Certification Track

Discussion in 'MCDST' started by MW Henry, Aug 19, 2004.

  1. MW Henry

    MW Henry Guest

    I have no working background in IT. My last courses were a 1 year NST in 1998
    studying Netware 3 (deadend). I'm now changing careers, and seriously looking
    at what I can do to get into IT, even though I'm in my 40's.

    I could probably pass the first of the A+ tests, and my skills are above
    average in general. I do well in self study.

    My questions have to do with the track to take. I'm considering A+ and some
    type of MS Certification (mot sure exactly which , but since it takes awhile
    to study up and pass, I have plenty of time to pick a track.

    Should I just plain self-study with one of the $60 some odd dollar guides
    for each test? SHould I take one of those $800-$1200 3-4 day courses covering
    material for testing? Should I self study and do the course? Or should I self
    study and take a 2 year AS program?

    Any help in thi would be appreciated
    MW Henry, Aug 19, 2004
    #1
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  2. MW Henry

    Jerz Guest

    I would say... (and what do I know?) that you should pick the approach that
    you learn the most from. If you don't have the experience you may need then
    take the classes (if you can afford it) but regardless you really need to
    practice on a real live setup (imho) and learn everything inside and out.
    It is not about just passing the test but actually having a complete
    understanding of whatever track you decide to undertake consists of.

    I recently sold out of a small business that I became board with and always
    had a passion for the IT end of it so I'm switching careers in my late '30's
    but have the small business experience that goes along with my certification
    track hoping I can wedge my way into a consulting position with a software
    company that caters to small business.

    I'm pretty sure only you know the right answer to the question that you
    asked...

    Cheers!

    Jerz


    "MW Henry" <MW > wrote in message
    news:...
    > I have no working background in IT. My last courses were a 1 year NST in

    1998
    > studying Netware 3 (deadend). I'm now changing careers, and seriously

    looking
    > at what I can do to get into IT, even though I'm in my 40's.
    >
    > I could probably pass the first of the A+ tests, and my skills are above
    > average in general. I do well in self study.
    >
    > My questions have to do with the track to take. I'm considering A+ and

    some
    > type of MS Certification (mot sure exactly which , but since it takes

    awhile
    > to study up and pass, I have plenty of time to pick a track.
    >
    > Should I just plain self-study with one of the $60 some odd dollar guides
    > for each test? SHould I take one of those $800-$1200 3-4 day courses

    covering
    > material for testing? Should I self study and do the course? Or should I

    self
    > study and take a 2 year AS program?
    >
    > Any help in thi would be appreciated
    Jerz, Aug 19, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. MW Henry

    Guest Guest

    I too have changed careers in my 40's and through self
    study and hands on I was able to pass A+ and Network+ and
    now my MCP and MCDST. Next up is MCSA then MCSE. One of the
    most important things you can do is get hands on experience
    - either through work, a mentor, or just setting up your
    own Frankenstein lab at home (which is what I did) and
    practice - fail - practice - learn. As far as study
    materials go, there is a plethora of books, courses, etc..
    to choose from. Mike Meyers has excellent certification
    books for A+, Network+ and MCSE tracks. I actually passed
    the Network+ using a Network+ book for Dummies. I would
    also recommend the Trancender practice exams to prepare for
    any exams you take if you do not have sufficient hands on
    experience. They are excellent in preparing you for the
    exams. I am still trying to break into the field (tough
    market right now) but now that I have found a career I
    really enjoy and one that remains challenging, I will keep
    up the good fight and continue to learn and get the
    necessary certifications to get me into the field. Hope
    some of this info helps. Good Luck
    Feral Geek
    >-----Original Message-----
    >I would say... (and what do I know?) that you should pick

    the approach that
    >you learn the most from. If you don't have the experience

    you may need then
    >take the classes (if you can afford it) but regardless you

    really need to
    >practice on a real live setup (imho) and learn everything

    inside and out.
    >It is not about just passing the test but actually having

    a complete
    >understanding of whatever track you decide to undertake

    consists of.
    >
    >I recently sold out of a small business that I became

    board with and always
    >had a passion for the IT end of it so I'm switching

    careers in my late '30's
    >but have the small business experience that goes along

    with my certification
    >track hoping I can wedge my way into a consulting position

    with a software
    >company that caters to small business.
    >
    >I'm pretty sure only you know the right answer to the

    question that you
    >asked...
    >
    >Cheers!
    >
    >Jerz
    >
    >
    >"MW Henry" <MW > wrote in

    message
    >news:...
    >> I have no working background in IT. My last courses were

    a 1 year NST in
    >1998
    >> studying Netware 3 (deadend). I'm now changing careers,

    and seriously
    >looking
    >> at what I can do to get into IT, even though I'm in my

    40's.
    >>
    >> I could probably pass the first of the A+ tests, and my

    skills are above
    >> average in general. I do well in self study.
    >>
    >> My questions have to do with the track to take. I'm

    considering A+ and
    >some
    >> type of MS Certification (mot sure exactly which , but

    since it takes
    >awhile
    >> to study up and pass, I have plenty of time to pick a track.
    >>
    >> Should I just plain self-study with one of the $60 some

    odd dollar guides
    >> for each test? SHould I take one of those $800-$1200 3-4

    day courses
    >covering
    >> material for testing? Should I self study and do the

    course? Or should I
    >self
    >> study and take a 2 year AS program?
    >>
    >> Any help in thi would be appreciated

    >
    >
    >.
    >
    Guest, Aug 19, 2004
    #3
  4. MW Henry

    Alex Guest

    the minimum Score my friend is 700!! :)


    "MW Henry" wrote:

    > Thanks, that helps alot. I'm used to the frankenlab type thing, but I'd be
    > interested to know what you had set up. Also, I see people posting scores
    > like 800. Whats the range and pass?
    >
    Alex, Aug 20, 2004
    #4
  5. MW Henry

    Feral Geek Guest

    700 is the minimum score to pass. As far as the
    Frankenstein Lab goes, I have a Network setup with Windows
    2003 Server and two PC's, one with 2000 Pro and the other
    with XP Pro. This enables me to do all the networking
    exercises, configuations, TCP/IP troubleshooting exercises,
    Permissions, etc.. through self-study. The Microsoft Press
    books are excellent for learning and doing hands-on
    exercises. However, they are not the best at preparing you
    for exams. I have done very well using Transcender
    practice exams (transcender.com) to prepare for the exams
    as well as learning from the practice test questions. Hope
    this helps. SOunds like we are in the same place career
    wise. Hang in there, keep learning and getting some
    certifications and eventually you will be able to break
    into the field. Good luck.
    >-----Original Message-----
    >Thanks, that helps alot. I'm used to the frankenlab type

    thing, but I'd be
    >interested to know what you had set up. Also, I see people

    posting scores
    >like 800. Whats the range and pass?
    >
    >"" wrote:
    >
    >> I too have changed careers in my 40's and through self
    >> study and hands on I was able to pass A+ and Network+ and
    >> now my MCP and MCDST. Next up is MCSA then MCSE. One of the
    >> most important things you can do is get hands on experience
    >> - either through work, a mentor, or just setting up your
    >> own Frankenstein lab at home (which is what I did) and
    >> practice - fail - practice - learn. As far as study
    >> materials go, there is a plethora of books, courses, etc..
    >> to choose from. Mike Meyers has excellent certification
    >> books for A+, Network+ and MCSE tracks. I actually passed
    >> the Network+ using a Network+ book for Dummies. I would
    >> also recommend the Trancender practice exams to prepare for
    >> any exams you take if you do not have sufficient hands on
    >> experience. They are excellent in preparing you for the
    >> exams. I am still trying to break into the field (tough
    >> market right now) but now that I have found a career I
    >> really enjoy and one that remains challenging, I will keep
    >> up the good fight and continue to learn and get the
    >> necessary certifications to get me into the field. Hope
    >> some of this info helps. Good Luck
    >> Feral Geek
    >> >-----Original Message-----
    >> >I would say... (and what do I know?) that you should pick

    >> the approach that
    >> >you learn the most from. If you don't have the experience

    >> you may need then
    >> >take the classes (if you can afford it) but regardless you

    >> really need to
    >> >practice on a real live setup (imho) and learn everything

    >> inside and out.
    >> >It is not about just passing the test but actually having

    >> a complete
    >> >understanding of whatever track you decide to undertake

    >> consists of.
    >> >
    >> >I recently sold out of a small business that I became

    >> board with and always
    >> >had a passion for the IT end of it so I'm switching

    >> careers in my late '30's
    >> >but have the small business experience that goes along

    >> with my certification
    >> >track hoping I can wedge my way into a consulting position

    >> with a software
    >> >company that caters to small business.
    >> >
    >> >I'm pretty sure only you know the right answer to the

    >> question that you
    >> >asked...
    >> >
    >> >Cheers!
    >> >
    >> >Jerz
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >"MW Henry" <MW > wrote in

    >> message
    >> >news:...
    >> >> I have no working background in IT. My last courses were

    >> a 1 year NST in
    >> >1998
    >> >> studying Netware 3 (deadend). I'm now changing careers,

    >> and seriously
    >> >looking
    >> >> at what I can do to get into IT, even though I'm in my

    >> 40's.
    >> >>
    >> >> I could probably pass the first of the A+ tests, and my

    >> skills are above
    >> >> average in general. I do well in self study.
    >> >>
    >> >> My questions have to do with the track to take. I'm

    >> considering A+ and
    >> >some
    >> >> type of MS Certification (mot sure exactly which , but

    >> since it takes
    >> >awhile
    >> >> to study up and pass, I have plenty of time to pick a

    track.
    >> >>
    >> >> Should I just plain self-study with one of the $60 some

    >> odd dollar guides
    >> >> for each test? SHould I take one of those $800-$1200 3-4

    >> day courses
    >> >covering
    >> >> material for testing? Should I self study and do the

    >> course? Or should I
    >> >self
    >> >> study and take a 2 year AS program?
    >> >>
    >> >> Any help in thi would be appreciated
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >.
    >> >

    >>

    >.
    >
    Feral Geek, Aug 20, 2004
    #5
  6. MW Henry

    Robert Guest

    I have been using Virtual PC to set up my lab for study
    purpose. It allows me to use my computer for normal
    things and is much cheaper than buying all the hardware.
    It doesn't give me much interaction when it comes to
    routers and switches, but I have a lab sim for that as
    well.
    >-----Original Message-----
    >700 is the minimum score to pass. As far as the
    >Frankenstein Lab goes, I have a Network setup with Windows
    >2003 Server and two PC's, one with 2000 Pro and the other
    >with XP Pro. This enables me to do all the networking
    >exercises, configuations, TCP/IP troubleshooting

    exercises,
    >Permissions, etc.. through self-study. The Microsoft

    Press
    >books are excellent for learning and doing hands-on
    >exercises. However, they are not the best at preparing

    you
    >for exams. I have done very well using Transcender
    >practice exams (transcender.com) to prepare for the exams
    >as well as learning from the practice test questions.

    Hope
    >this helps. SOunds like we are in the same place career
    >wise. Hang in there, keep learning and getting some
    >certifications and eventually you will be able to break
    >into the field. Good luck.
    >>-----Original Message-----
    >>Thanks, that helps alot. I'm used to the frankenlab type

    >thing, but I'd be
    >>interested to know what you had set up. Also, I see

    people
    >posting scores
    >>like 800. Whats the range and pass?
    >>
    >>"" wrote:
    >>
    >>> I too have changed careers in my 40's and through self
    >>> study and hands on I was able to pass A+ and Network+

    and
    >>> now my MCP and MCDST. Next up is MCSA then MCSE. One

    of the
    >>> most important things you can do is get hands on

    experience
    >>> - either through work, a mentor, or just setting up

    your
    >>> own Frankenstein lab at home (which is what I did) and
    >>> practice - fail - practice - learn. As far as study
    >>> materials go, there is a plethora of books, courses,

    etc..
    >>> to choose from. Mike Meyers has excellent

    certification
    >>> books for A+, Network+ and MCSE tracks. I actually

    passed
    >>> the Network+ using a Network+ book for Dummies. I would
    >>> also recommend the Trancender practice exams to

    prepare for
    >>> any exams you take if you do not have sufficient hands

    on
    >>> experience. They are excellent in preparing you for

    the
    >>> exams. I am still trying to break into the field

    (tough
    >>> market right now) but now that I have found a career I
    >>> really enjoy and one that remains challenging, I will

    keep
    >>> up the good fight and continue to learn and get the
    >>> necessary certifications to get me into the field.

    Hope
    >>> some of this info helps. Good Luck
    >>> Feral Geek
    >>> >-----Original Message-----
    >>> >I would say... (and what do I know?) that you should

    pick
    >>> the approach that
    >>> >you learn the most from. If you don't have the

    experience
    >>> you may need then
    >>> >take the classes (if you can afford it) but

    regardless you
    >>> really need to
    >>> >practice on a real live setup (imho) and learn

    everything
    >>> inside and out.
    >>> >It is not about just passing the test but actually

    having
    >>> a complete
    >>> >understanding of whatever track you decide to

    undertake
    >>> consists of.
    >>> >
    >>> >I recently sold out of a small business that I became
    >>> board with and always
    >>> >had a passion for the IT end of it so I'm switching
    >>> careers in my late '30's
    >>> >but have the small business experience that goes along
    >>> with my certification
    >>> >track hoping I can wedge my way into a consulting

    position
    >>> with a software
    >>> >company that caters to small business.
    >>> >
    >>> >I'm pretty sure only you know the right answer to the
    >>> question that you
    >>> >asked...
    >>> >
    >>> >Cheers!
    >>> >
    >>> >Jerz
    >>> >
    >>> >
    >>> >"MW Henry" <MW > wrote

    in
    >>> message
    >>> >news:01859CC5-0105-4CA2-A973-

    ...
    >>> >> I have no working background in IT. My last courses

    were
    >>> a 1 year NST in
    >>> >1998
    >>> >> studying Netware 3 (deadend). I'm now changing

    careers,
    >>> and seriously
    >>> >looking
    >>> >> at what I can do to get into IT, even though I'm

    in my
    >>> 40's.
    >>> >>
    >>> >> I could probably pass the first of the A+ tests,

    and my
    >>> skills are above
    >>> >> average in general. I do well in self study.
    >>> >>
    >>> >> My questions have to do with the track to take. I'm
    >>> considering A+ and
    >>> >some
    >>> >> type of MS Certification (mot sure exactly which ,

    but
    >>> since it takes
    >>> >awhile
    >>> >> to study up and pass, I have plenty of time to pick

    a
    >track.
    >>> >>
    >>> >> Should I just plain self-study with one of the $60

    some
    >>> odd dollar guides
    >>> >> for each test? SHould I take one of those $800-

    $1200 3-4
    >>> day courses
    >>> >covering
    >>> >> material for testing? Should I self study and do the
    >>> course? Or should I
    >>> >self
    >>> >> study and take a 2 year AS program?
    >>> >>
    >>> >> Any help in thi would be appreciated
    >>> >
    >>> >
    >>> >.
    >>> >
    >>>

    >>.
    >>

    >.
    >
    Robert, Aug 20, 2004
    #6
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