Check path length in Windows hierarchy?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by KiwiBrian, Oct 5, 2005.

  1. KiwiBrian

    KiwiBrian Guest

    Is there a utility or program that I can point at a top level folder in a
    hierarchy and it will tell me of any files whose total path-length including
    file-name exceeds a predefined figure?
    It appears that Windows allows this situation to be created, thus ensuring
    some unpredictable side-effects, none of them good.
    I have not been able to find any way of checking a current existing
    situation, which seems a bit bizarre.
    TIA
    Brian Tozer
     
    KiwiBrian, Oct 5, 2005
    #1
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  2. KiwiBrian

    Harry Guest

    KiwiBrian wrote:

    > Is there a utility or program that I can point at a top level folder in a
    > hierarchy and it will tell me of any files whose total path-length
    > including file-name exceeds a predefined figure?
    > It appears that Windows allows this situation to be created, thus ensuring
    > some unpredictable side-effects, none of them good.
    > I have not been able to find any way of checking a current existing
    > situation, which seems a bit bizarre.


    find / | awk 'length($0}>255{print $0}'
     
    Harry, Oct 5, 2005
    #2
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  3. KiwiBrian

    KiwiBrian Guest

    "Harry" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > KiwiBrian wrote:
    >
    >> Is there a utility or program that I can point at a top level folder in a
    >> hierarchy and it will tell me of any files whose total path-length
    >> including file-name exceeds a predefined figure?
    >> It appears that Windows allows this situation to be created, thus
    >> ensuring
    >> some unpredictable side-effects, none of them good.
    >> I have not been able to find any way of checking a current existing
    >> situation, which seems a bit bizarre.

    >
    > find / | awk 'length($0}>255{print $0}'


    Thanks Harry.
    What would I have to do to run this on a Windows XP SP2 PC?
    Brian Tozer
     
    KiwiBrian, Oct 5, 2005
    #3
  4. KiwiBrian

    Harry Guest

    KiwiBrian wrote:

    >
    > "Harry" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> KiwiBrian wrote:
    >>
    >>> Is there a utility or program that I can point at a top level folder in
    >>> a hierarchy and it will tell me of any files whose total path-length
    >>> including file-name exceeds a predefined figure?
    >>> It appears that Windows allows this situation to be created, thus
    >>> ensuring
    >>> some unpredictable side-effects, none of them good.
    >>> I have not been able to find any way of checking a current existing
    >>> situation, which seems a bit bizarre.

    >>
    >> find / | awk 'length($0}>255{print $0}'

    >
    > Thanks Harry.
    > What would I have to do to run this on a Windows XP SP2 PC?
    > Brian Tozer


    Install gnu stuff.
    Have a nice day.
     
    Harry, Oct 5, 2005
    #4
  5. KiwiBrian

    Malcolm Guest

    On Thu, 06 Oct 2005 02:32:31 +1300, KiwiBrian wrote:

    >
    > "Harry" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> KiwiBrian wrote:
    >>
    >>> Is there a utility or program that I can point at a top level folder in a
    >>> hierarchy and it will tell me of any files whose total path-length
    >>> including file-name exceeds a predefined figure?
    >>> It appears that Windows allows this situation to be created, thus
    >>> ensuring
    >>> some unpredictable side-effects, none of them good.
    >>> I have not been able to find any way of checking a current existing
    >>> situation, which seems a bit bizarre.

    >>
    >> find / | awk 'length($0}>255{print $0}'

    >
    > Thanks Harry.
    > What would I have to do to run this on a Windows XP SP2 PC?
    > Brian Tozer

    Hi Brian
    I think awk should be available on Windows services for Unix, it's a
    free download here;

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserversystem/sfu/default.mspx

    --
    Cheers
    Malcolm °¿°
     
    Malcolm, Oct 5, 2005
    #5
  6. KiwiBrian

    Alan Guest

    "KiwiBrian" <> wrote in message
    news:dhvckv$ts6$
    > Is there a utility or program that I can point at a top level folder
    > in a hierarchy and it will tell me of any files whose total
    > path-length including file-name exceeds a predefined figure?
    > It appears that Windows allows this situation to be created, thus
    > ensuring some unpredictable side-effects, none of them good.
    > I have not been able to find any way of checking a current existing
    > situation, which seems a bit bizarre.
    > TIA
    > Brian Tozer
    >


    Hi,

    If it was me, I'd just use excel as being quick and simple, but
    obviously you would need to have that available.

    Alan.

    --
    The views expressed are my own, and not those of my employer or anyone
    else associated with me.

    My current valid email address is:



    This is valid as is. It is not munged, or altered at all.

    It will be valid for AT LEAST one month from the date of this post.

    If you are trying to contact me after that time,
    it MAY still be valid, but may also have been
    deactivated due to spam. If so, and you want
    to contact me by email, try searching for a
    more recent post by me to find my current
    email address
     
    Alan, Oct 5, 2005
    #6
  7. KiwiBrian

    Mark C Guest

    "KiwiBrian" <> wrote in
    news:di0kl6$987$:

    >
    > "Harry" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> KiwiBrian wrote:
    >>
    >>> Is there a utility or program that I can point at a top level
    >>> folder in a hierarchy and it will tell me of any files whose
    >>> total path-length including file-name exceeds a predefined
    >>> figure? It appears that Windows allows this situation to be
    >>> created, thus ensuring
    >>> some unpredictable side-effects, none of them good.
    >>> I have not been able to find any way of checking a current
    >>> existing situation, which seems a bit bizarre.

    >>
    >> find / | awk 'length($0}>255{print $0}'

    >
    > Thanks Harry.
    > What would I have to do to run this on a Windows XP SP2 PC?
    > Brian Tozer


    dir /b/s | gawk "length($0}>255{print $0}"

    Get gawk here:
    http://unxutils.sourceforge.net
     
    Mark C, Oct 5, 2005
    #7
  8. KiwiBrian

    KiwiBrian Guest

    "Alan" <> wrote in message
    news:ydX0f.16230$...
    > "KiwiBrian" <> wrote in message
    > news:dhvckv$ts6$
    >> Is there a utility or program that I can point at a top level folder
    >> in a hierarchy and it will tell me of any files whose total
    >> path-length including file-name exceeds a predefined figure?
    >> It appears that Windows allows this situation to be created, thus
    >> ensuring some unpredictable side-effects, none of them good.
    >> I have not been able to find any way of checking a current existing
    >> situation, which seems a bit bizarre.
    >> TIA
    >> Brian Tozer
    >>

    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > If it was me, I'd just use excel as being quick and simple, but
    > obviously you would need to have that available.
    >
    > Alan.


    Hi Alan.
    I have Excel available on the PC under discussion.
    Could you elaborate on exactly how I can use it to achieve my objective?
    TIA
    Yours hopefully.
    Brian
     
    KiwiBrian, Oct 6, 2005
    #8
  9. KiwiBrian

    Alan Guest

    "KiwiBrian" <> wrote in message
    news:di1u3n$lbl$
    > "Alan" <> wrote in message
    > news:ydX0f.16230$...
    >> "KiwiBrian" <> wrote in message
    >> news:dhvckv$ts6$
    >>> Is there a utility or program that I can point at a top level
    >>> folder
    >>> in a hierarchy and it will tell me of any files whose total
    >>> path-length including file-name exceeds a predefined figure?
    >>> It appears that Windows allows this situation to be created, thus
    >>> ensuring some unpredictable side-effects, none of them good.
    >>> I have not been able to find any way of checking a current
    >>> existing
    >>> situation, which seems a bit bizarre.
    >>> TIA
    >>> Brian Tozer
    >>>

    >>
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> If it was me, I'd just use excel as being quick and simple, but
    >> obviously you would need to have that available.
    >>
    >> Alan.

    >
    > Hi Alan.
    > I have Excel available on the PC under discussion.
    > Could you elaborate on exactly how I can use it to achieve my
    > objective? TIA
    > Yours hopefully.
    > Brian


    Hi Brian,

    Open a new workbook, and paste this sub into a new standard module in
    the VB Editor (watch out for wrapping in the news posting):

    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

    Sub IndexFiles()

    ' To use, select cell A1 (say) in an empty worksheet, and run this
    ' code.
    ' When it completes, you should have a full path listing of all files
    ' and folders in the named directory and sub-directories.

    SearchPath = InputBox("Enter the path to search", "Folder?")

    With Application.FileSearch

    .LookIn = SearchPath
    .FileType = msoFileTypeAllFiles
    .SearchSubFolders = True
    .Execute

    End With

    cnt = Application.FileSearch.FoundFiles.Count

    For i = 1 To cnt

    rng = "A" & i

    Range(rng).Value = Application.FileSearch.FoundFiles.Item(i)

    Next i

    End Sub

    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+


    Go to A1 in an empty worksheet and run the macro above.

    Enter a path you want to check such as:

    C:\Temp

    It will list the full path and filename of each file in that directory
    and all sub-directories as text strings in A1 down.

    Bear in mind that a worksheet in excel only has 65536 rows so if you
    do this for a folder with 70,000 files it'll fall over - in that case
    do it for sub-folders one at a time.

    Once you have the file listings, enter a formula in B1 thus:

    =LEN(A1)

    Copy that down as far as the list extends and it will tell you the
    total path length for each file.

    You could then sort by column B in descending order to see the longest
    paths first.


    Post back if you need more detail on any of that.

    HTH,

    Alan.


    --
    The views expressed are my own, and not those of my employer or anyone
    else associated with me.

    My current valid email address is:



    This is valid as is. It is not munged, or altered at all.

    It will be valid for AT LEAST one month from the date of this post.

    If you are trying to contact me after that time,
    it MAY still be valid, but may also have been
    deactivated due to spam. If so, and you want
    to contact me by email, try searching for a
    more recent post by me to find my current
    email address
     
    Alan, Oct 6, 2005
    #9
  10. KiwiBrian

    Harry Guest

    Alan wrote:

    > "KiwiBrian" <> wrote in message
    > news:di1u3n$lbl$
    >> "Alan" <> wrote in message
    >> news:ydX0f.16230$...
    >>> "KiwiBrian" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:dhvckv$ts6$
    >>>> Is there a utility or program that I can point at a top level
    >>>> folder
    >>>> in a hierarchy and it will tell me of any files whose total
    >>>> path-length including file-name exceeds a predefined figure?
    >>>> It appears that Windows allows this situation to be created, thus
    >>>> ensuring some unpredictable side-effects, none of them good.
    >>>> I have not been able to find any way of checking a current
    >>>> existing
    >>>> situation, which seems a bit bizarre.
    >>>> TIA
    >>>> Brian Tozer
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Hi,
    >>>
    >>> If it was me, I'd just use excel as being quick and simple, but
    >>> obviously you would need to have that available.
    >>>
    >>> Alan.

    >>
    >> Hi Alan.
    >> I have Excel available on the PC under discussion.
    >> Could you elaborate on exactly how I can use it to achieve my
    >> objective? TIA
    >> Yours hopefully.
    >> Brian

    >
    > Hi Brian,
    >
    > Open a new workbook, and paste this sub into a new standard module in
    > the VB Editor (watch out for wrapping in the news posting):
    >
    > +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    >
    > Sub IndexFiles()
    >
    > ' To use, select cell A1 (say) in an empty worksheet, and run this
    > ' code.
    > ' When it completes, you should have a full path listing of all files
    > ' and folders in the named directory and sub-directories.
    >
    > SearchPath = InputBox("Enter the path to search", "Folder?")
    >
    > With Application.FileSearch
    >
    > .LookIn = SearchPath
    > .FileType = msoFileTypeAllFiles
    > .SearchSubFolders = True
    > .Execute
    >
    > End With
    >
    > cnt = Application.FileSearch.FoundFiles.Count
    >
    > For i = 1 To cnt
    >
    > rng = "A" & i
    >
    > Range(rng).Value = Application.FileSearch.FoundFiles.Item(i)
    >
    > Next i
    >
    > End Sub
    >
    > +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    >
    >
    > Go to A1 in an empty worksheet and run the macro above.
    >
    > Enter a path you want to check such as:
    >
    > C:\Temp
    >
    > It will list the full path and filename of each file in that directory
    > and all sub-directories as text strings in A1 down.
    >
    > Bear in mind that a worksheet in excel only has 65536 rows so if you
    > do this for a folder with 70,000 files it'll fall over - in that case
    > do it for sub-folders one at a time.
    >
    > Once you have the file listings, enter a formula in B1 thus:
    >
    > =LEN(A1)
    >
    > Copy that down as far as the list extends and it will tell you the
    > total path length for each file.
    >
    > You could then sort by column B in descending order to see the longest
    > paths first.
    >
    >
    > Post back if you need more detail on any of that.
    >


    Gee that is really simple. Clever of MS to provide such a powerful
    and user-friendly tool! So simple!

    BTW you can get a copy of gawk.exe, on its own, from nearly everywhere
    on the internet. You could also do the same thing with perl.exe, viz:

    dir /b/s | perl -ne 'print $_ if length($_) > 255;'

    Doing it in excel is lame.
     
    Harry, Oct 6, 2005
    #10
  11. KiwiBrian

    Alan Guest

    "Harry" <> wrote in message
    news:
    >
    > Gee that is really simple. Clever of MS to provide such a powerful
    > and user-friendly tool! So simple!
    >


    Indeed - I totally agree.

    In my opinion Excel is one of the reasons that so few businesses will
    move away from MS Windows in the foreseeable future, simply because
    there is nothing to compare with it's flexibility and power.

    Sure, if you just want a flashy calculator, you can use Open Office or
    Star Office or something, but they don't come near the power of
    Excel's VBA object model / capabilities.

    Personally, I am all for the Linux / OSS model - I love that it gives
    us so much choice and mostly for free compared to the extortionate
    prices for Office.

    However, in most business environments Excel and Access rule for the
    actual end users who need to use the business data stored in the
    enterprise DBs and there is no marginal cash cost to using them since
    they are already there.

    >
    > BTW you can get a copy of gawk.exe, on its own, from nearly
    > everywhere on the internet. You could also do the same thing with
    > perl.exe, viz:
    >
    > dir /b/s | perl -ne 'print $_ if length($_) > 255;'
    >


    Personally, I do not know anyone who would have access to gawk.exe or
    Perl.exe outside of software developers etc. I'm sure some people do,
    but at the same time I cannot think of anyone at any of my clients who
    *doesn't* have excel available.

    At the end of the day, the OP needs a solution, and it appears that
    this gives them one that they can implement quickly, easily, and
    safely.

    >
    > Doing it in excel is lame.
    >


    {Shrug}

    Took me about 3 mins to do when I tried it and that's *all* that
    really matters in the end isn't it?

    What would be the benefit of spending 15 mins finding, downloading,
    installing (maybe), and working out how to use, say, perl or gawk,
    when they can do the above in 5 mins, get the answer they need, and
    move on to something else that needs to be done.

    The OP wanted a solution that works for them and that does I believe.

    Plus, no need to search for and download software that might have
    nasties in it either.

    Each to his own.

    Alan.


    --
    The views expressed are my own, and not those of my employer or anyone
    else associated with me.

    My current valid email address is:



    This is valid as is. It is not munged, or altered at all.

    It will be valid for AT LEAST one month from the date of this post.

    If you are trying to contact me after that time,
    it MAY still be valid, but may also have been
    deactivated due to spam. If so, and you want
    to contact me by email, try searching for a
    more recent post by me to find my current
    email address
     
    Alan, Oct 6, 2005
    #11
  12. KiwiBrian

    Harry Guest

    Alan wrote:

    > "Harry" <> wrote in message
    > news:
    >>
    >> Gee that is really simple. Clever of MS to provide such a powerful
    >> and user-friendly tool! So simple!
    >>

    >
    > Indeed - I totally agree.
    >
    > In my opinion Excel is one of the reasons that so few businesses will
    > move away from MS Windows in the foreseeable future, simply because
    > there is nothing to compare with it's flexibility and power.
    >
    > Sure, if you just want a flashy calculator, you can use Open Office or
    > Star Office or something, but they don't come near the power of
    > Excel's VBA object model / capabilities.
    >
    > Personally, I am all for the Linux / OSS model - I love that it gives
    > us so much choice and mostly for free compared to the extortionate
    > prices for Office.
    >
    > However, in most business environments Excel and Access rule for the
    > actual end users who need to use the business data stored in the
    > enterprise DBs and there is no marginal cash cost to using them since
    > they are already there.
    >
    >>
    >> BTW you can get a copy of gawk.exe, on its own, from nearly
    >> everywhere on the internet. You could also do the same thing with
    >> perl.exe, viz:
    >>
    >> dir /b/s | perl -ne 'print $_ if length($_) > 255;'
    >>

    >
    > Personally, I do not know anyone who would have access to gawk.exe or
    > Perl.exe outside of software developers etc. I'm sure some people do,
    > but at the same time I cannot think of anyone at any of my clients who
    > *doesn't* have excel available.
    >
    > At the end of the day, the OP needs a solution, and it appears that
    > this gives them one that they can implement quickly, easily, and
    > safely.
    >
    >>
    >> Doing it in excel is lame.
    >>

    >
    > {Shrug}
    >
    > Took me about 3 mins to do when I tried it and that's *all* that
    > really matters in the end isn't it?


    It took me as long as it took to type the answer. About 10 seconds.

    >
    > What would be the benefit of spending 15 mins finding, downloading,
    > installing (maybe), and working out how to use, say, perl or gawk,
    > when they can do the above in 5 mins, get the answer they need, and
    > move on to something else that needs to be done.


    Because the next time it will be a lot faster and easier.

    The sort of person who has a problem with path lengths isn't going
    to be your average Excel user. They are going to be a lot closer to
    the software and hardware than that. Therefore they should equip themselves
    with some tools that do the job more quickerly and more better (in MS-speak).

    >
    > The OP wanted a solution that works for them and that does I believe.
    >


    Excel is so fantastic at doing the job that the OP had to ask in
    a newsgroup how to do it! LOL.

    > Plus, no need to search for and download software that might have
    > nasties in it either.


    Sure! Only had to download and setup nntp client software and post
    a question in a newsgroup to get the solution. LOL!

    >
    > Each to his own.
    >
     
    Harry, Oct 6, 2005
    #12
  13. KiwiBrian

    Adam Guest

    On 05 Oct 2005 21:55:51 GMT, Mark C wrote:

    >"KiwiBrian" <> wrote in
    >news:di0kl6$987$:
    >
    >>
    >> "Harry" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> KiwiBrian wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Is there a utility or program that I can point at a top level
    >>>> folder in a hierarchy and it will tell me of any files whose
    >>>> total path-length including file-name exceeds a predefined
    >>>> figure? It appears that Windows allows this situation to be
    >>>> created, thus ensuring
    >>>> some unpredictable side-effects, none of them good.
    >>>> I have not been able to find any way of checking a current
    >>>> existing situation, which seems a bit bizarre.
    >>>
    >>> find / | awk 'length($0}>255{print $0}'

    >>
    >> Thanks Harry.
    >> What would I have to do to run this on a Windows XP SP2 PC?
    >> Brian Tozer

    >
    >dir /b/s | gawk "length($0}>255{print $0}"
    >
    >Get gawk here:
    >http://unxutils.sourceforge.net


    Out of interest, I downloaded the utils and ran the gawk.exe from a
    DOS shell (in the wbin directory, Brian!).

    Turns out you have a typo:

    dir /b/s | gawk "length($0)>255{print $0}"

    The curly brace after the first $0 should be a plain old right
    bracket.

    I did a test using:

    dir c:\ /b/s | gawk "length($0)>100{print $0}"

    and it spewed out thousands of them .. at great speed!

    Adam.
     
    Adam, Oct 6, 2005
    #13
  14. Harry wrote:
    >>Plus, no need to search for and download software that might have
    >>nasties in it either.


    > Sure! Only had to download and setup nntp client software and post
    > a question in a newsgroup to get the solution. LOL!


    The OP is using windows, even if he didn't already have an nntp client
    setup, MS provide a handy one called Outlook Express(which the OP was
    using)...

    The way you describe it, he would also have to install and configure a
    browser before using your solution.

    --
    http://dave.net.nz - my site.
    http://www.dave.net.nz/csb/id37.htm <- Blog.
     
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Oct 6, 2005
    #14
  15. KiwiBrian

    Alan Guest

    "Harry" <> wrote in message
    news:
    >
    > It took me as long as it took to type the answer. About 10 seconds.
    >


    But it would have taken the OP much longer to find it and get it
    working - your focus is on you, not the OP.

    >
    > The sort of person who has a problem with path lengths isn't going
    > to be your average Excel user. They are going to be a lot closer to
    > the software and hardware than that. Therefore they should equip
    > themselves with some tools that do the job more quickerly and more
    > better (in MS-speak).
    >


    It is a very common issue for standard users when writing to CD if
    they use the (Joliet?) standard which restricts total path length for,
    I guess, compatibility.

    I'm not suggesting that *you* would want to use excel, but if you
    walk into an office and try to get the users to use command line
    tools, you'll quickly find it ain't gonna happen. They will use the
    tools they are already familar with and that means MS Office.


    I'm done with this unless the OP has further queries.

    Alan.


    --
    The views expressed are my own, and not those of my employer or anyone
    else associated with me.

    My current valid email address is:



    This is valid as is. It is not munged, or altered at all.

    It will be valid for AT LEAST one month from the date of this post.

    If you are trying to contact me after that time,
    it MAY still be valid, but may also have been
    deactivated due to spam. If so, and you want
    to contact me by email, try searching for a
    more recent post by me to find my current
    email address
     
    Alan, Oct 6, 2005
    #15
  16. KiwiBrian

    Harry Guest

    Alan wrote:

    > "Harry" <> wrote in message
    > news:
    >>
    >> It took me as long as it took to type the answer. About 10 seconds.
    >>

    >
    > But it would have taken the OP much longer to find it and get it
    > working - your focus is on you, not the OP.
    >
    >>
    >> The sort of person who has a problem with path lengths isn't going
    >> to be your average Excel user. They are going to be a lot closer to
    >> the software and hardware than that. Therefore they should equip
    >> themselves with some tools that do the job more quickerly and more
    >> better (in MS-speak).
    >>

    >
    > It is a very common issue for standard users when writing to CD if
    > they use the (Joliet?) standard which restricts total path length for,
    > I guess, compatibility.
    >
    > I'm not suggesting that *you* would want to use excel, but if you
    > walk into an office and try to get the users to use command line
    > tools, you'll quickly find it ain't gonna happen. They will use the
    > tools they are already familar with and that means MS Office.
    >
    >
    > I'm done with this unless the OP has further queries.
    >


    Oh really!?
     
    Harry, Oct 7, 2005
    #16
  17. KiwiBrian

    Harry Guest

    Dave - Dave.net.nz wrote:

    > Harry wrote:
    >>>Plus, no need to search for and download software that might have
    >>>nasties in it either.

    >
    >> Sure! Only had to download and setup nntp client software and post
    >> a question in a newsgroup to get the solution. LOL!

    >
    > The OP is using windows, even if he didn't already have an nntp client
    > setup, MS provide a handy one called Outlook Express(which the OP was
    > using)...


    But the OP had to "type a question".
    Though the OP might apparently loath using a command-line, like having
    to type something, the OP was perfectly prepared to open up OE
    and type something!

    The OP might be perfectly prepared to learn how to use Excel, and perhaps
    how to use the English language, but the OP is not prepared to learn
    relatively simpel commands.

    What is the difference between typing a macro in a spreadsheet and
    typing a command in a window?

    >
    > The way you describe it, he would also have to install and configure a
    > browser before using your solution.
    >


    Huh?
     
    Harry, Oct 7, 2005
    #17
  18. KiwiBrian

    Harry Guest

    Adam wrote:

    > On 05 Oct 2005 21:55:51 GMT, Mark C wrote:
    >
    >>"KiwiBrian" <> wrote in
    >>news:di0kl6$987$:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "Harry" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> KiwiBrian wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Is there a utility or program that I can point at a top level
    >>>>> folder in a hierarchy and it will tell me of any files whose
    >>>>> total path-length including file-name exceeds a predefined
    >>>>> figure? It appears that Windows allows this situation to be
    >>>>> created, thus ensuring
    >>>>> some unpredictable side-effects, none of them good.
    >>>>> I have not been able to find any way of checking a current
    >>>>> existing situation, which seems a bit bizarre.
    >>>>
    >>>> find / | awk 'length($0}>255{print $0}'
    >>>
    >>> Thanks Harry.
    >>> What would I have to do to run this on a Windows XP SP2 PC?
    >>> Brian Tozer

    >>
    >>dir /b/s | gawk "length($0}>255{print $0}"
    >>
    >>Get gawk here:
    >>http://unxutils.sourceforge.net

    >
    > Out of interest, I downloaded the utils and ran the gawk.exe from a
    > DOS shell (in the wbin directory, Brian!).
    >
    > Turns out you have a typo:
    >
    > dir /b/s | gawk "length($0)>255{print $0}"
    >
    > The curly brace after the first $0 should be a plain old right
    > bracket.


    Quite right! My very first typo. Congratulations.

    >
    > I did a test using:
    >
    > dir c:\ /b/s | gawk "length($0)>100{print $0}"
    >
    > and it spewed out thousands of them .. at great speed!
    >


    That wassn't very difficult was it?
    Or perhaps opening up Excel and typing in a whole lot of
    formulae would be easier?
     
    Harry, Oct 7, 2005
    #18
  19. Harry wrote:
    > Dave - Dave.net.nz wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Harry wrote:
    >>
    >>>>Plus, no need to search for and download software that might have
    >>>>nasties in it either.

    >>
    >>>Sure! Only had to download and setup nntp client software and post
    >>>a question in a newsgroup to get the solution. LOL!

    >>
    >>The OP is using windows, even if he didn't already have an nntp client
    >>setup, MS provide a handy one called Outlook Express(which the OP was
    >>using)...

    >
    >
    > But the OP had to "type a question".
    > Though the OP might apparently loath using a command-line, like having
    > to type something, the OP was perfectly prepared to open up OE
    > and type something!
    >
    > The OP might be perfectly prepared to learn how to use Excel, and perhaps
    > how to use the English language, but the OP is not prepared to learn
    > relatively simpel commands.
    >
    > What is the difference between typing a macro in a spreadsheet and
    > typing a command in a window?


    the "command in a window" that he was offered meant he had to download
    some stuff, the macro in excell he didn't.

    >>The way you describe it, he would also have to install and configure a
    >>browser before using your solution.


    > Huh?


    thought that might go over your head.

    --
    http://dave.net.nz - my site.
    http://www.dave.net.nz/csb/id37.htm <- Blog.
     
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Oct 7, 2005
    #19
  20. T'was the Thu, 06 Oct 2005 22:22:25 +1000 when I remembered Harry
    <> saying something like this:

    >The sort of person who has a problem with path lengths isn't going
    >to be your average Excel user. They are going to be a lot closer to
    >the software and hardware than that.


    That's not true. I've had files written to my computer by programs
    that have had massive names. Then when I tried to copy those files to
    a CD, I get problems.

    This is a problem "average Excel users" face.
    --
    Cheers,

    Waylon Kenning.
     
    Waylon Kenning, Oct 7, 2005
    #20
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