Changing OS ownership?

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Guest, Apr 3, 2004.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Can one legally transfer a copy of Windows (2000 upgrade, for instance) to
    another person if they have stopped using it on their own machines?

    Howzabout in the not-so-legally sense, is there any practical problems
    involved in using an OS that someone else used but is not using any more?



    Thanks
     
    Guest, Apr 3, 2004
    #1
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  2. Guest

    Michael-NC Guest

    Don't worry about it. You're fine. The OS license is supposed to be
    installed on 1 machine. Some licenses let you install the OS on a laptop as
    well. As long as you have the license, you own it.

    "<62>" <> wrote in message
    news:D...
    > Can one legally transfer a copy of Windows (2000 upgrade, for instance) to
    > another person if they have stopped using it on their own machines?
    >
    > Howzabout in the not-so-legally sense, is there any practical problems
    > involved in using an OS that someone else used but is not using any more?
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
     
    Michael-NC, Apr 3, 2004
    #2
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  3. > As long as you have the license, you own it.

    That works with OS's pre XP but this activation stuff from Micro$oft really
    means they own it. They won't even allow major upgrades much less moving
    the OS to another PC.
     
    Russell Keller, Apr 8, 2004
    #3
  4. Guest

    Thor Guest

    "Russell Keller" <> wrote in message
    news:rp6dc.19683$...
    > > As long as you have the license, you own it.

    >
    > That works with OS's pre XP but this activation stuff from Micro$oft

    really
    > means they own it. They won't even allow major upgrades much less moving
    > the OS to another PC.


    That's not correct. It may require a phone call to MS to get it activated,
    but they do allow transfer of the OS to another machine, and also major
    upgrades.
     
    Thor, Apr 8, 2004
    #4
  5. Guest

    DeMoN LaG Guest

    "Thor" <> wrote in news::

    > "Russell Keller" <> wrote in message
    > news:rp6dc.19683$...
    >> > As long as you have the license, you own it.

    >>
    >> That works with OS's pre XP but this activation stuff from Micro$oft

    > really
    >> means they own it. They won't even allow major upgrades much less
    >> moving the OS to another PC.

    >
    > That's not correct. It may require a phone call to MS to get it
    > activated, but they do allow transfer of the OS to another machine,
    > and also major upgrades.
    >


    Just another example of clueless newbies passing off horror stories and
    things they heard from more informed people and didn't understand as facts.
    XP allows you to do anything you could do with previous Windows OS
    licenses. Just if you go and install a new HD, motherboard, RAM, and video
    card, then you will have to give them a call and let them know and they
    will give you an activation code. This just prevents people from
    downloading a pirated copy and using it for 10 machines in their house.

    --
    website: http://www.demonlag.com
    AIM: FrznFoodClerk
     
    DeMoN LaG, Apr 8, 2004
    #5
  6. Guest

    Night_Seer Guest

    Russell Keller wrote:
    >> As long as you have the license, you own it.

    >
    > That works with OS's pre XP but this activation stuff from Micro$oft
    > really means they own it. They won't even allow major upgrades much
    > less moving the OS to another PC.


    They allow anything any of the other OS's allowed, you just have the
    inconvinience of calling in to get a new authorization code. Or if you
    wait 6 months to install new hardware, the authorization is reset, and
    doesn't force you to call in.

    --
    Night_Seer
     
    Night_Seer, Apr 8, 2004
    #6
  7. Guest

    John Guest

    On 08 Apr 2004 17:36:47 GMT, DeMoN LaG wrote:

    > "Thor" <> wrote in news::
    >
    >> "Russell Keller" <> wrote in message
    >> news:rp6dc.19683$...
    >>> > As long as you have the license, you own it.
    >>>
    >>> That works with OS's pre XP but this activation stuff from Micro$oft

    >> really
    >>> means they own it. They won't even allow major upgrades much less
    >>> moving the OS to another PC.

    >>
    >> That's not correct. It may require a phone call to MS to get it
    >> activated, but they do allow transfer of the OS to another machine,
    >> and also major upgrades.
    >>

    >
    > Just another example of clueless newbies passing off horror stories and
    > things they heard from more informed people and didn't understand as facts.
    > XP allows you to do anything you could do with previous Windows OS
    > licenses. Just if you go and install a new HD, motherboard, RAM, and video
    > card, then you will have to give them a call and let them know and they
    > will give you an activation code. This just prevents people from
    > downloading a pirated copy and using it for 10 machines in their house.


    I have Windows XP Home oem version installed on my computer since the
    machine was new two years ago.
    I am thinking of upgrading both the motherboard and CPU, but have been
    told that to do this I would need a to purchase a new copy of Windows
    XP. This information came from an employer of Microsoft.

    Regards,
    John.
     
    John, Apr 9, 2004
    #7
  8. That little bit of into came from my old CompTIA instructor. I'm guessing
    they changed it since I got that info. I read it in the liscence agreement
    and got it right on one of our tests.


    "Thor" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Russell Keller" <> wrote in message
    > news:rp6dc.19683$...
    > > > As long as you have the license, you own it.

    > >
    > > That works with OS's pre XP but this activation stuff from Micro$oft

    > really
    > > means they own it. They won't even allow major upgrades much less

    moving
    > > the OS to another PC.

    >
    > That's not correct. It may require a phone call to MS to get it activated,
    > but they do allow transfer of the OS to another machine, and also major
    > upgrades.
    >
    >
     
    Russell Keller, Apr 9, 2004
    #8
  9. Guest

    Thor Guest

    "Russell Keller" <> wrote in message
    news:gRodc.34680$...
    > That little bit of into came from my old CompTIA instructor. I'm guessing
    > they changed it since I got that info. I read it in the liscence

    agreement
    > and got it right on one of our tests.


    Interesting. This is from the EULA on my copy of XP Pro (bought right after
    it's initial release).

    4. TRANSFER-Internal. You may move the Product to a different
    Workstation Computer. After the transfer, you must
    completely remove the Product from the former Workstation
    Computer. Transfer to Third Party. The initial user of the
    Product may make a one-time transfer of the Product to
    another end user. The transfer has to include all
    component parts, media, printed materials, this EULA, and
    if applicable, the Certificate of Authenticity. The
    transfer may not be an indirect transfer, such as a
    consignment. Prior to the transfer, the end user receiving
    the transferred Product must agree to all the EULA terms.
    No Rental. You may not rent, lease, lend or provide
    commercial hosting services to third parties with the
    Product.


    And this is from the EULA from my copy of XP Home (also bought right after
    initial release)

    4. TRANSFER-Internal. You may move the Product to a different
    Workstation Computer. After the transfer, you must
    completely remove the Product from the former Workstation
    Computer. Transfer to Third Party. The initial user of the
    Product may make a one-time transfer of the Product to
    another end user. The transfer has to include all
    component parts, media, printed materials, this EULA, and
    if applicable, the Certificate of Authenticity. The
    transfer may not be an indirect transfer, such as a
    consignment. Prior to the transfer, the end user receiving
    the transferred Product must agree to all the EULA terms.
    No Rental. You may not rent, lease, lend or provide
    commercial hosting services to third parties with the
    Product.



    I'd say you actually got it wrong, and the test was wrong, and your
    instructor was wrong.
     
    Thor, Apr 9, 2004
    #9
  10. Guest

    Thor Guest

    "John" <> wrote in message
    news:11fz5ff70x23a.17gcwlkz8ftsl$...
    > On 08 Apr 2004 17:36:47 GMT, DeMoN LaG wrote:
    >
    > > "Thor" <> wrote in news::
    > >
    > >> "Russell Keller" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:rp6dc.19683$...
    > >>> > As long as you have the license, you own it.
    > >>>
    > >>> That works with OS's pre XP but this activation stuff from Micro$oft
    > >> really
    > >>> means they own it. They won't even allow major upgrades much less
    > >>> moving the OS to another PC.
    > >>
    > >> That's not correct. It may require a phone call to MS to get it
    > >> activated, but they do allow transfer of the OS to another machine,
    > >> and also major upgrades.
    > >>

    > >
    > > Just another example of clueless newbies passing off horror stories and
    > > things they heard from more informed people and didn't understand as

    facts.
    > > XP allows you to do anything you could do with previous Windows OS
    > > licenses. Just if you go and install a new HD, motherboard, RAM, and

    video
    > > card, then you will have to give them a call and let them know and they
    > > will give you an activation code. This just prevents people from
    > > downloading a pirated copy and using it for 10 machines in their house.

    >
    > I have Windows XP Home oem version installed on my computer since the
    > machine was new two years ago.
    > I am thinking of upgrading both the motherboard and CPU, but have been
    > told that to do this I would need a to purchase a new copy of Windows
    > XP. This information came from an employer of Microsoft.



    You can upgrade the hardware on an OEM XP install, but there may be more
    restrictions (if it came pre-installed from a brand-name builder like Dell,
    Gateway, HP, Compaq, etc). You see, the preinstalled OEM versions are
    usually "married" to a BIOS ID string, that the computer manufacturer places
    there. This allows easy restriction-free upgrades to everything inside the
    computer *except* the motherboard, unless you get an special upgrade board
    from the original PC manufacturer, that contains the same company ID, to
    satisfy that copy of WindowsXP. If you buy an off-the-shelf motherboard
    somewhere, and attempt to reinstall XP from the recovery disc provided by
    the PC manufacturer, it may not work, since it won't find the proper
    manufacturer identifier in the BIOS. Probably the best thing to do in this
    situation is to consult with your PC manufacturer and see what the situation
    will be, and what your upgrade options are. If you have one of the so-called
    "generic" OEM copies of windowsXP (like what a small custom-builder shop
    would likely use, or one you have built yourself), then it will have the
    same activation needs that the retail version has, and it will respond in
    the same way to major upgrades that the retail version does. Meaning, you
    can upgrade the motherboard and other components, but you may simply have to
    re-activate, either online, or via a phonecall to Microsoft if enough items
    are changed.
     
    Thor, Apr 9, 2004
    #10
  11. Guest

    John Guest

    On Fri, 9 Apr 2004 08:47:25 -0400, Thor wrote:

    > "John" <> wrote in message
    > news:11fz5ff70x23a.17gcwlkz8ftsl$...
    >> On 08 Apr 2004 17:36:47 GMT, DeMoN LaG wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Thor" <> wrote in news::
    >>>
    >>>> "Russell Keller" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:rp6dc.19683$...
    >>>>> > As long as you have the license, you own it.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That works with OS's pre XP but this activation stuff from Micro$oft
    >>>> really
    >>>>> means they own it. They won't even allow major upgrades much less
    >>>>> moving the OS to another PC.
    >>>>
    >>>> That's not correct. It may require a phone call to MS to get it
    >>>> activated, but they do allow transfer of the OS to another machine,
    >>>> and also major upgrades.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Just another example of clueless newbies passing off horror stories and
    >>> things they heard from more informed people and didn't understand as

    > facts.
    >>> XP allows you to do anything you could do with previous Windows OS
    >>> licenses. Just if you go and install a new HD, motherboard, RAM, and

    > video
    >>> card, then you will have to give them a call and let them know and they
    >>> will give you an activation code. This just prevents people from
    >>> downloading a pirated copy and using it for 10 machines in their house.

    >>
    >> I have Windows XP Home oem version installed on my computer since the
    >> machine was new two years ago.
    >> I am thinking of upgrading both the motherboard and CPU, but have been
    >> told that to do this I would need a to purchase a new copy of Windows
    >> XP. This information came from an employer of Microsoft.

    >
    >
    > You can upgrade the hardware on an OEM XP install, but there may be more
    > restrictions (if it came pre-installed from a brand-name builder like Dell,
    > Gateway, HP, Compaq, etc). You see, the preinstalled OEM versions are
    > usually "married" to a BIOS ID string, that the computer manufacturer places
    > there. This allows easy restriction-free upgrades to everything inside the
    > computer *except* the motherboard, unless you get an special upgrade board
    > from the original PC manufacturer, that contains the same company ID, to
    > satisfy that copy of WindowsXP. If you buy an off-the-shelf motherboard
    > somewhere, and attempt to reinstall XP from the recovery disc provided by
    > the PC manufacturer, it may not work, since it won't find the proper
    > manufacturer identifier in the BIOS. Probably the best thing to do in this
    > situation is to consult with your PC manufacturer and see what the situation
    > will be, and what your upgrade options are. If you have one of the so-called
    > "generic" OEM copies of windowsXP (like what a small custom-builder shop
    > would likely use, or one you have built yourself), then it will have the
    > same activation needs that the retail version has, and it will respond in
    > the same way to major upgrades that the retail version does. Meaning, you
    > can upgrade the motherboard and other components, but you may simply have to
    > re-activate, either online, or via a phonecall to Microsoft if enough items
    > are changed.


    Thanks for the detailed information.

    The computer was custom built by a local firm...this information has
    eased my mind. I don't mind the expense for upgrading, but the thought
    of buying a new Windows XP when I already owned a copy was getting
    right up my nose:)

    Regards,
    John.
     
    John, Apr 9, 2004
    #11
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