Changing computers

Discussion in 'Firefox' started by wparrish, Jun 18, 2005.

  1. wparrish

    wparrish Guest

    I have purchased a new Del laptop.
    My previous unit was/is a Compact.
    Is there a seamless way of transfering my
    Mozilla T'bird email account(s) from the
    Compact unit to the Del unit?
    Thanks
    William
     
    wparrish, Jun 18, 2005
    #1
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  2. wparrish

    Jowah Guest

    wparrish wrote:
    > I have purchased a new Del laptop.
    > My previous unit was/is a Compact.
    > Is there a seamless way of transfering my
    > Mozilla T'bird email account(s) from the
    > Compact unit to the Del unit?
    > Thanks
    > William
    >


    Copy the files in C:\Documents and Settings\user\Application
    Data\Thunderbird\Profiles\profile to a disk or some other memory storage
    device. Install TB on the Dell, paste your original files to the same
    directory (C:\Documents and Settings\user\Application
    Data\Thunderbird\Profiles), and use the TB profile manager to select
    that profile for use. Start>Run>thunderbird.exe -profilemanager.

    Joe
     
    Jowah, Jun 19, 2005
    #2
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  3. wparrish

    Broadback Guest

    Jowah wrote:

    > wparrish wrote:
    >
    >> I have purchased a new Del laptop.
    >> My previous unit was/is a Compact.
    >> Is there a seamless way of transfering my
    >> Mozilla T'bird email account(s) from the
    >> Compact unit to the Del unit?
    >> Thanks
    >> William
    >>

    >
    > Copy the files in C:\Documents and Settings\user\Application
    > Data\Thunderbird\Profiles\profile to a disk or some other memory storage
    > device. Install TB on the Dell, paste your original files to the same
    > directory (C:\Documents and Settings\user\Application
    > Data\Thunderbird\Profiles), and use the TB profile manager to select
    > that profile for use. Start>Run>thunderbird.exe -profilemanager.
    >
    > Joe

    If both are Windows XP how about using the file transfer facility supplied?
     
    Broadback, Jun 19, 2005
    #3
  4. wparrish

    Jowah Guest

    Broadback wrote:
    > Jowah wrote:
    >
    >> wparrish wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have purchased a new Del laptop.
    >>> My previous unit was/is a Compact.
    >>> Is there a seamless way of transfering my
    >>> Mozilla T'bird email account(s) from the
    >>> Compact unit to the Del unit?
    >>> Thanks
    >>> William
    >>>

    >>
    >> Copy the files in C:\Documents and Settings\user\Application
    >> Data\Thunderbird\Profiles\profile to a disk or some other memory
    >> storage device. Install TB on the Dell, paste your original files to
    >> the same directory (C:\Documents and Settings\user\Application
    >> Data\Thunderbird\Profiles), and use the TB profile manager to select
    >> that profile for use. Start>Run>thunderbird.exe -profilemanager.
    >>
    >> Joe

    >
    > If both are Windows XP how about using the file transfer facility supplied?


    That would work too. So would a laplink, or a standard network
    connection through a router, if their OS's are different.

    Joe
     
    Jowah, Jun 19, 2005
    #4
  5. wparrish

    wparrish Guest

    Joe:
    We have a router, but how would it work?
    I would obviously connect both computers with the router,
    but then what?
    I have never done that.
    Can I transfer 'stuff' directly from one computer to another
    via a router???
    Thanks
    William
     
    wparrish, Jun 19, 2005
    #5
  6. wparrish

    Z Guest

    wparrish wrote:
    > Joe:
    > We have a router, but how would it work?
    > I would obviously connect both computers with the router,
    > but then what?
    > I have never done that.
    > Can I transfer 'stuff' directly from one computer to another
    > via a router???


    Yes, you can also xfr w/o a router, just connect the 2 NICs together
    with a crossover cable.

    It's easier to just use a memory stick or burn a CD, tho.
     
    Z, Jun 19, 2005
    #6
  7. wparrish

    Jowah Guest

    wparrish wrote:
    > Joe:
    > We have a router, but how would it work?
    > I would obviously connect both computers with the router,
    > but then what?
    > I have never done that.
    > Can I transfer 'stuff' directly from one computer to another
    > via a router???
    > Thanks
    > William
    >

    If you already have the two pc's networked, you can transfer files via
    explorer. Just click My Computer, and in the address bar type the name
    of the other computer like this: \\computername\c$ - so if your
    computer name was bob you would type:

    \\bob\c$

    This will show you the contents of the C drive on the other pc. Then
    you can just drag and drop the files you want to transfer. If you are
    not a system administrator it will prompt you for admin credentials
    before it shows you the drive contents. To find the name of the pc
    right click My Computer, select properties, and click the Computer Name
    tab. It will be listed there.

    Joe
     
    Jowah, Jun 20, 2005
    #7
  8. wparrish

    Z Guest

    Jowah wrote:
    > wparrish wrote:
    > If you already have the two pc's networked, you can transfer files via
    > explorer. Just click My Computer, and in the address bar type the name
    > of the other computer like this: \\computername\c$ - so if your
    > computer name was bob you would type:
    >
    > \\bob\c$


    Only if you have file sharing enabled and C: shared.

    And I think the 2 PCs must also be in the same workgroup.
     
    Z, Jun 20, 2005
    #8
  9. wparrish

    Jowah Guest

    Z wrote:
    > Jowah wrote:
    >
    >> wparrish wrote:
    >> If you already have the two pc's networked, you can transfer files via
    >> explorer. Just click My Computer, and in the address bar type the
    >> name of the other computer like this: \\computername\c$ - so if your
    >> computer name was bob you would type:
    >>
    >> \\bob\c$

    >
    >
    > Only if you have file sharing enabled and C: shared.
    >
    > And I think the 2 PCs must also be in the same workgroup.


    Thats true Z. Sorry, should have clarified "networked".
     
    Jowah, Jun 21, 2005
    #9
  10. wparrish

    Pastor Dave Guest

    On Tue, 21 Jun 2005 04:23:56 GMT, Jowah
    <> spake thusly:


    >Z wrote:
    >> Jowah wrote:
    >>
    >>> wparrish wrote:
    >>> If you already have the two pc's networked, you can transfer files via
    >>> explorer. Just click My Computer, and in the address bar type the
    >>> name of the other computer like this: \\computername\c$ - so if your
    >>> computer name was bob you would type:
    >>>
    >>> \\bob\c$

    >>
    >>
    >> Only if you have file sharing enabled and C: shared.
    >>
    >> And I think the 2 PCs must also be in the same workgroup.

    >
    >Thats true Z. Sorry, should have clarified "networked".


    The $ is only applicable, if it is a hidden share and
    you can just go into Explorer and map it as a network
    drive.

    --

    Pastor Dave

    Silence in the Face of Doctrinal Criticism is Suicide

    http://www.ecclesia.org/truth/solution.html

    http://tinyurl.com/ce97m
     
    Pastor Dave, Jun 21, 2005
    #10
  11. wparrish

    Jowah Guest

    Pastor Dave wrote:
    > On Tue, 21 Jun 2005 04:23:56 GMT, Jowah
    > <> spake thusly:
    >
    >
    >
    >>Z wrote:
    >>
    >>>Jowah wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>wparrish wrote:
    >>>>If you already have the two pc's networked, you can transfer files via
    >>>>explorer. Just click My Computer, and in the address bar type the
    >>>>name of the other computer like this: \\computername\c$ - so if your
    >>>>computer name was bob you would type:
    >>>>
    >>>>\\bob\c$
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Only if you have file sharing enabled and C: shared.
    >>>
    >>>And I think the 2 PCs must also be in the same workgroup.

    >>
    >>Thats true Z. Sorry, should have clarified "networked".

    >
    >
    > The $ is only applicable, if it is a hidden share and
    > you can just go into Explorer and map it as a network
    > drive.


    I use $ to access the local drives on remote pc's throughout domains
    (and/or windows workgroups) all the time. Its called "stringing". You
    can type any computer name and any drive, and access it (with proper
    credentials) through any other machine on a windows network.
    \\computername\c$ or d$ or z$ for which ever drive you need. It also
    works to access hidden shares (if you set up the folder to show hidden
    folders) because you are looking at the share's root drive.
     
    Jowah, Jun 21, 2005
    #11
  12. wparrish

    Pastor Dave Guest

    On Tue, 21 Jun 2005 04:57:12 GMT, Jowah
    <> spake thusly:


    >>>>Only if you have file sharing enabled and C: shared.
    >>>>
    >>>>And I think the 2 PCs must also be in the same workgroup.
    >>>
    >>>Thats true Z. Sorry, should have clarified "networked".

    >>
    >>
    >> The $ is only applicable, if it is a hidden share and
    >> you can just go into Explorer and map it as a network
    >> drive.

    >
    >I use $ to access the local drives on remote pc's throughout domains
    >(and/or windows workgroups) all the time. Its called "stringing".


    Well the root of the local drive is always a hidden
    share and so the $ always applies. :)


    >You
    >can type any computer name and any drive, and access it (with proper
    >credentials) through any other machine on a windows network.
    >\\computername\c$ or d$ or z$ for which ever drive you need. It also
    >works to access hidden shares (if you set up the folder to show hidden
    >folders) because you are looking at the share's root drive.


    I understand networking. I taught the subject. :)
    But thank you for trying to be helpful to me. :)

    Typically, "stringing" is referring to a RAID setup.
    What you're doing isn't really "stringing". It's
    simply sharing a drive from the root and the root is
    always set up (after enabling sharing) by default as
    a hidden share, so to say, "It ALSO works to access
    hidden shares" isn't really accurate, since accessing
    a hidden share is all you're really doing in the first
    place. :)

    Also, just FYI, it isn't wise to share your C: drive
    from the root. You're leaving machines in a very
    vulnerable position. Less so, being a hidden share,
    but still vulnerable.

    Again, just FYI, my comment was not meant to be
    specific to C$. I took that is just a general way of
    saying "sharing". I should have been more clear. :)

    --

    Pastor Dave

    Silence in the Face of Doctrinal Criticism is Suicide

    http://www.ecclesia.org/truth/solution.html

    http://tinyurl.com/ce97m
     
    Pastor Dave, Jun 21, 2005
    #12
  13. wparrish

    Pastor Dave Guest

    On Tue, 21 Jun 2005 05:13:48 GMT, Pastor Dave
    <> spake thusly:


    >Also, just FYI, it isn't wise to share your C: drive
    >from the root. You're leaving machines in a very
    >vulnerable position. Less so, being a hidden share,
    >but still vulnerable.


    P.S.: Unless you need certain data from the root of C:
    on a machine, you can just make a folder and share
    from there. You still have access to the full capacity
    of the drive and can set each proggy on the shared
    machine, to save downloads or whatever, to a subfolder
    under that.

    --

    Pastor Dave

    Silence in the Face of Doctrinal Criticism is Suicide

    http://www.ecclesia.org/truth/solution.html

    http://tinyurl.com/ce97m
     
    Pastor Dave, Jun 21, 2005
    #13
  14. wparrish

    Guest

    To find the name of the pc
    >right click My Computer, select properties, and click the Computer Name
    >tab. It will be listed there.
    >
    >Joe, Charles here, I am running Windows Me, where do I find this computer's name?

    Follow your instructions, no joy, no name. ??
    The reason I read this 'post', I will need to format soon, and would
    like to be able to move/transfer all of Thundbird to floppy/cd, could
    you give me directions,,,,,, talk real slow,,,, dummy @ wheel.
    thanks cl.
     
    , Jun 21, 2005
    #14
  15. wparrish

    Ed Mullen Guest

    wrote:
    > To find the name of the pc
    >
    >>right click My Computer, select properties, and click the Computer Name
    >>tab. It will be listed there.
    >>
    >>Joe, Charles here, I am running Windows Me, where do I find this computer's name?

    >
    > Follow your instructions, no joy, no name. ??
    > The reason I read this 'post', I will need to format soon, and would
    > like to be able to move/transfer all of Thundbird to floppy/cd, could
    > you give me directions,,,,,, talk real slow,,,, dummy @ wheel.
    > thanks cl.
    >


    A couple of good references to get you started:

    http://users.adelphia.net/~irwingreenwald/About Profiles.html
    http://ilias.ca/mozilla/profilefaq/#transferring

    --
    Ed Mullen
    http://edmullen.net
    http://edmullen.net/Mozilla/moz.html
    Always proofread carefully to see if you any words out.
     
    Ed Mullen, Jun 22, 2005
    #15
  16. wparrish

    Jowah Guest

    Pastor Dave wrote:
    > On Tue, 21 Jun 2005 04:57:12 GMT, Jowah
    > <> spake thusly:
    >
    >
    >
    >>>>>Only if you have file sharing enabled and C: shared.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>And I think the 2 PCs must also be in the same workgroup.
    >>>>
    >>>>Thats true Z. Sorry, should have clarified "networked".
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>The $ is only applicable, if it is a hidden share and
    >>>you can just go into Explorer and map it as a network
    >>>drive.

    >>
    >>I use $ to access the local drives on remote pc's throughout domains
    >>(and/or windows workgroups) all the time. Its called "stringing".

    >
    >
    > Well the root of the local drive is always a hidden
    > share and so the $ always applies. :)
    >
    >
    >
    >>You
    >>can type any computer name and any drive, and access it (with proper
    >>credentials) through any other machine on a windows network.
    >>\\computername\c$ or d$ or z$ for which ever drive you need. It also
    >>works to access hidden shares (if you set up the folder to show hidden
    >>folders) because you are looking at the share's root drive.

    >
    >
    > I understand networking. I taught the subject. :)
    > But thank you for trying to be helpful to me. :)
    >
    > Typically, "stringing" is referring to a RAID setup.
    > What you're doing isn't really "stringing". It's
    > simply sharing a drive from the root and the root is
    > always set up (after enabling sharing) by default as
    > a hidden share, so to say, "It ALSO works to access
    > hidden shares" isn't really accurate, since accessing
    > a hidden share is all you're really doing in the first
    > place. :)
    >
    > Also, just FYI, it isn't wise to share your C: drive
    > from the root. You're leaving machines in a very
    > vulnerable position. Less so, being a hidden share,
    > but still vulnerable.
    >
    > Again, just FYI, my comment was not meant to be
    > specific to C$. I took that is just a general way of
    > saying "sharing". I should have been more clear. :)
    >

    Thanks for your helpful words Pastor Dave. I guess I should have said,
    "I call it stringing", instead of "its called stringing", as the term is
    also used to describe a RAID array. A drive doesn't have to be shared
    for its contents to be visible via $ (as long as you are a
    domain/workgroup administrator). None of the 150 harddrives on my
    domain are shared; if they were I wouldn't have to use the $. I
    appreciate the fact that you are willing to share your knowledge with me
    since you taught networking, because I have never had any formal
    training on the subject!:) I hope we can discuss more subjects in the
    future, as I always keep an ear open for free knowledge. I also hope we
    have helped wparrish achieve his goal.
     
    Jowah, Jun 22, 2005
    #16
  17. wparrish

    Jowah Guest

    wrote:
    > To find the name of the pc
    >
    >>right click My Computer, select properties, and click the Computer Name
    >>tab. It will be listed there.
    >>
    >>Joe, Charles here, I am running Windows Me, where do I find this computer's name?

    >
    > Follow your instructions, no joy, no name. ??
    > The reason I read this 'post', I will need to format soon, and would
    > like to be able to move/transfer all of Thundbird to floppy/cd, could
    > you give me directions,,,,,, talk real slow,,,, dummy @ wheel.
    > thanks cl.
    >

    Charles,

    Here is an alternate way to view the same "Computer Name" tab. Go to
    your control panel, double click on the system icon, click on the
    "Computer Name" tab on the top of the System Properties dialog. Is your
    computer on a network?

    Joe
     
    Jowah, Jun 22, 2005
    #17
  18. wparrish

    Pastor Dave Guest

    On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 01:38:51 GMT, Jowah
    <> spake thusly:

    >Pastor Dave wrote:
    >> On Tue, 21 Jun 2005 04:57:12 GMT, Jowah
    >> <> spake thusly:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>>>>Only if you have file sharing enabled and C: shared.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>And I think the 2 PCs must also be in the same workgroup.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Thats true Z. Sorry, should have clarified "networked".
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>The $ is only applicable, if it is a hidden share and
    >>>>you can just go into Explorer and map it as a network
    >>>>drive.
    >>>
    >>>I use $ to access the local drives on remote pc's throughout domains
    >>>(and/or windows workgroups) all the time. Its called "stringing".

    >>
    >>
    >> Well the root of the local drive is always a hidden
    >> share and so the $ always applies. :)
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>You
    >>>can type any computer name and any drive, and access it (with proper
    >>>credentials) through any other machine on a windows network.
    >>>\\computername\c$ or d$ or z$ for which ever drive you need. It also
    >>>works to access hidden shares (if you set up the folder to show hidden
    >>>folders) because you are looking at the share's root drive.

    >>
    >>
    >> I understand networking. I taught the subject. :)
    >> But thank you for trying to be helpful to me. :)
    >>
    >> Typically, "stringing" is referring to a RAID setup.
    >> What you're doing isn't really "stringing". It's
    >> simply sharing a drive from the root and the root is
    >> always set up (after enabling sharing) by default as
    >> a hidden share, so to say, "It ALSO works to access
    >> hidden shares" isn't really accurate, since accessing
    >> a hidden share is all you're really doing in the first
    >> place. :)
    >>
    >> Also, just FYI, it isn't wise to share your C: drive
    >> from the root. You're leaving machines in a very
    >> vulnerable position. Less so, being a hidden share,
    >> but still vulnerable.
    >>
    >> Again, just FYI, my comment was not meant to be
    >> specific to C$. I took that is just a general way of
    >> saying "sharing". I should have been more clear. :)
    >>

    >Thanks for your helpful words Pastor Dave. I guess I should have said,
    >"I call it stringing", instead of "its called stringing", as the term is
    >also used to describe a RAID array. A drive doesn't have to be shared
    >for its contents to be visible via $ (as long as you are a
    >domain/workgroup administrator). None of the 150 harddrives on my
    >domain are shared; if they were I wouldn't have to use the $. I
    >appreciate the fact that you are willing to share your knowledge with me
    >since you taught networking, because I have never had any formal
    >training on the subject!:) I hope we can discuss more subjects in the
    >future, as I always keep an ear open for free knowledge. I also hope we
    >have helped wparrish achieve his goal.


    What do you mean, "they are not shared"? You are
    not turning on sharing for that drive at all? Or do
    you mean that you do not share them with the public?

    As do I. :) Also, just FYI and not to be a pain, even
    if they were shared, you would still have to use the $
    if they are hidden shares, which the root of a drive
    is, by default, when you enable sharing on that drive..

    Also, if you don't need access to all files (including
    the Windows folder, etc.), you can just make a folder
    and enable sharing there and then add that and you
    still have access to the write to all of the free space
    on the drive you just shared.

    --

    Pastor Dave

    Silence in the Face of Doctrinal Criticism is Suicide

    http://www.ecclesia.org/truth/solution.html

    http://tinyurl.com/ce97m
     
    Pastor Dave, Jun 22, 2005
    #18
  19. wparrish

    Guest


    >> To find the name of the pc
    >>
    >>>right click My Computer, select properties, and click the Computer Name
    >>>tab. It will be listed there.
    >>>
    >>>Joe, Charles here, I am running Windows Me, where do I find this computer's name?

    >Here is an alternate way to view the same "Computer Name" tab. Go to
    >your control panel, double click on the system icon, click on the
    >"Computer Name" tab on the top of the System Properties dialog. Is your
    >computer on a network?
    >
    >Joe,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Still no joy. went to,system prop/tabs=Gen/device man/hardware profile/performance??????

    We must be 'on' different pc. ?? cl.
     
    , Jun 23, 2005
    #19
  20. wparrish

    Jowah Guest

    Pastor Dave wrote:
    > On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 01:38:51 GMT, Jowah
    > <> spake thusly:
    >
    >
    >>Pastor Dave wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Tue, 21 Jun 2005 04:57:12 GMT, Jowah
    >>><> spake thusly:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>Only if you have file sharing enabled and C: shared.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>And I think the 2 PCs must also be in the same workgroup.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Thats true Z. Sorry, should have clarified "networked".
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>The $ is only applicable, if it is a hidden share and
    >>>>>you can just go into Explorer and map it as a network
    >>>>>drive.
    >>>>
    >>>>I use $ to access the local drives on remote pc's throughout domains
    >>>>(and/or windows workgroups) all the time. Its called "stringing".
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Well the root of the local drive is always a hidden
    >>>share and so the $ always applies. :)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>You
    >>>>can type any computer name and any drive, and access it (with proper
    >>>>credentials) through any other machine on a windows network.
    >>>>\\computername\c$ or d$ or z$ for which ever drive you need. It also
    >>>>works to access hidden shares (if you set up the folder to show hidden
    >>>>folders) because you are looking at the share's root drive.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>I understand networking. I taught the subject. :)
    >>>But thank you for trying to be helpful to me. :)
    >>>
    >>>Typically, "stringing" is referring to a RAID setup.
    >>>What you're doing isn't really "stringing". It's
    >>>simply sharing a drive from the root and the root is
    >>>always set up (after enabling sharing) by default as
    >>>a hidden share, so to say, "It ALSO works to access
    >>>hidden shares" isn't really accurate, since accessing
    >>>a hidden share is all you're really doing in the first
    >>>place. :)
    >>>
    >>>Also, just FYI, it isn't wise to share your C: drive
    >>>from the root. You're leaving machines in a very
    >>>vulnerable position. Less so, being a hidden share,
    >>>but still vulnerable.
    >>>
    >>>Again, just FYI, my comment was not meant to be
    >>>specific to C$. I took that is just a general way of
    >>>saying "sharing". I should have been more clear. :)
    >>>

    >>
    >>Thanks for your helpful words Pastor Dave. I guess I should have said,
    >>"I call it stringing", instead of "its called stringing", as the term is
    >>also used to describe a RAID array. A drive doesn't have to be shared
    >>for its contents to be visible via $ (as long as you are a
    >>domain/workgroup administrator). None of the 150 harddrives on my
    >>domain are shared; if they were I wouldn't have to use the $. I
    >>appreciate the fact that you are willing to share your knowledge with me
    >>since you taught networking, because I have never had any formal
    >>training on the subject!:) I hope we can discuss more subjects in the
    >>future, as I always keep an ear open for free knowledge. I also hope we
    >>have helped wparrish achieve his goal.

    >
    >
    > What do you mean, "they are not shared"? You are
    > not turning on sharing for that drive at all? Or do
    > you mean that you do not share them with the public?
    >
    > As do I. :) Also, just FYI and not to be a pain, even
    > if they were shared, you would still have to use the $
    > if they are hidden shares, which the root of a drive
    > is, by default, when you enable sharing on that drive..
    >
    > Also, if you don't need access to all files (including
    > the Windows folder, etc.), you can just make a folder
    > and enable sharing there and then add that and you
    > still have access to the write to all of the free space
    > on the drive you just shared.
    >


    Pastor Dave,

    Text correspondence can be so misleading when it comes to deciphering
    the writers mood. Please know that I am not arguing or intending to be
    rude, just being clear in an effort to get my thoughts across and learn
    from you at the same time.

    I mean, sharing isn't turned on for any of the drives at all. My domain
    security policy allows me (the domain admin) to view all the files on my
    network regardless of other security and/or hidden folder settings. I
    think that is why we are getting mixed up.
    I'm sure you know all this already but I will state for clarity: The
    shares on the individual workstations and servers on my network show up
    when you when you access them through explorer like this:
    \\computername The contents of the actual drives (unshared) don't show
    up until I "string" them like this: \\computer\c$
    I understand about making shares, and I do so from time to time if the
    situation calls for it. I usually employ the $ method when I need to
    alter, move, or copy files on a workstation without disturbing the user,
    or logging him/her off to log in as admin. If the user is not using the
    system at the time, I will usually remote into the system with VNC,
    Remote Administrator, or Windows Remote Desktop (or walk over to it!)
    and work with it that way (which comes in handy because about half of my
    network is stubbed out to a location 20 miles away from my office).

    Joe
     
    Jowah, Jun 23, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertising

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