software downloads where you compare your checksum
    with the "master" checksum from the supplier.

    I have not used the following ( http://www.irnis.net/ ) but one of their
    products does sound like what you are looking for.

    --

    Len
     
    l v, Jul 23, 2006
    #7
  8. MikeM

    Guest

    MikeM wrote:
    > Is there any software that can check actual image files for damage, as
    > opposed to the disk surface, on DVDs without looking at each one
    > individually on the monitor?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Mike


    This is generally not much of a problem. The file structure has error
    checking codes. If the write operation during transfer from your card
    or hard drive is bad, the transfer should stop and notify you
    immediately.
     
    , Jul 23, 2006
    #8
  9. MikeM

    RPN Guest

    MikeM wrote:
    > Is there any software that can check actual image files for damage, as
    > opposed to the disk surface, on DVDs without looking at each one
    > individually on the monitor?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Mike


    What I do is place all the files that are going on the DVD in directory
    "A", make the DVD, and then copy all the files from the newly created
    DVD into directory "B".

    I then use CloneSpy (http://www.clonespy.com) to compare "A" to "B" and
    delete all duplicate files found in "B". If the files in "B" are all
    deleted, I figure I have a good copy.

    If space is at a premium, you could compare directly to the DVD and
    delete from "A", but that makes me a little nervous. I like to have the
    originals around until I am sure all is OK and backed up on two DVDs
    that have passed the test.
     
    RPN, Jul 24, 2006
    #9
  10. MikeM

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Fri, 21 Jul 2006 23:54:47 -0700, "Daryl Bryant"
    <> wrote:

    >I just use Nero burning software. Has an option to verify data quality!
    >Remember Never write or attach stickers to the back side of your DVD or
    >CD-ROMS. Because the backing material is where the data is written - thru
    >the clear plastic to the metallic material!!!


    Not true for DVDs. They do have an extra layer on the back, and that's
    really because of the problem with CDs and their susceptibility to
    damage on the back.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, Jul 25, 2006
    #10
  11. MikeM

    Daryl Bryant Guest

    "Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 21 Jul 2006 23:54:47 -0700, "Daryl Bryant"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >I just use Nero burning software. Has an option to verify data quality!
    > >Remember Never write or attach stickers to the back side of your DVD or
    > >CD-ROMS. Because the backing material is where the data is written - thru
    > >the clear plastic to the metallic material!!!

    >
    > Not true for DVDs. They do have an extra layer on the back, and that's
    > really because of the problem with CDs and their susceptibility to
    > damage on the back.


    Wouldn't that be double sided DVD's i.e. they perhaps are written to the
    center of the disk?
     
    Daryl Bryant, Jul 25, 2006
    #11
  12. MikeM

    Neil Maxwell Guest

    On Tue, 25 Jul 2006 12:43:52 -0700, Bill Funk <>
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 21 Jul 2006 23:54:47 -0700, "Daryl Bryant"
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>I just use Nero burning software. Has an option to verify data quality!
    >>Remember Never write or attach stickers to the back side of your DVD or
    >>CD-ROMS. Because the backing material is where the data is written - thru
    >>the clear plastic to the metallic material!!!

    >
    >Not true for DVDs. They do have an extra layer on the back, and that's
    >really because of the problem with CDs and their susceptibility to
    >damage on the back.


    This is true. There is a possibility that a sticker/label on a DVD
    can cause stress on the polycarbonate on one side (due to glue
    shrinkage, uneven application, whatever), which can result in
    delamination. I haven't had this happen to me, but there have been a
    few reports of it.

    This is also why DVD cases have a different disk release mechanism -
    the "press-to-unlock" center hub - because the old CD style "lift the
    edge while pushing down on the center" release mechanism, which bends
    the disk, was causing the two polycarbonate layers to delaminate.


    --
    Neil Maxwell - I don't speak for my employer
     
    Neil Maxwell, Jul 26, 2006
    #12
  13. MikeM

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Tue, 25 Jul 2006 13:52:05 -0700, "Daryl Bryant"
    <> wrote:

    >"Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Fri, 21 Jul 2006 23:54:47 -0700, "Daryl Bryant"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >I just use Nero burning software. Has an option to verify data quality!
    >> >Remember Never write or attach stickers to the back side of your DVD or
    >> >CD-ROMS. Because the backing material is where the data is written - thru
    >> >the clear plastic to the metallic material!!!

    >>
    >> Not true for DVDs. They do have an extra layer on the back, and that's
    >> really because of the problem with CDs and their susceptibility to
    >> damage on the back.

    >
    >Wouldn't that be double sided DVD's i.e. they perhaps are written to the
    >center of the disk?
    >


    Double-sided DVDs are different; they have a recording layer on each
    side.
    Single- and double-layer DVDs (which the vast majority of DVDs are)
    are burned from the same side, and have an extra layer on the top
    (non-burning) side that CDs don't have.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, Jul 26, 2006
    #13
  14. MikeM

    ASAAR Guest

    On Wed, 26 Jul 2006 12:25:51 -0700, Bill Funk wrote:

    > Single- and double-layer DVDs (which the vast majority of DVDs are)
    > are burned from the same side, and have an extra layer on the top
    > (non-burning) side that CDs don't have.


    With the exception of LightScribe discs, where both sides are
    "burnable", even the CDs :)
     
    ASAAR, Jul 27, 2006
    #14
  15. MikeM

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Wed, 26 Jul 2006 20:05:09 -0400, ASAAR <> wrote:

    >On Wed, 26 Jul 2006 12:25:51 -0700, Bill Funk wrote:
    >
    >> Single- and double-layer DVDs (which the vast majority of DVDs are)
    >> are burned from the same side, and have an extra layer on the top
    >> (non-burning) side that CDs don't have.

    >
    > With the exception of LightScribe discs, where both sides are
    >"burnable", even the CDs :)


    Well, yeah, but I don't use LightScribe, no one I know does, so it's
    pretty much below my radar.
    I see LightScribe as a 'gimmick", myself. I also understand that there
    may be a color lightscribe sometime soon. Whoopie. I can use printable
    CDs and DVDs, and get a much better label for far less time and
    expense.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, Jul 27, 2006
    #15
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. fkissam

    Shrinking 9gb DVDs to 4.7gb DVDs

    fkissam, Jan 11, 2004, in forum: DVD Video
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    6,785
  2. Wild Coyote

    Converting PAL DVDs to NTSC DVDs.

    Wild Coyote, Oct 22, 2004, in forum: DVD Video
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    3,329
    Wild Coyote
    Oct 27, 2004
  3. Breezereef

    Reads Data DVDs but not Video DVDs

    Breezereef, Jul 21, 2005, in forum: DVD Video
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    637
    Breezereef
    Jul 22, 2005
  4. Biz
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    845
  5. One4All

    Preventing Rip-Off of My Photos on DVDs

    One4All, Jun 14, 2006, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    39
    Views:
    867
    Mxsmanic
    Jun 27, 2006
Loading...

Share This Page