Cerification and No Degree.

Discussion in 'MCSD' started by Ben, Apr 22, 2004.

  1. Ben

    Ben Guest

    I heard that certifications with experience and no degree,
    is more valuable than anyone with a degree. Now is that
    true?
    Ben, Apr 22, 2004
    #1
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  2. >I heard that certifications with experience and no degree,
    >is more valuable than anyone with a degree. Now is that
    >true?


    Experience, Experience, Experience. That is, both technical and
    business Experience.

    Having said that, everyone has to start somewhere, and this is where
    education comes in to play. This is what makes you stand out from the
    rest (or at least stand out with the best of the rest!), and is what
    employers look for.

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Apr 22, 2004
    #2
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  3. Ben

    Guest Guest

    no that's not true at all, certification is just one skill
    within one technology, a degree such as an engineering
    degree means that you can learn and solve problem no
    matter what the technology is.


    >-----Original Message-----
    >I heard that certifications with experience and no

    degree,
    >is more valuable than anyone with a degree. Now is that
    >true?
    >.
    >
    Guest, Apr 22, 2004
    #3
  4. >no that's not true at all, certification is just one skill
    >within one technology, a degree such as an engineering
    >degree means that you can learn and solve problem no
    >matter what the technology is.


    Absolutely

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Apr 22, 2004
    #4
  5. Ben

    Bert Sachs Guest

    "The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere" <.> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:...
    > >no that's not true at all, certification is just one skill
    > >within one technology, a degree such as an engineering
    > >degree means that you can learn and solve problem no
    > >matter what the technology is.

    >
    > Absolutely
    >


    This depends. When you have strong skills in developing with a language (C#
    or VB.NET) and the MS technology, you are also able to adapt this knowledge
    to any other language/technology. I think experience is the key.
    Bert Sachs, Apr 23, 2004
    #5
  6. >> >no that's not true at all, certification is just one skill
    >> >within one technology, a degree such as an engineering
    >> >degree means that you can learn and solve problem no
    >> >matter what the technology is.

    >>
    >> Absolutely
    >>

    >
    >This depends. When you have strong skills in developing with a language (C#
    >or VB.NET) and the MS technology, you are also able to adapt this knowledge
    >to any other language/technology. I think experience is the key.


    Again, 'Absolutely'

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Apr 23, 2004
    #6
  7. Fundamental thinking skills is still king. Knowing how to learn and how to
    look for and find solutions is something the high school grad with lots of
    experience in one language is quite possibly missing. Most (I would hope!)
    people learn the psycho-epistemology of problem solving in college. Cause
    you sure don't get it in government run high schools.

    I don't even think a CS or engineering degree is very important. More
    impressive is an applicant with a math degree and a minor in history -- ie,
    someone who can think and write -- who independently learned Java and read
    Booch and McConnell.

    Brad Williams


    "Bert Sachs" <> wrote in message
    news:#...
    >
    > "The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere" <.> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    > news:...
    > > >no that's not true at all, certification is just one skill
    > > >within one technology, a degree such as an engineering
    > > >degree means that you can learn and solve problem no
    > > >matter what the technology is.

    > >
    > > Absolutely
    > >

    >
    > This depends. When you have strong skills in developing with a language

    (C#
    > or VB.NET) and the MS technology, you are also able to adapt this

    knowledge
    > to any other language/technology. I think experience is the key.
    >
    >
    Brad Williams, Apr 23, 2004
    #7
  8. >ie,
    >someone who can think and write -- who independently learned Java and read
    >Booch and McConnell.


    .... and bake cookies!

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Apr 23, 2004
    #8
  9. Ben

    Ben Guest


    >Having said that, everyone has to start somewhere, and

    this is where
    >education comes in to play. This is what makes you stand

    out from the
    >rest (or at least stand out with the best of the rest!),

    and is what
    >employers look for.
    >


    Thanks Kline! You just saved me from dropping out of
    college for Cert's.
    Ben, Apr 23, 2004
    #9
  10. >Thanks Kline! You just saved me from dropping out of
    >college for Cert's.


    You more than likely would have regretted that for the rest of your
    life, that is unless you won one of the state lotteries! Think of it
    this way, you don't want to end up living in a dumpster like me do
    you!!!

    Good luck.

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Apr 23, 2004
    #10
  11. Ben

    Eric Guest

    Ben wrote:

    > Thanks Kline! You just saved me from dropping out of
    > college for Cert's.


    You should try to get the highest gradepoint average you can get.
    Getting the degree is the most important part, but your gradepoint will
    be a factor in determining what job you'll get.

    In my opinion, your gradepoint is important for about your first 5 or
    10 years in the business. After that, your experience is more important
    than your gradepoint.

    When I went to college my father told me that the gradepoint wasn't too
    important as long as you get the degree. I spent 10 years regretting
    that I listened to his advice on this :-(

    Eric
    Eric, Apr 23, 2004
    #11
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