Certification Question

Discussion in 'MCSA' started by jason7655, May 25, 2007.

  1. jason7655

    jason7655 Guest

    I'm trying to get input from cisco fans and microsoft fans as I'm
    evaluating the following:

    I've been removed from IT for a few years after period of doing web
    development. I'm looking to get a few certifications to signify that
    being away from things didn't hamper my ability in the network admin
    area and also relearn all the ins and outs. It could also help with a
    better job down the road.

    The question revolves around Network+, CCNA, and MCSA 2003 (70-290,
    70-291, and 70-270).

    Let me cover each one individually.

    1) Network+. I thought that getting this one would give me a good
    foundation, and I had actually considered it before I was told about
    the CCNA and how much weight it would carry (of course this was from a
    CISCO employee). I have the study guides for this test but I'm
    wondering if I should hold off on this one.

    2) CCNA. As I stated before, I was told that this would be a really
    good one to get. I was basically told that when cisco is hiring
    someone they won't hardly look at you unless you have a MCSA and CCNA
    (take it for what it's worth).

    3) MCSA 2003. In my current environment, this would probably do the
    most good. I'm in state government and they are usually behind the
    curve on moving to the latest and greatest, so going for the new certs
    probably won't do me any good at this point.

    Given the info I've presented above, what should be the path I take?

    Which one should I do first? Should I eliminate the Network+ cert and
    only use the books for ref?

    Thanks
     
    jason7655, May 25, 2007
    #1
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  2. "jason7655" <> wrote in message
    news::

    > I'm trying to get input from cisco fans and microsoft fans as I'm
    > evaluating the following:
    >
    > I've been removed from IT for a few years after period of doing web
    > development. I'm looking to get a few certifications to signify that
    > being away from things didn't hamper my ability in the network admin
    > area and also relearn all the ins and outs. It could also help with a
    > better job down the road.


    Experience before certifications. Achieving certifications to "signify"
    that you have not hampered your ability in the network admin area is a
    poor excuse to go after these certifications. Do you have experience
    with configuring Cisco switches and routers? Do you have experience
    administrating a Microsoft Server 2003? If not then learn the
    technology, get the recommended experience with the technology, then
    pursue your certification dreams.

    > The question revolves around Network+, CCNA, and MCSA 2003 (70-290,
    > 70-291, and 70-270).
    >
    > Let me cover each one individually.
    >
    > 1) Network+. I thought that getting this one would give me a good
    > foundation,


    It will.

    > 2) CCNA. As I stated before, I was told that this would be a really
    > good one to get. I was basically told that when cisco is hiring
    > someone they won't hardly look at you unless you have a MCSA and CCNA
    > (take it for what it's worth).


    Do you plan to be administrating and troubleshooting Cisco products in
    the near future? Or at all? If not, then skip this one.

    >
    > 3) MCSA 2003. In my current environment, this would probably do the
    > most good. I'm in state government and they are usually behind the
    > curve on moving to the latest and greatest, so going for the new certs
    > probably won't do me any good at this point.


    So if the certification will not help you in your current situation, and
    you have no experience administrating and troubleshooting a Windows
    Server 2003 domain, why consider the MCSA 2003?

    What is your current position with your employer? What is it you do at
    work? Answer this and give us some background on your past 3 years
    experience in the I.T. field and we can better assist you.

    --
    Michael D. Alligood, MCSA, MCDST
    The I.T. Classroom - http://www.theitclassroom.com/
    CertGuard - http://www.certguard.com
     
    Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard], May 26, 2007
    #2
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  3. jason7655

    jason7655 Guest

    On May 25, 9:59 pm, "Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard]"
    <> wrote:
    > "jason7655" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news::
    >
    > > I'm trying to get input from cisco fans and microsoft fans as I'm
    > > evaluating the following:

    >
    > > I've been removed from IT for a few years after period of doing web
    > > development. I'm looking to get a few certifications to signify that
    > > being away from things didn't hamper my ability in the network admin
    > > area and also relearn all the ins and outs. It could also help with a
    > > better job down the road.

    >
    > Experience before certifications. Achieving certifications to "signify"
    > that you have not hampered your ability in the network admin area is a
    > poor excuse to go after these certifications. Do you have experience
    > with configuring Cisco switches and routers?

    No, but possible promotions look at a CCNA cert as a good thing.

    Do you have experience
    > administrating a Microsoft Server 2003? If not then learn the
    > technology, get the recommended experience with the technology, then
    > pursue your certification dreams.

    Yes.

    >
    > > The question revolves around Network+,CCNA, and MCSA 2003 (70-290,
    > > 70-291, and 70-270).

    >
    > > Let me cover each one individually.

    >
    > > 1) Network+. I thought that getting this one would give me a good
    > > foundation,

    >
    > It will.
    >
    > > 2)CCNA. As I stated before, I was told that this would be a really
    > > good one to get. I was basically told that when cisco is hiring
    > > someone they won't hardly look at you unless you have a MCSA andCCNA
    > > (take it for what it's worth).

    >
    > Do you plan to be administrating and troubleshooting Cisco products in
    > the near future? Or at all? If not, then skip this one.


    As stated above, this one is probably the quickest cert for job
    promotion.

    >
    >
    >
    > > 3) MCSA 2003. In my current environment, this would probably do the
    > > most good. I'm in state government and they are usually behind the
    > > curve on moving to the latest and greatest, so going for the new certs
    > > probably won't do me any good at this point.

    >
    > So if the certification will not help you in your current situation, and
    > you have no experience administrating and troubleshooting a Windows
    > Server 2003 domain, why consider the MCSA 2003?
    >

    I don't believe I said it wouldn't help me in my current situation.
    This is probably the main one that would help me in my current
    situation.

    > What is your current position with your employer? What is it you do at
    > work? Answer this and give us some background on your past 3 years
    > experience in the I.T. field and we can better assist you.
    >

    I started out in the IT field in the late 90's pulling cable and then
    moved to routers and other hardware. I became a sys admin and dealt
    with windows and linux. After a while I became involved in web
    development and have spent the last 3+ years there and now I'm back in
    IT (networking, SQL, etc.)

    For me, a cert isn't just about the paper (no matter what you say,
    where I'm at the CCNA or MCSA will get you in the door better than not
    having it)...but it's also about relearning things I haven't done in a
    couple years.
     
    jason7655, May 29, 2007
    #3
  4. "jason7655" <> wrote in message
    news::

    > For me, a cert isn't just about the paper (no matter what you say,
    > where I'm at the CCNA or MCSA will get you in the door better than not
    > having it)...



    Not without the experience it will not. If that employers rewards
    employees for certifications without experience, or the employer hires
    individuals just because of their certification resume without looking
    at past experience then I would seriously question the employer.
    Further, as a consumer I would not do business with an outside
    consulting firm without first checking experience and credentials on
    those that would be working on my project.

    --
    Michael D. Alligood, MCSA, MCDST
    The I.T. Classroom - http://www.theitclassroom.com/
    CertGuard - http://www.certguard.com
     
    Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard], May 30, 2007
    #4
  5. > For me, a cert isn't just about the paper (no matter what you say,
    > where I'm at the CCNA or MCSA will get you in the door better than not
    > having it)...


    The days of the "paper tiger" are long gone. Today, IT managers know that
    certifications not only require content knowledge, but also practical
    experience with the products that their staff support. Five years ago,
    everyone who help MCSE was a demi-god, but now you can typically find at
    least five in all but the smallest of communities.

    Personal story time....When I left the military, I felt that I had a pretty
    strong IT background and that my resume would get me through any job
    interview. The more interviews I went to, I found that without
    certifications to validate the experience, I was being dismissed offhand. I
    had the knowledge, but not the validation. Hence, my quest for
    certification.

    If you can draw on past experience when studying for an exam, then you know
    the exam is right for you. If not, ask questions of those who work with the
    equipment or software and ask to help them out with a project. In most
    cases, they will typically welcome the help even if they have to walk you
    through a process step by step. Gain the experience, get to know the
    software or hardware, and then study for the exam.

    It's not just about "getting in the door." It's knowing what to do after
    you're there.

    --
    Chance Webster
    A+, Network+, MCDST, MCITP, MCTS


    "jason7655" wrote:

    > On May 25, 9:59 pm, "Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard]"
    > <> wrote:
    > > "jason7655" <> wrote in message
    > >
    > > news::
    > >
    > > > I'm trying to get input from cisco fans and microsoft fans as I'm
    > > > evaluating the following:

    > >
    > > > I've been removed from IT for a few years after period of doing web
    > > > development. I'm looking to get a few certifications to signify that
    > > > being away from things didn't hamper my ability in the network admin
    > > > area and also relearn all the ins and outs. It could also help with a
    > > > better job down the road.

    > >
    > > Experience before certifications. Achieving certifications to "signify"
    > > that you have not hampered your ability in the network admin area is a
    > > poor excuse to go after these certifications. Do you have experience
    > > with configuring Cisco switches and routers?

    > No, but possible promotions look at a CCNA cert as a good thing.
    >
    > Do you have experience
    > > administrating a Microsoft Server 2003? If not then learn the
    > > technology, get the recommended experience with the technology, then
    > > pursue your certification dreams.

    > Yes.
    >
    > >
    > > > The question revolves around Network+,CCNA, and MCSA 2003 (70-290,
    > > > 70-291, and 70-270).

    > >
    > > > Let me cover each one individually.

    > >
    > > > 1) Network+. I thought that getting this one would give me a good
    > > > foundation,

    > >
    > > It will.
    > >
    > > > 2)CCNA. As I stated before, I was told that this would be a really
    > > > good one to get. I was basically told that when cisco is hiring
    > > > someone they won't hardly look at you unless you have a MCSA andCCNA
    > > > (take it for what it's worth).

    > >
    > > Do you plan to be administrating and troubleshooting Cisco products in
    > > the near future? Or at all? If not, then skip this one.

    >
    > As stated above, this one is probably the quickest cert for job
    > promotion.
    >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > > 3) MCSA 2003. In my current environment, this would probably do the
    > > > most good. I'm in state government and they are usually behind the
    > > > curve on moving to the latest and greatest, so going for the new certs
    > > > probably won't do me any good at this point.

    > >
    > > So if the certification will not help you in your current situation, and
    > > you have no experience administrating and troubleshooting a Windows
    > > Server 2003 domain, why consider the MCSA 2003?
    > >

    > I don't believe I said it wouldn't help me in my current situation.
    > This is probably the main one that would help me in my current
    > situation.
    >
    > > What is your current position with your employer? What is it you do at
    > > work? Answer this and give us some background on your past 3 years
    > > experience in the I.T. field and we can better assist you.
    > >

    > I started out in the IT field in the late 90's pulling cable and then
    > moved to routers and other hardware. I became a sys admin and dealt
    > with windows and linux. After a while I became involved in web
    > development and have spent the last 3+ years there and now I'm back in
    > IT (networking, SQL, etc.)
    >
    > For me, a cert isn't just about the paper (no matter what you say,
    > where I'm at the CCNA or MCSA will get you in the door better than not
    > having it)...but it's also about relearning things I haven't done in a
    > couple years.
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Chance Webster, May 30, 2007
    #5
  6. jason7655

    Jeff Guest

    "Chance Webster" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The more interviews I went to, I found that without
    > certifications to validate the experience, I was being dismissed offhand.
    > I
    > had the knowledge, but not the validation. Hence, my quest for
    > certification.


    Agreed. I have 20 years of IT experience. I have worked in many enviroments
    from small companies to VERY large enterprise networks (140,000 users).
    I had to reduce my resume from 7 pages to a compact 3 page resume just so
    someone would read it. At 7 pages, I didn't even want to read it.. LOL
    Still.. one problem remained. Due to my busy career, I had let my
    certifications lapse. I was certified back in the ole NT 4.0 days and you
    are correct. These days without the certifications to back up your
    experience, your resume will be filtered out pretty quick. Hence, my quest
    for certification.
     
    Jeff, May 30, 2007
    #6
  7. jason7655

    jason7655 Guest

    On May 30, 2:27 pm, "Jeff" <> wrote:
    > "Chance Webster" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    > > The more interviews I went to, I found that without
    > > certifications to validate the experience, I was being dismissed offhand.
    > > I
    > > had the knowledge, but not the validation. Hence, my quest for
    > > certification.

    >
    > Agreed. I have 20 years of IT experience. I have worked in many enviroments
    > from small companies to VERY large enterprise networks (140,000 users).
    > I had to reduce my resume from 7 pages to a compact 3 page resume just so
    > someone would read it. At 7 pages, I didn't even want to read it.. LOL
    > Still.. one problem remained. Due to my busy career, I had let my
    > certifications lapse. I was certified back in the ole NT 4.0 days and you
    > are correct. These days without the certifications to back up your
    > experience, your resume will be filtered out pretty quick. Hence, my quest
    > for certification.


    Thanks for validating what I'm saying guys. I've watched these
    newsgroups for a little while and it seems that sometimes the true
    value of a cert is downplayed. Maybe that's because generally the
    lower amount of people that hold a valued cert give that cert more
    value. Over saturated markets can make certs appear less valid.

    It's kind of like a catch 22...got to have the experience to get the
    experience.

    Let's say I have over 5 years IT experience (which I do), and I don't
    have any certs. If I'm up against candidates with the 1-4 years
    experience, but they have CCNA's, MCSA's and MCSE's...who do you think
    will get that first interview. If they are interviewing a minimal
    amount of candidates then I might have missed my chance.

    I would argue that a certification doesn't just get your foot in the
    door, it can give you valuable experience in studying technology and
    further your learning capacity. I've looked at too many job listings
    with CCNA preferred, or MCSA desired to believe some of the talk I
    hear about certs not mattering.
     
    jason7655, Jun 4, 2007
    #7
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