charging battery "round robin" style

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by short circuit, Jun 28, 2009.

  1. I'm just tossing about an idea here. Let's say you have a 12 volt car battery,
    not hooked up to a car. And you need AC. So you hook an inverter to it. Knowing
    that after an hour or so, maybe less, the battery will be dead. Now what if you
    connected to that battery, a battery charger and fed the output back to the same
    battery? Would that idea work or not?
     
    short circuit, Jun 28, 2009
    #1
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  2. short circuit

    sandy58 Guest

    On Jun 28, 10:59 pm, short circuit <> wrote:
    > I'm just tossing about an idea here. Let's say you have a 12 volt car battery,
    > not hooked up to a car. And you need AC. So you hook an inverter to it. Knowing
    > that after an hour or so, maybe less, the battery will be dead. Now what if you
    > connected to that battery, a battery charger and fed the output back to the same
    > battery? Would that idea work or not?


    Wear it for a hat....& recharge what little grey cells you have left.
    Fuckin clown!!
     
    sandy58, Jun 28, 2009
    #2
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  3. short circuit

    Buffalo Guest

    short circuit wrote:
    > I'm just tossing about an idea here. Let's say you have a 12 volt car
    > battery, not hooked up to a car. And you need AC. So you hook an
    > inverter to it. Knowing that after an hour or so, maybe less, the
    > battery will be dead. Now what if you connected to that battery, a
    > battery charger and fed the output back to the same battery? Would
    > that idea work or not?


    You are suggesting something like perpetual motion.
    No, it will not work for long because there is energy lost between the
    inverter and the charger. So, shortly, it will take more energy to charge
    that battery than the battery gives to the inverter.
    PS: In case you don't comprehend, the charged battery will last longer doing
    nothing than it will if you hook it up to an AC inverter which is used to
    power a battery charger to charge the battery.
     
    Buffalo, Jun 29, 2009
    #3
  4. short circuit

    Buffalo Guest

    Rôgêr wrote:
    > short circuit wrote:
    >> I'm just tossing about an idea here. Let's say you have a 12 volt
    >> car battery, not hooked up to a car. And you need AC. So you hook an
    >> inverter to it. Knowing that after an hour or so, maybe less, the
    >> battery will be dead. Now what if you connected to that battery, a
    >> battery charger and fed the output back to the same battery? Would
    >> that idea work or not?

    >
    >
    > Let's see: 12VDC battery to 120VAC inverter, okay so far.
    >
    > Then: 120VAC charger to 12VDC battery to 120VAC inverter. So you start
    > out with 120VAC and do all that inverting, converting and charging and
    > end up with 120VAC? Brilliant! Why didn't I think of that?


    Yes, why didn't you? :)
    Buffalo
    PS: He was just trying to keep his battery charged.
     
    Buffalo, Jun 29, 2009
    #4
  5. short circuit

    VanguardLH Guest

    short circuit wrote:

    > I'm just tossing about an idea here. Let's say you have a 12 volt car battery,
    > not hooked up to a car. And you need AC. So you hook an inverter to it. Knowing
    > that after an hour or so, maybe less, the battery will be dead. Now what if you
    > connected to that battery, a battery charger and fed the output back to the same
    > battery? Would that idea work or not?


    You want to generate A/C current from a D/C battery. Okay, that's
    doable and has a purpose. You then want to convert A/C to D/C to charge
    the battery to which the connected inverter will convert D/C to A/C.
    Um, so where do you come out ahead? You already had the A/C that you
    were going to generate from the battery, so why not use that?

    Um, if you had enough input A/C current to sustain the load on the
    battery that was being converted to A/C output then just use the A/C
    input. Oh, but you want the A/C output of the battery to recharge the
    battery that you are discharging to produce that A/C output. Uh huh,
    another boob that thinks perpetual machines are possible simply because
    they never expend any effort to think about the losses involved.

    Is the point that there is no point and you are trying to contrive some
    Rube Goldberg complexity that a far simpler setup would have solved?

    "short circuit" is an appropriate moniker.
     
    VanguardLH, Jun 29, 2009
    #5
  6. short circuit

    Mike Yetto Guest

    Bada bing short circuit <> bada bang:
    > I'm just tossing about an idea here. Let's say you have a 12 volt car battery,
    > not hooked up to a car. And you need AC. So you hook an inverter to it. Knowing
    > that after an hour or so, maybe less, the battery will be dead. Now what if you
    > connected to that battery, a battery charger and fed the output back to the same
    > battery? Would that idea work or not?
    >


    After charging the battery you need to connect the inverter
    without disconnecting the charger from the main power supply.
    This next step must be done *very* quickly. Unplug the charger
    from the wall and plug it into the inverter before any electrons
    spill out. If you detect *any* spillage the system is likely to
    wind down in a few hours. You might be able to correct that
    problem if you sweep up all of the spilled electrons (try to
    aviod any from other sources, such as a pet dog or cat) and put
    them back into the circuit. The caps on the cells of the battery
    should provide a decent entry point. It isn't necessary to
    spread the electrons evenly through all of the cells, but it
    won't hurt to do so.

    Mike "HTH and HAND" Yetto
    --
    Pluralitas non est ponenda sine necessitas.
    - William of Ockham
     
    Mike Yetto, Jun 29, 2009
    #6
  7. short circuit

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2009-06-28, short circuit <> wrote:

    > I'm just tossing about an idea here. Let's say you have a 12 volt car
    > battery, not hooked up to a car. And you need AC. So you hook an inverter
    > to it. Knowing that after an hour or so, maybe less, the battery will be
    > dead. Now what if you connected to that battery, a battery charger and
    > fed the output back to the same battery? Would that idea work or not?


    What do you mean by "work"? You'd certainly generate heat while the
    battery discharged - and it would still go flat, of course.

    Or are you trying to build some sort of 'uninterruptible power supply'?
    If so, there's rather more to it than you seem to think.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Jun 29, 2009
    #7
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