cheap 35mm film scanner - is it any good?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by aniramca@gmail.com, Feb 3, 2009.

  1. Guest

    I just saw it was advertised in our local store. It costs around $100.
    It is an Optex Digiscan, dedicated for 35mm negatives and slides. It
    comes with a software.
    See brochure at http://www.gentec-intl.com/GentecInc/Press/digiscan_release.pdf
    My question is how good is it?. Is it worth to get, rather than to
    scan the colour prints. They said that it has a 5 MP sensor and can
    get a 2592x1680 resolution JPG files.
    I know that dedicated 35mm scanner made by Canon, Nikon or Epson is
    expensive (price $600 and up). Some has a fancy cleaning tool,
    recognizing a tiny spot in a negative IS a major factor when you scan
    negatives. So, is a $100 a waste of money, or can it make reasonable
    digital photos out of this machine? Anyone use this before or similar
    cheap 35mm scanner ( this is a new product by Optex, came out in Dec
    2008)?. I heard that there are other negative scanners around this
    price at some camera stores, or Costco. Is it worth it, or should I
    stick to my old Canon flat bed scanner and use my old photo prints?

    Thanks for the info.
    , Feb 3, 2009
    #1
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  2. Dave Cohen Guest

    wrote:
    > I just saw it was advertised in our local store. It costs around $100.
    > It is an Optex Digiscan, dedicated for 35mm negatives and slides. It
    > comes with a software.
    > See brochure at http://www.gentec-intl.com/GentecInc/Press/digiscan_release.pdf
    > My question is how good is it?. Is it worth to get, rather than to
    > scan the colour prints. They said that it has a 5 MP sensor and can
    > get a 2592x1680 resolution JPG files.
    > I know that dedicated 35mm scanner made by Canon, Nikon or Epson is
    > expensive (price $600 and up). Some has a fancy cleaning tool,
    > recognizing a tiny spot in a negative IS a major factor when you scan
    > negatives. So, is a $100 a waste of money, or can it make reasonable
    > digital photos out of this machine? Anyone use this before or similar
    > cheap 35mm scanner ( this is a new product by Optex, came out in Dec
    > 2008)?. I heard that there are other negative scanners around this
    > price at some camera stores, or Costco. Is it worth it, or should I
    > stick to my old Canon flat bed scanner and use my old photo prints?
    >
    > Thanks for the info.


    Friend of mine got one that looks like picture and cost $100. No
    adjustment on scanning. Did a reasonable job on his negatives, very poor
    on a bunch of my old slides. If you have decent prints, stay with the
    flatbed as long as scanned quality is good.
    Dave Cohen
    Dave Cohen, Feb 3, 2009
    #2
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  3. Guest

    On Feb 2, 8:03 pm, wrote:
    > I just saw it was advertised in our local store. It costs around $100.
    > It is an Optex Digiscan, dedicated for 35mm negatives and slides. It
    > comes with a software.
    > See brochure athttp://www.gentec-intl.com/GentecInc/Press/digiscan_release.pdf
    > My question is how good is it?. Is it worth to get, rather than to
    > scan the colour prints. They said that it has a 5 MP sensor and can
    > get a 2592x1680 resolution JPG files.
    > I know that dedicated 35mm scanner made by Canon, Nikon or Epson is
    > expensive (price $600 and up). Some has a fancy cleaning tool,
    > recognizing a tiny spot in a negative IS a major factor when you scan
    > negatives. So, is a $100 a waste of money, or can it make reasonable
    > digital photos out of this machine?  Anyone use this before or similar
    > cheap 35mm scanner ( this is a new product by Optex, came out in Dec
    > 2008)?. I heard that there are other negative scanners around this
    > price at some camera stores, or Costco. Is it worth it, or should I
    > stick to my old Canon flat bed scanner and use my old photo prints?
    >
    > Thanks for the info.


    Not a scanner at all but a small sensor 5mp digital camera. Hardly the
    best choice, you'd do better with a second hand macro lens on your
    digital camera. Would a cheap scanner do better, maybe maybe not, go
    up to a an Epson V500 or Canoscan 8800 and you'll probably do better.

    Tom
    , Feb 3, 2009
    #3
  4. bmc

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    Optex digital scanner for negatives, slides

    wouldn't recommend this to anyone wanting quality. Other than being convenient, both slides and negatives results were terrible. My slides are Kodachrome and in excellent shape - results of scans were fuzzy with moderate to poor color representation - you get what you pay for and this is definitely not worth the bargain price. I've returned mine and am now back in the market for a quality scanner. Any suggestions?
    bmc, Dec 12, 2009
    #4
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