changing router howto

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Jeff@unknown.com, Jul 15, 2008.

  1. Guest

    Hi

    I have a working home wlan for 3 PCs all using XP SP3 and I connect to the
    internet through a router. My present router and PC adapters are G type and
    I use WPA encryption.

    Because the signal is very weak in some parts of my house (I've tried
    moving the router and antenna with little success) I decided to buy a N
    router: Linksys N Ultra (WRT160N).

    Before switching the routers I would like some advice.

    1. Obviously I would like to transfer the present settings to the new
    router. Is there an easy way to do that?

    2. What info would I need from the present wlan to manually set the new
    router so it will function on my present wlan (same passwords, etc.) and
    firewall (ZoneAlarm).

    3. Although the N router box says it is "compatible with wireless G devices"
    should I expect trouble? I recall I had a heck of a time getting the
    present system working when I set it up years ago.

    Thanks.

    Jeff
     
    , Jul 15, 2008
    #1
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  2. Lem Guest

    wrote:
    > Hi
    >
    > I have a working home wlan for 3 PCs all using XP SP3 and I connect to the
    > internet through a router. My present router and PC adapters are G type and
    > I use WPA encryption.
    >
    > Because the signal is very weak in some parts of my house (I've tried
    > moving the router and antenna with little success) I decided to buy a N
    > router: Linksys N Ultra (WRT160N).
    >
    > Before switching the routers I would like some advice.
    >
    > 1. Obviously I would like to transfer the present settings to the new
    > router. Is there an easy way to do that?
    >
    > 2. What info would I need from the present wlan to manually set the new
    > router so it will function on my present wlan (same passwords, etc.) and
    > firewall (ZoneAlarm).
    >
    > 3. Although the N router box says it is "compatible with wireless G devices"
    > should I expect trouble? I recall I had a heck of a time getting the
    > present system working when I set it up years ago.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Jeff
    >
    >


    To start at the end, you won't get much, if any, benefit from a draft-N
    router unless you get draft-N adapters. That is, if you are concerned
    about compatibility with wireless G devices, that tells me that you are
    planning to keep the wireless G adapters. To quote the Linksys writeup
    about the WRT160N:

    <quote>
    It works great with standard Wireless-G and -B equipment, but when both
    ends of the wireless link are Wireless-N, the router can increase the
    throughput even more by using twice as much radio band, yielding speeds
    far faster than standard Wireless-G. But unlike other speed-enhanced
    technologies, Wireless-N can dynamically enable this double-speed mode
    for Wireless-N devices, while still connecting to other wireless devices
    at their respective fastest speeds.
    </quote>

    The information you need when you change routers is:
    - the SSID of your wireless network
    - the WPA encryption key

    The SSID is easy: Unless you have disabled SSID broadcast in a
    misguided attempt to increase security by obscurity, the SSID is
    viewable from any of your current wireless computers by selecting "View
    available wireless networks."

    Even if you have disabled SSID broadcast, both your SSID and the
    passphrase used to generate the WPA key should be available from the
    web-based configuration screens of your current router. If you have a
    Linksys WRTG54xx router, simply log in to the router using your favorite
    web browser. The SSID is shown at the Wireless>Basic Wireless Settings
    screen, and the passphrase is shown (in clear) at Wireless>Wireless
    Security. The information from other routers will be the same.

    The easiest way to set up any new router is just to log in to its
    configuration utility and set the SSID and encryption key. Depending on
    how you connect to the Internet, you may also need to know the username
    and password assigned by your ISP. Unfortunately, although the username
    probably is shown in clear on your current router's Setup>Basic Setup
    screen (again, Linksys example), your ISP password is not shown. You'll
    have to know what it is or call up your ISP.

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP

    To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
     
    Lem, Jul 16, 2008
    #2
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  3. Guest

    Thank you very much for the help.

    The only thing I need the new router for is to get wider coverage. Am I
    correct in understanding that what you are saying is that if my PC adapters
    remain G, that will NOT happen just by changing the router?

    Thanks.

    Jeff

    Lem wrote:
    > wrote:
    >> Hi
    >>
    >> I have a working home wlan for 3 PCs all using XP SP3 and I connect
    >> to the internet through a router. My present router and PC adapters
    >> are G type and I use WPA encryption.
    >>
    >> Because the signal is very weak in some parts of my house (I've
    >> tried moving the router and antenna with little success) I decided
    >> to buy a N router: Linksys N Ultra (WRT160N).
    >>
    >> Before switching the routers I would like some advice.
    >>
    >> 1. Obviously I would like to transfer the present settings to the new
    >> router. Is there an easy way to do that?
    >>
    >> 2. What info would I need from the present wlan to manually set the
    >> new router so it will function on my present wlan (same passwords,
    >> etc.) and firewall (ZoneAlarm).
    >>
    >> 3. Although the N router box says it is "compatible with wireless G
    >> devices" should I expect trouble? I recall I had a heck of a time
    >> getting the present system working when I set it up years ago.
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >> Jeff
    >>
    >>

    >
    > To start at the end, you won't get much, if any, benefit from a
    > draft-N router unless you get draft-N adapters. That is, if you are
    > concerned about compatibility with wireless G devices, that tells me
    > that you are planning to keep the wireless G adapters. To quote the
    > Linksys writeup about the WRT160N:
    >
    > <quote>
    > It works great with standard Wireless-G and -B equipment, but when
    > both ends of the wireless link are Wireless-N, the router can
    > increase the throughput even more by using twice as much radio band,
    > yielding speeds far faster than standard Wireless-G. But unlike other
    > speed-enhanced technologies, Wireless-N can dynamically enable this
    > double-speed mode for Wireless-N devices, while still connecting to
    > other wireless devices at their respective fastest speeds.
    > </quote>
    >
    > The information you need when you change routers is:
    > - the SSID of your wireless network
    > - the WPA encryption key
    >
    > The SSID is easy: Unless you have disabled SSID broadcast in a
    > misguided attempt to increase security by obscurity, the SSID is
    > viewable from any of your current wireless computers by selecting
    > "View available wireless networks."
    >
    > Even if you have disabled SSID broadcast, both your SSID and the
    > passphrase used to generate the WPA key should be available from the
    > web-based configuration screens of your current router. If you have a
    > Linksys WRTG54xx router, simply log in to the router using your
    > favorite web browser. The SSID is shown at the Wireless>Basic
    > Wireless Settings screen, and the passphrase is shown (in clear) at
    > Wireless>Wireless Security. The information from other routers will
    > be the same.
    > The easiest way to set up any new router is just to log in to its
    > configuration utility and set the SSID and encryption key. Depending
    > on how you connect to the Internet, you may also need to know the
    > username and password assigned by your ISP. Unfortunately, although
    > the username probably is shown in clear on your current router's
    > Setup>Basic Setup screen (again, Linksys example), your ISP password
    > is not shown. You'll have to know what it is or call up your ISP.
     
    , Jul 16, 2008
    #3
  4. "" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thank you very much for the help.
    >
    > The only thing I need the new router for is to get wider coverage. Am I
    > correct in understanding that what you are saying is that if my PC
    > adapters remain G, that will NOT happen just by changing the router?


    More or less,...correct. Remember that the Nic in the PCs still has to
    "reach out" to the router as well,..replacing the router won't help that.

    Instead of buying an "N" router when the N Standard has not even been
    ratified and completed yet,..just keep the one you have and place it towards
    one end of the building. Then buy a Wireless Access Point (WAP) which is
    *not* a router and place it towards the other end of the building. Connect
    the WAP and the "router" with a physical cable. I realize running a cable
    can be a hassle,..you'll have to decide if it is worth the trouble to do
    that,...or replace every one of your "G" componenets with "N" components.

    If you replace the N devices stay with the same brand. Because the N
    standard is not finalized, different brands may have their own way of
    implementing it and will only communicate dependably if the brands are the
    same.

    Adding the WAP:
    The WAP needs an IP# compatible with your LAN.
    The WAP is configured via a Web Interface just like the Router
    Configure the WAP's wireless features identical to the Router except make
    the SSID different.

    The PCs just simply connect to the device with the strongest signal. If the
    PC has been set to be able to connect to either one then it will usually
    automatically connect to the device with the strongest signal.

    This is the way business with larger building get their signal out. They
    don't keep replacing devices with more "reach" becuase there is just no such
    thing, they don't exist. The FCC regulates the signal strenth. "N" devices
    only reach farther because it is a different technology that, theoretically,
    makes more effieicnt use of the resources available.

    --
    Phillip Windell
    www.wandtv.com

    The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
    or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    -----------------------------------------------------
     
    Phillip Windell, Jul 16, 2008
    #4
  5. Guest

    Phillip Windell wrote:
    > "" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Thank you very much for the help.
    >>
    >> The only thing I need the new router for is to get wider coverage. Am I
    >> correct in understanding that what you are saying is that if my
    >> PC adapters remain G, that will NOT happen just by changing the
    >> router?

    >
    > More or less,...correct. Remember that the Nic in the PCs still has
    > to "reach out" to the router as well,..replacing the router won't
    > help that.
    > Instead of buying an "N" router when the N Standard has not even been
    > ratified and completed yet,..just keep the one you have and place it
    > towards one end of the building. Then buy a Wireless Access Point
    > (WAP) which is *not* a router and place it towards the other end of
    > the building. Connect the WAP and the "router" with a physical cable.
    > I realize running a cable can be a hassle,..you'll have to decide if
    > it is worth the trouble to do that,...or replace every one of your
    > "G" componenets with "N" components.
    > If you replace the N devices stay with the same brand. Because the N
    > standard is not finalized, different brands may have their own way of
    > implementing it and will only communicate dependably if the brands
    > are the same.
    >
    > Adding the WAP:
    > The WAP needs an IP# compatible with your LAN.
    > The WAP is configured via a Web Interface just like the Router
    > Configure the WAP's wireless features identical to the Router except
    > make the SSID different.
    >
    > The PCs just simply connect to the device with the strongest signal.
    > If the PC has been set to be able to connect to either one then it
    > will usually automatically connect to the device with the strongest
    > signal.
    > This is the way business with larger building get their signal out. They
    > don't keep replacing devices with more "reach" becuase there is
    > just no such thing, they don't exist. The FCC regulates the signal
    > strenth. "N" devices only reach farther because it is a different
    > technology that, theoretically, makes more effieicnt use of the
    > resources available.


    Thank you very much. Very helpful.

    Jeff
     
    , Jul 16, 2008
    #5
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