Changing Power Supply on Desktop

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Toolman Tim, May 28, 2006.

  1. Toolman Tim

    Toolman Tim Guest

    In news:wjmeg.8$,
    Luke O'Malley spewed forth:
    > I have a 'frankenstein' computer and there is a problem with the
    > power supply. After about three hours on it turns off and then
    > reboots. You can hear a click when it happens.
    >
    > I was thinking (ouch, that hurts) . . . that I could pick up a
    > discarded PC and substitute the power supply from that into mine. I
    > know I have sn Intel III, 797 Mhz, 384 MB desktop. What kind of
    > problems do I have to look out for? Is there anything I should look
    > for that would help - I have access to the local dump where there
    > keep the PC in a separate pile.
    >
    > Goodwill,
    > Luke


    It depends a bit on what you're putting it INTO as well as what it came out
    of.

    For instance, does it have enough wattage? Is the power filtered well
    enough? Is the new PC a P4 or AMD that requires the additional connection
    that the older P3 boards didn't need?

    You're best bet is to get a NEW one that has the horsepower and specs for
    the technology. Plus a warranty. A warranty is a good thing...

    --
    I always finish what I sta
    Toolman Tim, May 28, 2006
    #1
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  2. Luke O'Malley wrote:
    > -->>>>>>> Next Section <<<<<<<
    > Content-Type: Text/Plain; charset=US-ASCII
    >
    > I have a 'frankenstein' computer and there is a problem with the
    > power supply. After about three hours on it turns off and then
    > reboots. You can hear a click when it happens.
    >
    > I was thinking (ouch, that hurts) . . . that I could pick up a
    > discarded PC and substitute the power supply from that into mine. I
    > know I have sn Intel III, 797 Mhz, 384 MB desktop. What kind of
    > problems do I have to look out for? Is there anything I should look


    Computers that were discarded due to bad power supplies.

    > for that would help - I have access to the local dump where there
    > keep the PC in a separate pile.


    You can get a new PSU for $20US (convert as needed). Good ones cost
    more. But most of those junkers will have cheap OEM PSUs anyway.

    --
    Blinky RLU 297263
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
    Coming Soon: Filtering rules specific to various real news clients
    Blinky the Shark, May 28, 2006
    #2
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  3. Toolman Tim

    Toolman Tim Guest

    In news:,
    Blinky the Shark spewed forth:
    > Luke O'Malley wrote:
    >> -->>>>>>> Next Section <<<<<<<
    >> Content-Type: Text/Plain; charset=US-ASCII
    >>
    >> I have a 'frankenstein' computer and there is a problem with the
    >> power supply. After about three hours on it turns off and then
    >> reboots. You can hear a click when it happens.
    >>
    >> I was thinking (ouch, that hurts) . . . that I could pick up a
    >> discarded PC and substitute the power supply from that into mine. I
    >> know I have sn Intel III, 797 Mhz, 384 MB desktop. What kind of
    >> problems do I have to look out for? Is there anything I should look

    >
    > Computers that were discarded due to bad power supplies.
    >
    >> for that would help - I have access to the local dump where there
    >> keep the PC in a separate pile.

    >
    > You can get a new PSU for $20US (convert as needed). Good ones cost
    > more. But most of those junkers will have cheap OEM PSUs anyway.


    And no warranty <g>

    --
    I always finish what I sta
    Toolman Tim, May 28, 2006
    #3
  4. Toolman Tim

    Deano Guest

    Luke O'Malley wrote:
    > I have a 'frankenstein' computer and there is a problem with the
    > power supply. After about three hours on it turns off and then
    > reboots. You can hear a click when it happens.
    >
    > I was thinking (ouch, that hurts) . . . that I could pick up a
    > discarded PC and substitute the power supply from that into mine. I
    > know I have sn Intel III, 797 Mhz, 384 MB desktop. What kind of
    > problems do I have to look out for? Is there anything I should look
    > for that would help - I have access to the local dump where there
    > keep the PC in a separate pile.
    >
    > Goodwill,
    > Luke
    >


    Buy a quality PSU. I read somewhere that a weighty unit is a good
    indication of quality.

    And for god's sake do back up any valuable data. My computer died a few
    days ago and a few minutes before that it was switching off
    spontaneously just like that. It was a bad PSU - there was burning and
    scorching on the power supply connector.

    It hasn't been a good week....
    Deano, May 28, 2006
    #4
  5. Toolman Tim

    Toolman Tim Guest

    In news:447a05c8$0$18228$,
    Deano spewed forth:
    > Luke O'Malley wrote:
    >> I have a 'frankenstein' computer and there is a problem with the
    >> power supply. After about three hours on it turns off and then
    >> reboots. You can hear a click when it happens.
    >>
    >> I was thinking (ouch, that hurts) . . . that I could pick up a
    >> discarded PC and substitute the power supply from that into mine. I
    >> know I have sn Intel III, 797 Mhz, 384 MB desktop. What kind of
    >> problems do I have to look out for? Is there anything I should look
    >> for that would help - I have access to the local dump where there
    >> keep the PC in a separate pile.
    >>
    >> Goodwill,
    >> Luke
    >>

    >
    > Buy a quality PSU. I read somewhere that a weighty unit is a good
    > indication of quality.
    >

    I always liked the part in the movie "Jurassic Park" where the kid pulls out
    some night vision goggles from under the car seat. The lawyer asks if they
    were heavy, the kid answers yes, and the lawyer says something like "then
    they're expensive - put them back" <g>

    --
    I always finish what I sta
    Toolman Tim, May 28, 2006
    #5
  6. Toolman Tim

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-05-28, Luke O'Malley <> wrote:
    >
    > I have a 'frankenstein' computer and there is a problem with the
    > power supply. After about three hours on it turns off and then
    > reboots. You can hear a click when it happens.
    >
    > I was thinking (ouch, that hurts) . . . that I could pick up a
    > discarded PC and substitute the power supply from that into mine. I
    > know I have sn Intel III, 797 Mhz, 384 MB desktop. What kind of
    > problems do I have to look out for? Is there anything I should look
    > for that would help - I have access to the local dump where there
    > keep the PC in a separate pile.
    >
    > Goodwill,
    > Luke
    >


    Make sure that the problem really is with the power supply before you do
    too much; you might have some other problem that is causing the machine to
    'reboot' - eg something in software, or an overheating processor chip.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, May 28, 2006
    #6
  7. Toolman Tim

    ProfGene Guest

    If you have a newer computer they have from 350 WATTS to 450 and the olde
    rones only have 250 or 300. It depends how much you are running on the
    power. But new power supplys are not so expensive anymore.
    "Luke O'Malley" <> wrote in message
    news:wjmeg.8$...
    > I have a 'frankenstein' computer and there is a problem with the
    > power supply. After about three hours on it turns off and then
    > reboots. You can hear a click when it happens.
    >
    > I was thinking (ouch, that hurts) . . . that I could pick up a
    > discarded PC and substitute the power supply from that into mine. I
    > know I have sn Intel III, 797 Mhz, 384 MB desktop. What kind of
    > problems do I have to look out for? Is there anything I should look
    > for that would help - I have access to the local dump where there
    > keep the PC in a separate pile.
    >
    > Goodwill,
    > Luke
    >
    ProfGene, May 29, 2006
    #7
  8. In article pUmeg.17$,
    "Toolman Tim" <> said:
    -->
    -->In news:,
    -->Blinky the Shark spewed forth:
    -->> Luke O'Malley wrote:
    -->>>
    Luke O'Malley, May 29, 2006
    #8
  9. In article ,
    Blinky the Shark <> said:
    -->
    -->Luke O'Malley wrote:
    -->>
    Luke O'Malley, May 29, 2006
    #9
  10. Toolman Tim

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-05-29, Luke O'Malley <> wrote:
    >
    > In article ,
    > Whiskers <> said:
    > -->
    > -->On 2006-05-28, Luke O'Malley <>
    > -->wrote:


    snip

    > -->Make sure that the problem really is with the power supply before
    > -->you do
    > -->too much; you might have some other problem that is causing the
    > -->machine to
    > -->'reboot' - eg something in software, or an overheating processor
    > -->chip.
    >
    > Whiskers,
    > Thank you for the suggestions. Unfortunately I am not sure I know
    > how to test the processor to see if it is overheating. Is it just
    > 'touch' it, or is there usually a fan on it?
    > Luke


    There is usually a large 'heat sink' - a lump of metal with a lot of
    'fins' or 'slots' - and a fan either fitted to the heatsink, or placed
    close by. There may be a smaller heatsink, and perhaps another fan, for
    the 'video' chip(s). Make sure all the slots or gaps in the heatsink(s)
    are free of dust, using a compressed air can to 'blow through'. There may
    also be fans fitted to the case to move air in or out, and of course in
    the 'power supply' too.

    Any fans that refuse to spin fast when the PC is working 'normal-hard',
    should be replaced; usually not very expensive, but can be very fiddly.
    Power supplies are probably best not dismantled; if the fan in there is
    not working, get a new power supply.

    Some BIOSes display temperatures for the CPU or for the 'system'. If
    your operating system doesn't already have a tool to display such things
    as CPU temperature, there are probably free utilities that can do it.

    Nothing inside the case should feel 'hot' - but be careful that you
    'earth' your hand to some bare metal part of the case itself, before you
    let your fingers near the motherboard or any of the cards or other
    components, as you could easily pass on a 'static' charge big enough to
    cause damage to the chips (and if the monitor and/or mains supply are
    connected, you could get a very nasty shock yourself too; there are some
    high voltages in some of the connectors).

    Don't forget to check for 'malware' if you are running any sort of Windows;
    some types do cause machines to crash or re-boot periodically, I think.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, May 29, 2006
    #10
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