Changing partition types

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by -=rjh=-, Oct 3, 2005.

  1. -=rjh=-

    -=rjh=- Guest

    I want to transfer an existing working W2K installation to a replacement
    system (laptop). I do not want to install from scratch - and if it comes
    to that I'll almost certainly install Linux again. The hardware is
    almost identical, AFAIK the only difference is, the CPU is 50MHz slower
    on the replacement system. I don't want to swap the drives over.

    I have used Knoppix and Partimage to create and restore the relevant
    partition to the replacement system, set that partition active, etc. It
    boots but fails after the login prompt. Data visible on the restored
    filesystem looks about right. I figure that reinstalling Windows over
    the top of the existing system has a chance of fixing the problem.

    But, windows setup can't indentify the partition (gives type as
    "unknown"), and will only offer to delete and create a new partition to
    install windows on.

    Partition Magic sees the partition as ext2; Linux sees it as ntfs.
    BartPE doesn't see anything, but I haven't used it before so that might
    be normal. Seems to me these are all using different methods of
    identifying the partition.

    How do I convince Windows setup to reinstall Windows?

    Any other strategies to deal with this?

    TIA
    -=rjh=-, Oct 3, 2005
    #1
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  2. -=rjh=-

    Mercury Guest

    the correct way to do this is to do a repair install of windows.
    see www.michaelstevenstech.com for details.
    you will need all laptop drivers at hand.

    "-=rjh=-" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I want to transfer an existing working W2K installation to a replacement
    >system (laptop). I do not want to install from scratch - and if it comes to
    >that I'll almost certainly install Linux again. The hardware is almost
    >identical, AFAIK the only difference is, the CPU is 50MHz slower on the
    >replacement system. I don't want to swap the drives over.
    >
    > I have used Knoppix and Partimage to create and restore the relevant
    > partition to the replacement system, set that partition active, etc. It
    > boots but fails after the login prompt. Data visible on the restored
    > filesystem looks about right. I figure that reinstalling Windows over the
    > top of the existing system has a chance of fixing the problem.
    >
    > But, windows setup can't indentify the partition (gives type as
    > "unknown"), and will only offer to delete and create a new partition to
    > install windows on.
    >
    > Partition Magic sees the partition as ext2; Linux sees it as ntfs. BartPE
    > doesn't see anything, but I haven't used it before so that might be
    > normal. Seems to me these are all using different methods of identifying
    > the partition.
    >
    > How do I convince Windows setup to reinstall Windows?
    >
    > Any other strategies to deal with this?
    >
    > TIA
    Mercury, Oct 3, 2005
    #2
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  3. -=rjh=-

    Rob J Guest

    In article <>, says...
    > I want to transfer an existing working W2K installation to a replacement
    > system (laptop). I do not want to install from scratch - and if it comes
    > to that I'll almost certainly install Linux again. The hardware is
    > almost identical, AFAIK the only difference is, the CPU is 50MHz slower
    > on the replacement system. I don't want to swap the drives over.
    >
    > I have used Knoppix and Partimage to create and restore the relevant
    > partition to the replacement system, set that partition active, etc. It
    > boots but fails after the login prompt. Data visible on the restored
    > filesystem looks about right. I figure that reinstalling Windows over
    > the top of the existing system has a chance of fixing the problem.
    >
    > But, windows setup can't indentify the partition (gives type as
    > "unknown"), and will only offer to delete and create a new partition to
    > install windows on.
    >
    > Partition Magic sees the partition as ext2; Linux sees it as ntfs.
    > BartPE doesn't see anything, but I haven't used it before so that might
    > be normal. Seems to me these are all using different methods of
    > identifying the partition.
    >
    > How do I convince Windows setup to reinstall Windows?


    You should always use a Windows tool to create a Windows partition. Bear
    in mind there is very few tools for Linux that can write to NTFS
    partititions reliably.
    Rob J, Oct 3, 2005
    #3
  4. -=rjh=-

    -=rjh=- Guest

    Mercury wrote:
    > the correct way to do this is to do a repair install of windows.
    > see www.michaelstevenstech.com for details.
    > you will need all laptop drivers at hand.


    How? As I said in the OP - Windows setup can't see any existing
    installations to repair! Hence my question.

    TA


    >
    > "-=rjh=-" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>I want to transfer an existing working W2K installation to a replacement
    >>system (laptop). I do not want to install from scratch - and if it comes to
    >>that I'll almost certainly install Linux again. The hardware is almost
    >>identical, AFAIK the only difference is, the CPU is 50MHz slower on the
    >>replacement system. I don't want to swap the drives over.
    >>
    >>I have used Knoppix and Partimage to create and restore the relevant
    >>partition to the replacement system, set that partition active, etc. It
    >>boots but fails after the login prompt. Data visible on the restored
    >>filesystem looks about right. I figure that reinstalling Windows over the
    >>top of the existing system has a chance of fixing the problem.
    >>
    >>But, windows setup can't indentify the partition (gives type as
    >>"unknown"), and will only offer to delete and create a new partition to
    >>install windows on.
    >>
    >>Partition Magic sees the partition as ext2; Linux sees it as ntfs. BartPE
    >>doesn't see anything, but I haven't used it before so that might be
    >>normal. Seems to me these are all using different methods of identifying
    >>the partition.
    >>
    >>How do I convince Windows setup to reinstall Windows?
    >>
    >>Any other strategies to deal with this?
    >>
    >>TIA

    >
    >
    >
    -=rjh=-, Oct 3, 2005
    #4
  5. -=rjh=-

    -=rjh=- Guest

    Rob J wrote:
    > In article <>, says...
    >
    >>I want to transfer an existing working W2K installation to a replacement
    >>system (laptop). I do not want to install from scratch - and if it comes
    >>to that I'll almost certainly install Linux again. The hardware is
    >>almost identical, AFAIK the only difference is, the CPU is 50MHz slower
    >>on the replacement system. I don't want to swap the drives over.
    >>
    >>I have used Knoppix and Partimage to create and restore the relevant
    >>partition to the replacement system, set that partition active, etc. It
    >>boots but fails after the login prompt. Data visible on the restored
    >>filesystem looks about right. I figure that reinstalling Windows over
    >>the top of the existing system has a chance of fixing the problem.
    >>
    >>But, windows setup can't indentify the partition (gives type as
    >>"unknown"), and will only offer to delete and create a new partition to
    >>install windows on.
    >>
    >>Partition Magic sees the partition as ext2; Linux sees it as ntfs.
    >>BartPE doesn't see anything, but I haven't used it before so that might
    >>be normal. Seems to me these are all using different methods of
    >>identifying the partition.
    >>
    >>How do I convince Windows setup to reinstall Windows?

    >
    >
    > You should always use a Windows tool to create a Windows partition. Bear
    > in mind there is very few tools for Linux that can write to NTFS
    > partititions reliably.


    Not possible to use a windows tool - the partimage image creates the
    filesystem type into an empty unformatted partition. Much like ghost
    (which I would probably use if it worked on this particular setup). NTFS
    support in partimage is experimental, but all the same, everything has
    been copied over. I think I've got a very good chance of this being
    successful if I can get the last piece to the puzzle.
    -=rjh=-, Oct 3, 2005
    #5
  6. -=rjh=-

    AD. Guest

    On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 09:22:23 +1300, -=rjh=- wrote:

    > Partition Magic sees the partition as ext2; Linux sees it as ntfs. BartPE
    > doesn't see anything, but I haven't used it before so that might be
    > normal. Seems to me these are all using different methods of identifying
    > the partition.


    What in Linux is seeing it as NTFS? It might be reporting the filesystem
    type rather than the partition type.

    From knoppix run cfdisk (I'm not sure whether knoppix has cfdisk, but it
    should), and check the patition type.

    I think the type should be 07 for either HPFS or NTFS. If it is something
    else eg 83 for a Linux partition - cfdisk can change it for you.

    But I have a feeling that changing the partition type might lose the data
    on it. Do you have any way of recopying the data without recopying the old
    partition type?

    More info:
    http://www.win.tue.nl/~aeb/partitions/partition_types-1.html

    --
    Cheers
    Anton
    AD., Oct 3, 2005
    #6
  7. -=rjh=-

    -=rjh=- Guest

    AD. wrote:
    > On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 09:22:23 +1300, -=rjh=- wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Partition Magic sees the partition as ext2; Linux sees it as ntfs. BartPE
    >>doesn't see anything, but I haven't used it before so that might be
    >>normal. Seems to me these are all using different methods of identifying
    >>the partition.

    >
    >
    > What in Linux is seeing it as NTFS? It might be reporting the filesystem
    > type rather than the partition type.


    Good point. QTParted sees ntfs, but cfdisk and fdisk see ext2.
    >
    > From knoppix run cfdisk (I'm not sure whether knoppix has cfdisk, but it
    > should), and check the patition type.
    >
    > I think the type should be 07 for either HPFS or NTFS. If it is something
    > else eg 83 for a Linux partition - cfdisk can change it for you.


    That is a big step - Windows setup now sees that installation
    (previously only the console could see it) but repairing the
    installation using the install CD doesn't fix the problem. Bugger.
    >
    > But I have a feeling that changing the partition type might lose the data
    > on it.


    No, it doesn't. Besides, the data in partitions exists independently of
    the partition table, I've recovered multiple partitions (fat32, hpfs and
    ext2) on a disk when the partition table got zeroed, by using findpart
    (IIRC) so this situation shouldn't be any different.

    > Do you have any way of recopying the data without recopying the old
    > partition type?


    I can always just dump out the whole contents of the filesystem as a
    copy of the files to a fileserver or USB drive. Could even use xxcopy.
    Not sure how I get from there to a working installation of w2k, although
    xxcopy can also be used for this in FAT systems.

    So thanks, a bit of progress, this now looks like a pure Windows problem
    rather than a disk/partition problem now.

    I really hate the way you can't just pick everything up from one system
    and easily put it on a new one. Data isn't the problem, it is all the
    configuration and installed programs that are a pain. It is better in
    Linux, but even then it isn't as easy as it should be.

    It is a major disincentive for upgrading both hardware and software.
    -=rjh=-, Oct 4, 2005
    #7
  8. -=rjh=-

    Rob J Guest

    In article <>, says...
    > Rob J wrote:
    > > In article <>, says...
    > >
    > >>I want to transfer an existing working W2K installation to a replacement
    > >>system (laptop). I do not want to install from scratch - and if it comes
    > >>to that I'll almost certainly install Linux again. The hardware is
    > >>almost identical, AFAIK the only difference is, the CPU is 50MHz slower
    > >>on the replacement system. I don't want to swap the drives over.
    > >>
    > >>I have used Knoppix and Partimage to create and restore the relevant
    > >>partition to the replacement system, set that partition active, etc. It
    > >>boots but fails after the login prompt. Data visible on the restored
    > >>filesystem looks about right. I figure that reinstalling Windows over
    > >>the top of the existing system has a chance of fixing the problem.
    > >>
    > >>But, windows setup can't indentify the partition (gives type as
    > >>"unknown"), and will only offer to delete and create a new partition to
    > >>install windows on.
    > >>
    > >>Partition Magic sees the partition as ext2; Linux sees it as ntfs.
    > >>BartPE doesn't see anything, but I haven't used it before so that might
    > >>be normal. Seems to me these are all using different methods of
    > >>identifying the partition.
    > >>
    > >>How do I convince Windows setup to reinstall Windows?

    > >
    > >
    > > You should always use a Windows tool to create a Windows partition. Bear
    > > in mind there is very few tools for Linux that can write to NTFS
    > > partititions reliably.

    >
    > Not possible to use a windows tool - the partimage image creates the
    > filesystem type into an empty unformatted partition. Much like ghost
    > (which I would probably use if it worked on this particular setup). NTFS
    > support in partimage is experimental, but all the same, everything has
    > been copied over. I think I've got a very good chance of this being
    > successful if I can get the last piece to the puzzle.


    Every Linux tool I have looked at emphasises this point. Use a Linux
    tool to create Linux partitions and a Windows tool to create Windows
    partitions.

    BartPE should be able to see a Windows partition (using Windows). I
    think you have the problem that Partition Magic can't see it as the
    correct type either. This points to your Linux tool being wrong.

    The next problem you may get - AFTER you get the partition table working
    - is a different HAL on the target system. If this happens the repair
    installation would probably be necessary.
    Rob J, Oct 4, 2005
    #8
  9. -=rjh=-

    Rob J Guest

    In article <>, says...

    > I can always just dump out the whole contents of the filesystem as a
    > copy of the files to a fileserver or USB drive. Could even use xxcopy.
    > Not sure how I get from there to a working installation of w2k, although
    > xxcopy can also be used for this in FAT systems.
    >
    > So thanks, a bit of progress, this now looks like a pure Windows problem
    > rather than a disk/partition problem now.
    >
    > I really hate the way you can't just pick everything up from one system
    > and easily put it on a new one. Data isn't the problem, it is all the
    > configuration and installed programs that are a pain. It is better in
    > Linux, but even then it isn't as easy as it should be.


    It's quite possible with Ghost and the Windows volume license tools,
    such as SYSPREP, to perform this.

    Assuming that Linux tools that do not have full NTFS support can perform
    this satisfactorily is a big question mark.

    >
    > It is a major disincentive for upgrading both hardware and software.


    The majority of Windows licenses are OEM. A new system is almost always
    purchased with the current version of Windows as OEM, in this case this
    will be XP so you can migrate up to XP with reinstallation without too
    much trouble - it's a once only step.

    If your old system includes the OEM licensed Win2K but the new system
    does not have any OS license this is a breach of license conditions -
    the new system must have an OS license of its own.
    Rob J, Oct 4, 2005
    #9
  10. -=rjh=-

    AD. Guest

    On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 13:08:33 +1300, -=rjh=- wrote:

    > That is a big step - Windows setup now sees that installation
    > (previously only the console could see it)


    Cool

    > but repairing the installation using the install CD doesn't fix the
    > problem. Bugger.


    Not so cool. What is the problem? Is Windows not booting off that
    partition?

    Have you tried fixmbr and/or fixboot from the recovery console? Apart from
    that I'm lost for ideas - my Windows recovery skills are now pretty rusty,
    I might even have forgotten the correct name of those two commands :)

    --
    Cheers
    Anton
    AD., Oct 4, 2005
    #10
  11. -=rjh=-

    Tim Guest

    You also said you were going into the GUI - repair does not go into the GUI
    until it has finished - after a reboot.

    Would you care to explain why you can't use Ghost since you seem to have it?

    I am not surprised that Repair is not seeing a Windows system if the various
    tools can't consistently see the correct partition type either.

    Is the input HDD smaller than the output?
    If so, then why not use Ghost to process the whole disc. or a HDD vendor
    'copy disc' tool?
    Ghost is (IMHO) notorious for omitting support for something that is already
    out in the market and requiring you to buy an upgrade (which is why refuse
    to buy it), so one of the various other popular disc imaging tools should be
    OK if ghost for example does not like the NTFS version on your HDD. (I am
    sure they hard code these limits in to force you to buy upgrades which are
    always slow and late - that makes them a scurilous vendor in my books and
    one that will always be of last resort). Drive Image did not have these
    issues - but then Symantec bought them out and wiped them out... bastards.

    First step I would make would be to use Windows tools.





    "-=rjh=-" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Mercury wrote:
    >> the correct way to do this is to do a repair install of windows.
    >> see www.michaelstevenstech.com for details.
    >> you will need all laptop drivers at hand.

    >
    > How? As I said in the OP - Windows setup can't see any existing
    > installations to repair! Hence my question.
    >
    > TA
    >
    >
    >>
    >> "-=rjh=-" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>>I want to transfer an existing working W2K installation to a replacement
    >>>system (laptop). I do not want to install from scratch - and if it comes
    >>>to that I'll almost certainly install Linux again. The hardware is almost
    >>>identical, AFAIK the only difference is, the CPU is 50MHz slower on the
    >>>replacement system. I don't want to swap the drives over.
    >>>
    >>>I have used Knoppix and Partimage to create and restore the relevant
    >>>partition to the replacement system, set that partition active, etc. It
    >>>boots but fails after the login prompt. Data visible on the restored
    >>>filesystem looks about right. I figure that reinstalling Windows over the
    >>>top of the existing system has a chance of fixing the problem.
    >>>
    >>>But, windows setup can't indentify the partition (gives type as
    >>>"unknown"), and will only offer to delete and create a new partition to
    >>>install windows on.
    >>>
    >>>Partition Magic sees the partition as ext2; Linux sees it as ntfs. BartPE
    >>>doesn't see anything, but I haven't used it before so that might be
    >>>normal. Seems to me these are all using different methods of identifying
    >>>the partition.
    >>>
    >>>How do I convince Windows setup to reinstall Windows?
    >>>
    >>>Any other strategies to deal with this?
    >>>
    >>>TIA

    >>
    >>
    Tim, Oct 4, 2005
    #11
  12. -=rjh=-

    Alan Guest

    "-=rjh=-" <> wrote in message
    news:
    > I want to transfer an existing working W2K installation to a
    > replacement system (laptop). I do not want to install from scratch -
    > and if it comes to that I'll almost certainly install Linux again.
    > The hardware is almost identical, AFAIK the only difference is, the
    > CPU is 50MHz slower on the replacement system. I don't want to swap
    > the drives over.
    >
    > I have used Knoppix and Partimage to create and restore the relevant
    > partition to the replacement system, set that partition active, etc.
    > It boots but fails after the login prompt. Data visible on the
    > restored filesystem looks about right. I figure that reinstalling
    > Windows over the top of the existing system has a chance of fixing
    > the problem.
    >
    > But, windows setup can't indentify the partition (gives type as
    > "unknown"), and will only offer to delete and create a new partition
    > to install windows on.
    >
    > Partition Magic sees the partition as ext2; Linux sees it as ntfs.
    > BartPE doesn't see anything, but I haven't used it before so that
    > might be normal. Seems to me these are all using different methods

    of
    > identifying the partition.
    >
    > How do I convince Windows setup to reinstall Windows?
    >
    > Any other strategies to deal with this?
    >
    > TIA



    Hi,

    Not sure if this will help, but just in case:

    Windows XP includes a way to transfer files and settings from an old
    computer to a new computer.

    Go to Start -> All Programs -> Accessories -> System Tools -> Files
    and Settings Transfer Wizard.

    Not sure how that would work, if at all, under Win2000 though?

    Apologies if it doesn't exist / is no use in Win2000.

    Alan/

    --
    The views expressed are my own, and not those of my employer or anyone
    else associated with me.

    My current valid email address is:



    This is valid as is. It is not munged, or altered at all.

    It will be valid for AT LEAST one month from the date of this post.

    If you are trying to contact me after that time,
    it MAY still be valid, but may also have been
    deactivated due to spam. If so, and you want
    to contact me by email, try searching for a
    more recent post by me to find my current
    email address
    Alan, Oct 4, 2005
    #12
  13. -=rjh=-

    -=rjh=- Guest

    AD. wrote:
    > On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 13:08:33 +1300, -=rjh=- wrote:
    >
    >
    >>That is a big step - Windows setup now sees that installation
    >>(previously only the console could see it)

    >
    >
    > Cool
    >
    >
    >>but repairing the installation using the install CD doesn't fix the
    >>problem. Bugger.

    >
    >
    > Not so cool. What is the problem? Is Windows not booting off that
    > partition?
    >
    > Have you tried fixmbr and/or fixboot from the recovery console? Apart from
    > that I'm lost for ideas - my Windows recovery skills are now pretty rusty,
    > I might even have forgotten the correct name of those two commands :)
    >


    No, you got those names right, although fixboot is XP I think. I'd
    previously used fixmbr to get rid of grub.

    W2K boots fine, but starts to shut down immediately after you login. It
    appears to have the correct drivers for the display at this stage. Mouse
    works, too, as does the pre-login screen saver. In safe mode it behaves
    differently, with a STOP error 0x0000000A pointing to ntoskrnl.exe - the
    MSKB indicates that this could be any one of a large number of issues.
    I'll have to work through them.

    w2k does install and run fine on this system normally, so I'm fairly
    sure it isn't a hardware/memory problem as such. and it runs Knoppix etc
    fine, too.

    This is different from the errors I've seen when hardware doesn't match
    the HAL setup.

    Repairing using the installation media doesn't make any difference to
    the situation.
    -=rjh=-, Oct 4, 2005
    #13
  14. -=rjh=-

    -=rjh=- Guest

    Tim wrote:
    > You also said you were going into the GUI - repair does not go into the GUI
    > until it has finished - after a reboot.


    Two separate scenarios. Booting normally, the system gets as far as
    logon, mouse works fine, resolution appears correct, but explorer fails
    to start. No error messages.

    Booting to recovery console or repair from installation media is second
    scenario. In that situation it never boots to a gui.

    >
    > Would you care to explain why you can't use Ghost since you seem to have it?
    >

    Sure - it is an older version, it gets 98% through making an image,
    stops with an error message "unable to flush buffer, image may be
    corrupted", continues and reports image was successfully generated,
    installation of image to new system fails at 50% no error messages.

    > I am not surprised that Repair is not seeing a Windows system if the various
    > tools can't consistently see the correct partition type either.
    >

    Sorted. No longer an issue.

    > Is the input HDD smaller than the output?


    Nope. At least, if I understand your terminology.

    The second "new" disk is smaller than the "old" disk. And quieter, too -
    that is why I want to use it. The windows partition does not occupy
    either disk entirely. On both disks there is enough room for a
    compressed filesystem image alongside the operating partition.

    > If so, then why not use Ghost to process the whole disc. or a HDD vendor
    > 'copy disc' tool?


    Driver issues, for a start (network and USB). And I don't want to remove
    the drives if possible.

    Might look for another tool if I get stuck with fixing what I have so far.



    > Ghost is (IMHO) notorious for omitting support for something that is already
    > out in the market and requiring you to buy an upgrade (which is why refuse
    > to buy it), so one of the various other popular disc imaging tools should be
    > OK if ghost for example does not like the NTFS version on your HDD. (I am
    > sure they hard code these limits in to force you to buy upgrades which are
    > always slow and late - that makes them a scurilous vendor in my books and
    > one that will always be of last resort). Drive Image did not have these
    > issues - but then Symantec bought them out and wiped them out... bastards.
    >
    > First step I would make would be to use Windows tools.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "-=rjh=-" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>Mercury wrote:
    >>
    >>>the correct way to do this is to do a repair install of windows.
    >>>see www.michaelstevenstech.com for details.
    >>>you will need all laptop drivers at hand.

    >>
    >>How? As I said in the OP - Windows setup can't see any existing
    >>installations to repair! Hence my question.
    >>
    >>TA
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>"-=rjh=-" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I want to transfer an existing working W2K installation to a replacement
    >>>>system (laptop). I do not want to install from scratch - and if it comes
    >>>>to that I'll almost certainly install Linux again. The hardware is almost
    >>>>identical, AFAIK the only difference is, the CPU is 50MHz slower on the
    >>>>replacement system. I don't want to swap the drives over.
    >>>>
    >>>>I have used Knoppix and Partimage to create and restore the relevant
    >>>>partition to the replacement system, set that partition active, etc. It
    >>>>boots but fails after the login prompt. Data visible on the restored
    >>>>filesystem looks about right. I figure that reinstalling Windows over the
    >>>>top of the existing system has a chance of fixing the problem.
    >>>>
    >>>>But, windows setup can't indentify the partition (gives type as
    >>>>"unknown"), and will only offer to delete and create a new partition to
    >>>>install windows on.
    >>>>
    >>>>Partition Magic sees the partition as ext2; Linux sees it as ntfs. BartPE
    >>>>doesn't see anything, but I haven't used it before so that might be
    >>>>normal. Seems to me these are all using different methods of identifying
    >>>>the partition.
    >>>>
    >>>>How do I convince Windows setup to reinstall Windows?
    >>>>
    >>>>Any other strategies to deal with this?
    >>>>
    >>>>TIA
    >>>
    >>>

    >
    -=rjh=-, Oct 4, 2005
    #14
  15. -=rjh=-

    Mercury Guest

    This is probably a device driver issue.

    STOP 0x0A IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL

    Go into safe mode and disable all optional device drivers EG network and
    anything *specific* to your prior install, set the display driver to VGA
    (fix that later, it'll look puke) and try again.

    Uninstall h/w that you Know is specific to the prior machine.

    try again. if you get a BSOD again and its still 0x0A, the in the BSOD
    screenlook for the first mentioned .sys file - this is probably the driver
    (it can be a victim), and if you now the deive concerned go back into safe
    mode and disable or uninstall it.

    If you get a different BSOD (EG the system becomes well and truly stuffed)
    you can use Last Known Good to undo the changes for devices you have
    disabled...

    Best Of Luck...




    "-=rjh=-" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > AD. wrote:
    >> On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 13:08:33 +1300, -=rjh=- wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>That is a big step - Windows setup now sees that installation
    >>>(previously only the console could see it)

    >>
    >>
    >> Cool
    >>
    >>
    >>>but repairing the installation using the install CD doesn't fix the
    >>>problem. Bugger.

    >>
    >>
    >> Not so cool. What is the problem? Is Windows not booting off that
    >> partition?
    >>
    >> Have you tried fixmbr and/or fixboot from the recovery console? Apart
    >> from
    >> that I'm lost for ideas - my Windows recovery skills are now pretty
    >> rusty,
    >> I might even have forgotten the correct name of those two commands :)
    >>

    >
    > No, you got those names right, although fixboot is XP I think. I'd
    > previously used fixmbr to get rid of grub.
    >
    > W2K boots fine, but starts to shut down immediately after you login. It
    > appears to have the correct drivers for the display at this stage. Mouse
    > works, too, as does the pre-login screen saver. In safe mode it behaves
    > differently, with a STOP error 0x0000000A pointing to ntoskrnl.exe - the
    > MSKB indicates that this could be any one of a large number of issues.
    > I'll have to work through them.
    >
    > w2k does install and run fine on this system normally, so I'm fairly sure
    > it isn't a hardware/memory problem as such. and it runs Knoppix etc fine,
    > too.
    >
    > This is different from the errors I've seen when hardware doesn't match
    > the HAL setup.
    >
    > Repairing using the installation media doesn't make any difference to the
    > situation.
    Mercury, Oct 4, 2005
    #15
  16. -=rjh=-

    -=rjh=- Guest

    Alan wrote:
    > "-=rjh=-" <> wrote in message
    > news:
    >
    >>I want to transfer an existing working W2K installation to a
    >>replacement system (laptop). I do not want to install from scratch -
    >>and if it comes to that I'll almost certainly install Linux again.
    >>The hardware is almost identical, AFAIK the only difference is, the
    >>CPU is 50MHz slower on the replacement system. I don't want to swap
    >>the drives over.
    >>
    >>I have used Knoppix and Partimage to create and restore the relevant
    >>partition to the replacement system, set that partition active, etc.
    >>It boots but fails after the login prompt. Data visible on the
    >>restored filesystem looks about right. I figure that reinstalling
    >>Windows over the top of the existing system has a chance of fixing
    >>the problem.
    >>
    >>But, windows setup can't indentify the partition (gives type as
    >>"unknown"), and will only offer to delete and create a new partition
    >>to install windows on.
    >>
    >>Partition Magic sees the partition as ext2; Linux sees it as ntfs.
    >>BartPE doesn't see anything, but I haven't used it before so that
    >>might be normal. Seems to me these are all using different methods

    >
    > of
    >
    >>identifying the partition.
    >>
    >>How do I convince Windows setup to reinstall Windows?
    >>
    >>Any other strategies to deal with this?
    >>
    >>TIA

    >
    >
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > Not sure if this will help, but just in case:
    >
    > Windows XP includes a way to transfer files and settings from an old
    > computer to a new computer.
    >
    > Go to Start -> All Programs -> Accessories -> System Tools -> Files
    > and Settings Transfer Wizard.
    >
    > Not sure how that would work, if at all, under Win2000 though?
    >
    > Apologies if it doesn't exist / is no use in Win2000.


    No, doesn't seem to exist in W2k. But it will transfer settings from a
    w2k system to an XP one.

    It looks like a good idea, but limited in what it will transfer across -
    settings for the OS, internet access, and some MS applications, and some
    data as well and some other stuff; but not a wholesale pick up this
    system here and dump it there approach.

    I'm pretty sure it would miss my installed programs and data that gets
    stored in obscure places. I don't understand why Windows lets
    applications manage user data in the /program files directory.
    -=rjh=-, Oct 4, 2005
    #16
  17. -=rjh=-

    -=rjh=- Guest

    Mercury wrote:
    > This is probably a device driver issue.


    Seems likely. Strange - identical hardware.
    >
    > STOP 0x0A IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
    >
    > Go into safe mode and disable all optional device drivers EG network and
    > anything *specific* to your prior install, set the display driver to VGA
    > (fix that later, it'll look puke) and try again.


    Tried all the safe mode options, no result. I'll have to look at the
    boot log.

    >
    > Uninstall h/w that you Know is specific to the prior machine.


    Two identical laptops?
    >
    > try again. if you get a BSOD again and its still 0x0A, the in the BSOD
    > screenlook for the first mentioned .sys file - this is probably the driver
    > (it can be a victim), and if you now the deive concerned go back into safe
    > mode and disable or uninstall it.


    always ntoskrnl.exe - don't think I can disable it :)

    >
    > If you get a different BSOD (EG the system becomes well and truly stuffed)
    > you can use Last Known Good to undo the changes for devices you have
    > disabled...


    Nah, I'll just install Suse...

    >
    > Best Of Luck...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "-=rjh=-" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>AD. wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 13:08:33 +1300, -=rjh=- wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>That is a big step - Windows setup now sees that installation
    >>>>(previously only the console could see it)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Cool
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>but repairing the installation using the install CD doesn't fix the
    >>>>problem. Bugger.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Not so cool. What is the problem? Is Windows not booting off that
    >>>partition?
    >>>
    >>>Have you tried fixmbr and/or fixboot from the recovery console? Apart
    >>>from
    >>>that I'm lost for ideas - my Windows recovery skills are now pretty
    >>>rusty,
    >>>I might even have forgotten the correct name of those two commands :)
    >>>

    >>
    >>No, you got those names right, although fixboot is XP I think. I'd
    >>previously used fixmbr to get rid of grub.
    >>
    >>W2K boots fine, but starts to shut down immediately after you login. It
    >>appears to have the correct drivers for the display at this stage. Mouse
    >>works, too, as does the pre-login screen saver. In safe mode it behaves
    >>differently, with a STOP error 0x0000000A pointing to ntoskrnl.exe - the
    >>MSKB indicates that this could be any one of a large number of issues.
    >>I'll have to work through them.
    >>
    >>w2k does install and run fine on this system normally, so I'm fairly sure
    >>it isn't a hardware/memory problem as such. and it runs Knoppix etc fine,
    >>too.
    >>
    >>This is different from the errors I've seen when hardware doesn't match
    >>the HAL setup.
    >>
    >>Repairing using the installation media doesn't make any difference to the
    >>situation.

    >
    >
    >
    -=rjh=-, Oct 4, 2005
    #17
  18. -=rjh=-

    Mercury Guest

    are there any h/wdevices disabled in the bios? a shoddy driver may be set to
    start without a functioning device...

    ntoskrnl reports the error, it is the .sys file first listed that is the
    clue.
    "in the BSOD screenlook for the first mentioned .sys "

    "Two identical laptops?" motherboard revsions sometimes include different
    chips / different version chips. EG sound & network chips often change.

    "-=rjh=-" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Mercury wrote:
    >> This is probably a device driver issue.

    >
    > Seems likely. Strange - identical hardware.
    >>
    >> STOP 0x0A IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
    >>
    >> Go into safe mode and disable all optional device drivers EG network and
    >> anything *specific* to your prior install, set the display driver to VGA
    >> (fix that later, it'll look puke) and try again.

    >
    > Tried all the safe mode options, no result. I'll have to look at the boot
    > log.
    >
    >>
    >> Uninstall h/w that you Know is specific to the prior machine.

    >
    > Two identical laptops?
    >>
    >> try again. if you get a BSOD again and its still 0x0A, the in the BSOD
    >> screenlook for the first mentioned .sys file - this is probably the
    >> driver (it can be a victim), and if you now the deive concerned go back
    >> into safe mode and disable or uninstall it.

    >
    > always ntoskrnl.exe - don't think I can disable it :)
    >
    >>
    >> If you get a different BSOD (EG the system becomes well and truly
    >> stuffed) you can use Last Known Good to undo the changes for devices you
    >> have disabled...

    >
    > Nah, I'll just install Suse...
    >
    >>
    >> Best Of Luck...
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "-=rjh=-" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>>AD. wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 13:08:33 +1300, -=rjh=- wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>That is a big step - Windows setup now sees that installation
    >>>>>(previously only the console could see it)
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Cool
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>but repairing the installation using the install CD doesn't fix the
    >>>>>problem. Bugger.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Not so cool. What is the problem? Is Windows not booting off that
    >>>>partition?
    >>>>
    >>>>Have you tried fixmbr and/or fixboot from the recovery console? Apart
    >>>>from
    >>>>that I'm lost for ideas - my Windows recovery skills are now pretty
    >>>>rusty,
    >>>>I might even have forgotten the correct name of those two commands :)
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>No, you got those names right, although fixboot is XP I think. I'd
    >>>previously used fixmbr to get rid of grub.
    >>>
    >>>W2K boots fine, but starts to shut down immediately after you login. It
    >>>appears to have the correct drivers for the display at this stage. Mouse
    >>>works, too, as does the pre-login screen saver. In safe mode it behaves
    >>>differently, with a STOP error 0x0000000A pointing to ntoskrnl.exe - the
    >>>MSKB indicates that this could be any one of a large number of issues.
    >>>I'll have to work through them.
    >>>
    >>>w2k does install and run fine on this system normally, so I'm fairly sure
    >>>it isn't a hardware/memory problem as such. and it runs Knoppix etc fine,
    >>>too.
    >>>
    >>>This is different from the errors I've seen when hardware doesn't match
    >>>the HAL setup.
    >>>
    >>>Repairing using the installation media doesn't make any difference to the
    >>>situation.

    >>
    >>
    Mercury, Oct 4, 2005
    #18
  19. -=rjh=-

    Mercury Guest

    you can download the file and settings transfer wizard from
    www.microsoft.com
    it is a good idea to do so as they add new things to it...

    "-=rjh=-" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Alan wrote:
    >> "-=rjh=-" <> wrote in message
    >> news:
    >>
    >>>I want to transfer an existing working W2K installation to a
    >>>replacement system (laptop). I do not want to install from scratch -
    >>>and if it comes to that I'll almost certainly install Linux again.
    >>>The hardware is almost identical, AFAIK the only difference is, the
    >>>CPU is 50MHz slower on the replacement system. I don't want to swap
    >>>the drives over.
    >>>
    >>>I have used Knoppix and Partimage to create and restore the relevant
    >>>partition to the replacement system, set that partition active, etc.
    >>>It boots but fails after the login prompt. Data visible on the
    >>>restored filesystem looks about right. I figure that reinstalling
    >>>Windows over the top of the existing system has a chance of fixing
    >>>the problem.
    >>>
    >>>But, windows setup can't indentify the partition (gives type as
    >>>"unknown"), and will only offer to delete and create a new partition
    >>>to install windows on.
    >>>
    >>>Partition Magic sees the partition as ext2; Linux sees it as ntfs.
    >>>BartPE doesn't see anything, but I haven't used it before so that
    >>>might be normal. Seems to me these are all using different methods

    >>
    >> of
    >>
    >>>identifying the partition.
    >>>
    >>>How do I convince Windows setup to reinstall Windows?
    >>>
    >>>Any other strategies to deal with this?
    >>>
    >>>TIA

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> Not sure if this will help, but just in case:
    >>
    >> Windows XP includes a way to transfer files and settings from an old
    >> computer to a new computer.
    >>
    >> Go to Start -> All Programs -> Accessories -> System Tools -> Files
    >> and Settings Transfer Wizard.
    >>
    >> Not sure how that would work, if at all, under Win2000 though?
    >>
    >> Apologies if it doesn't exist / is no use in Win2000.

    >
    > No, doesn't seem to exist in W2k. But it will transfer settings from a w2k
    > system to an XP one.
    >
    > It looks like a good idea, but limited in what it will transfer across -
    > settings for the OS, internet access, and some MS applications, and some
    > data as well and some other stuff; but not a wholesale pick up this system
    > here and dump it there approach.
    >
    > I'm pretty sure it would miss my installed programs and data that gets
    > stored in obscure places. I don't understand why Windows lets applications
    > manage user data in the /program files directory.
    Mercury, Oct 4, 2005
    #19
  20. -=rjh=-

    Rob J Guest

    In article <43422442$>, says...
    > Rob J wrote:
    > > In article <>, says...
    > >
    > >
    > >>I can always just dump out the whole contents of the filesystem as a
    > >>copy of the files to a fileserver or USB drive. Could even use xxcopy.
    > >>Not sure how I get from there to a working installation of w2k, although
    > >>xxcopy can also be used for this in FAT systems.
    > >>
    > >>So thanks, a bit of progress, this now looks like a pure Windows problem
    > >>rather than a disk/partition problem now.
    > >>
    > >>I really hate the way you can't just pick everything up from one system
    > >>and easily put it on a new one. Data isn't the problem, it is all the
    > >>configuration and installed programs that are a pain. It is better in
    > >>Linux, but even then it isn't as easy as it should be.

    > >
    > >
    > > It's quite possible with Ghost and the Windows volume license tools,
    > > such as SYSPREP, to perform this.

    >
    > Yup, but a couple of points about that.
    >
    > 1: Ghost and sysprep aren't exactly "as easy as it should be" :)
    > 2: That being said, they are ideal for large installations or situations
    > where the process is well understood and used often enough to be worth
    > the trouble.
    > 3: But most home users will buy a new system and install everything from
    > scratch. In many cases I've seen, they even *expect* to lose their data
    > as part of the process! They'll happily re-enter all the data into their
    > address books. AFAIK there isn't an easy idiot proof tool to move data,
    > applications and configuration from one system to another. Given that
    > many system have CD or DVD writers in them, this shouldn't be too hard
    > to do.


    Every software app has a method to import data from somewhere else.


    > 4: AFAIK I shouldn't need to use sysprep because the hardware is almost
    > identical.
    >
    > WinFS and Vista will be interesting. How do people migrate everything
    > onto Vista, and once they've started using WinFS extensively, how do
    > they get their data off it and onto the next system?


    WinFS is not a filesystem, it is indexing of the files.
    Rob J, Oct 4, 2005
    #20
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