Cd-rw

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Andy Petro, Nov 29, 2007.

  1. Andy Petro

    Andy Petro Guest

    What is the difference between CD-RW and CD+ RW.in rewritable disks .



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    Andy Petro, Nov 29, 2007
    #1
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  2. Andy Petro

    Evan Platt Guest

    Evan Platt, Nov 29, 2007
    #2
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  3. Andy Petro

    Not Given Guest

    "Andy Petro" <> wrote in
    news:474f28fd$0$26009$:

    > What is the difference between CD-RW and CD+ RW.in rewritable disks .
    >
    >
    >


    Never heard of CD+RW. It think you mean DVD+RW.
     
    Not Given, Nov 29, 2007
    #3
  4. Andy Petro

    thanatoid Guest

    "Andy Petro" <> wrote in
    news:474f28fd$0$26009$:

    > What is the difference between CD-RW and CD+ RW.in
    > rewritable disks .


    There are NO CD+RW discs. (BTW, floppy and hard disKs, compact
    etc disCs.)

    The dash was used as in "normal" English, but when DVD-R's and
    DVD-RW's came out with their 5 (or more) +/- and data formats,
    people started getting confused.

    There are only CD-R's and CD-RW's, and the second one is
    rewriteable between 50-200 (my experience, quality brands) and
    1000 times (manufacturers' claims) and costs a few dollars,
    while the first costs less than a quarter and is "use once"
    only.

    For a variety of reasons, rewriteable DVD's are largely
    replacing CD-RW's for most consumers. CD-R's are still the best
    for permanent backup/storage of 600-700MB of data per disc.
     
    thanatoid, Nov 30, 2007
    #4
  5. Andy Petro

    Aardvark Guest

    On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 00:10:35 +0000, thanatoid wrote:

    > There are NO CD+RW discs. (BTW, floppy and hard disKs, compact etc
    > disCs.)


    I know you're pretty good with grammar, syntax, spelling and all the
    rest, mate, but in ENGLISH English disk (disc) is correctly spelt D-I-S-C.

    I would assume that any product of this sort spelt with a 'K' would be US
    (or US influenced) manufactured whereas those spelt with a 'C' are more
    likely to have been manufactured in some country which had an historical
    British influence.

    I doubt that the spelling of whichever commodity is in question makes any
    difference to its' purpose or use.
     
    Aardvark, Nov 30, 2007
    #5
  6. Andy Petro

    Oldus Fartus Guest

    "Aardvark" <> wrote in message
    news:h6J3j.45617$...
    > On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 00:10:35 +0000, thanatoid wrote:
    >
    >> There are NO CD+RW discs. (BTW, floppy and hard disKs, compact etc
    >> disCs.)

    >
    > I know you're pretty good with grammar, syntax, spelling and all the
    > rest, mate, but in ENGLISH English disk (disc) is correctly spelt D-I-S-C.
    >
    > I would assume that any product of this sort spelt with a 'K' would be US
    > (or US influenced) manufactured whereas those spelt with a 'C' are more
    > likely to have been manufactured in some country which had an historical
    > British influence.
    >
    > I doubt that the spelling of whichever commodity is in question makes any
    > difference to its' purpose or use.



    Actually, you are both correct, to a point. In general terms the spelling
    disc/disk is a regional thing, but not when referring to computer storage.

    The correct spelling when referring to non-optical storage is DISK (think
    DISKette), and with optical is DISC.

    --
    Cheers
    Oldus Fartus
     
    Oldus Fartus, Nov 30, 2007
    #6
  7. Andy Petro

    thanatoid Guest

    Aardvark <> wrote in
    news:h6J3j.45617$:

    > On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 00:10:35 +0000, thanatoid wrote:
    >
    >> There are NO CD+RW discs. (BTW, floppy and hard disKs,
    >> compact etc disCs.)

    >
    > I know you're pretty good with grammar, syntax, spelling
    > and all the rest, mate, but in ENGLISH English disk (disc)
    > is correctly spelt D-I-S-C.
    >
    > I would assume that any product of this sort spelt with a
    > 'K' would be US (or US influenced) manufactured whereas
    > those spelt with a 'C' are more likely to have been
    > manufactured in some country which had an historical
    > British influence.
    >
    > I doubt that the spelling of whichever commodity is in
    > question makes any difference to its' purpose or use.
    >


    I know what you are saying, but this is a special case, as are
    many things to do with computers.

    Google, maybe Wiki, and you will find out. It's a convention
    agreed upon to prevent confusion.

    As to whether spelling *matters*, and if so, under what
    circumcisions, well, that's something we don't REALLY want to
    get into, do we now...?

    P.S.
    "Spelt" ! Nice touch!

    P.P.S.
    C. and C. That was intentional. Joke! Haaar!
     
    thanatoid, Nov 30, 2007
    #7
  8. Andy Petro

    PeeCee Guest

    "Oldus Fartus" <> wrote in message
    news:474f7613$0$30585$...
    > "Aardvark" <> wrote in message
    > news:h6J3j.45617$...
    >> On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 00:10:35 +0000, thanatoid wrote:
    >>
    >>> There are NO CD+RW discs. (BTW, floppy and hard disKs, compact etc
    >>> disCs.)

    >>
    >> I know you're pretty good with grammar, syntax, spelling and all the
    >> rest, mate, but in ENGLISH English disk (disc) is correctly spelt
    >> D-I-S-C.
    >>
    >> I would assume that any product of this sort spelt with a 'K' would be US
    >> (or US influenced) manufactured whereas those spelt with a 'C' are more
    >> likely to have been manufactured in some country which had an historical
    >> British influence.
    >>
    >> I doubt that the spelling of whichever commodity is in question makes any
    >> difference to its' purpose or use.

    >
    >
    > Actually, you are both correct, to a point. In general terms the
    > spelling disc/disk is a regional thing, but not when referring to computer
    > storage.
    >
    > The correct spelling when referring to non-optical storage is DISK (think
    > DISKette), and with optical is DISC.
    >
    > --
    > Cheers
    > Oldus Fartus



    DisK
    http://www.google.co.nz/search?hl=en&q=define: disk&meta=

    DisC
    http://www.google.co.nz/search?hl=en&q=define:disc&meta=

    Paul.
     
    PeeCee, Nov 30, 2007
    #8
  9. Andy Petro

    Oldus Fartus Guest

    "PeeCee" <> wrote in message
    news:fioajm$9ot$...


    >
    >
    > DisK
    > http://www.google.co.nz/search?hl=en&q=define: disk&meta=
    >
    > DisC
    > http://www.google.co.nz/search?hl=en&q=define:disc&meta=
    >


    Quite contradictory definitions in that lot Paul, with a lot of
    inconsistency.

    Wikipedia has a pretty good summary, part of which (from
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disk )
    The spelling disc is commonly used for audio and video recording media,
    including:

    a.. Transcription disc (gramophone record or "phonograph record" in U.S.
    English)
    b.. Aluminum disc
    c.. Optical disc, the most common of which are:
    a.. Compact Disc
    b.. Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc (DVD)
    d.. Disc film
    The spelling disk (sometimes viewed as an abbreviation of diskette) is used
    for magnetic recording media (see disk storage), including:

    a.. Hard disk, also known as a hard drive
    b.. Floppy disk, or diskette
    c.. RAM disk
    d.. Also (perhaps erroneously) to refer to tape drives and flash memory
    cards for both music and computer data

    --
    Cheers
    Oldus Fartus
     
    Oldus Fartus, Nov 30, 2007
    #9
  10. Andy Petro

    Aardvark Guest

    On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 03:13:24 +0000, thanatoid wrote:

    > As to whether spelling *matters*, and if so, under what circumcisions,
    > well, that's something we don't REALLY want to get into, do we now...?
    >


    LOL Surely you meant 'circumstances' :)

    > P.S.
    > "Spelt" ! Nice touch!


    In the UK the word 'spelled' is rarely, if ever, used as past participle
    of the verb 'spell'. In fact as I type this, a red wavy line has appeared
    under the word 'spelled', indicating that my UK English spellchecker
    thinks I'm typing nonsense words. :)
     
    Aardvark, Nov 30, 2007
    #10
  11. Aardvark wrote:

    > On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 03:13:24 +0000, thanatoid wrote:
    >
    >> As to whether spelling *matters*, and if so, under what circumcisions,
    >> well, that's something we don't REALLY want to get into, do we now...?
    >>

    >
    > LOL Surely you meant 'circumstances' :)
    >
    >> P.S.
    >> "Spelt" ! Nice touch!

    >
    > In the UK the word 'spelled' is rarely, if ever, used as past participle
    > of the verb 'spell'. In fact as I type this, a red wavy line has appeared
    > under the word 'spelled', indicating that my UK English spellchecker
    > thinks I'm typing nonsense words. :)


    I occasionally write "smelt". Because that's the name of a tasty kind of
    fish. Else, I'd have never spelt it that way. Meanwhile, the lumberjack
    felt the tree with a big saw, someone belt the cat, the jelly was
    adequately gelt, and her eyes welt up with tears.


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project - http://improve-usenet.org
     
    Blinky the Shark, Nov 30, 2007
    #11
  12. Andy Petro

    thanatoid Guest

    Aardvark <> wrote in
    news:aHT3j.8065$:

    > On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 03:13:24 +0000, thanatoid wrote:
    >
    >> As to whether spelling *matters*, and if so, under what
    >> circumcisions, well, that's something we don't REALLY want
    >> to get into, do we now...?
    >>

    >
    > LOL Surely you meant 'circumstances' :)


    Surely you noticed the "c and c" disclaimer at the bottom...? It
    was a partial typo and I left it. Sometimes the spell checkers
    give hilarious results.

    >> P.S.
    >> "Spelt" ! Nice touch!

    >
    > In the UK the word 'spelled' is rarely, if ever, used as
    > past participle of the verb 'spell'.


    I know that, I was just /trying/ - apparently unsuccessfully -
    to be funny.

    > In fact as I type
    > this, a red wavy line has appeared under the word
    > 'spelled', indicating that my UK English spellchecker
    > thinks I'm typing nonsense words. :)
     
    thanatoid, Dec 1, 2007
    #12
  13. Andy Petro

    Aardvark Guest

    On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 10:25:13 -0800, Blinky the Shark wrote:

    > Aardvark wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 03:13:24 +0000, thanatoid wrote:
    >>
    >>> As to whether spelling *matters*, and if so, under what circumcisions,
    >>> well, that's something we don't REALLY want to get into, do we now...?
    >>>
    >>>

    >> LOL Surely you meant 'circumstances' :)
    >>
    >>> P.S.
    >>> "Spelt" ! Nice touch!

    >>
    >> In the UK the word 'spelled' is rarely, if ever, used as past
    >> participle of the verb 'spell'. In fact as I type this, a red wavy line
    >> has appeared under the word 'spelled', indicating that my UK English
    >> spellchecker thinks I'm typing nonsense words. :)

    >
    > I occasionally write "smelt". Because that's the name of a tasty kind
    > of fish. Else, I'd have never spelt it that way. Meanwhile, the
    > lumberjack felt the tree with a big saw, someone belt the cat, the jelly
    > was adequately gelt, and her eyes welt up with tears.


    :)
     
    Aardvark, Dec 1, 2007
    #13
  14. Andy Petro

    Aardvark Guest

    On Sat, 01 Dec 2007 00:18:56 +0000, thanatoid wrote:

    > Surely you noticed the "c and c" disclaimer at the bottom...? It was a
    > partial typo and I left it. Sometimes the spell checkers give hilarious
    > results.
    >


    I saw that but had no idea what it meant. Please explain.

    >>> P.S.
    >>> "Spelt" ! Nice touch!

    >>
    >> In the UK the word 'spelled' is rarely, if ever, used as past
    >> participle of the verb 'spell'.

    >
    > I know that, I was just /trying/ - apparently unsuccessfully - to be
    > funny.


    I'm usually pretty laid back about most things but when it comes to
    various (mis)uses of the English language I find that my blood
    occasionally boils. Some Americanese words are slipping into common use
    in everyday English (one thing that really pisses me off is the use of
    the noun 'parent' as a verb).

    This is something up with which I have difficulty in putting. :)
     
    Aardvark, Dec 1, 2007
    #14
  15. Andy Petro

    Oldus Fartus Guest

    "Aardvark" <> wrote in message
    news:pl34j.73$...


    >
    > This is something up with which I have difficulty in putting. :)


    Reminds me that my lady friend (MLF) claims I always end my sentences with a
    proposition.

    --
    Cheers
    Oldus Fartus
     
    Oldus Fartus, Dec 1, 2007
    #15
  16. Andy Petro

    thanatoid Guest

    Aardvark <> wrote in
    news:pl34j.73$:

    > On Sat, 01 Dec 2007 00:18:56 +0000, thanatoid wrote:
    >
    >> Surely you noticed the "c and c" disclaimer at the
    >> bottom...? It was a partial typo and I left it. Sometimes
    >> the spell checkers give hilarious results.
    >>

    >
    > I saw that but had no idea what it meant. Please explain.


    orig:
    "C. and C. That was intentional. Joke! Haaar!"

    transl.:
    Circumcisions and circumstances. That was a typo and I left it
    (i.e. /kind of/ intentional). It's a fairly lame joke. [Gurgling
    sound indicating joy emitted by fat losers and mythical
    pirates].

    <SNIP>

    > I'm usually pretty laid back about most things but when it
    > comes to various (mis)uses of the English language I find
    > that my blood occasionally boils. Some Americanese words
    > are slipping into common use in everyday English (one thing
    > that really pisses me off is the use of the noun 'parent'
    > as a verb).
    >
    > This is something up with which I have difficulty in
    > putting. :)


    This is slightly different and I just mentioned it somewhere a
    few days ago, but an OLD /and/ all-time "favorite" of mine is "I
    could care less".

    Could you really, moron? is what I always feel like saying.

    Sigh.

    Everything is dying. If they had at least adopted nazdat, but
    NO, it had to be just general ugly degeneration.
     
    thanatoid, Dec 1, 2007
    #16
  17. Andy Petro

    thanatoid Guest

    "Oldus Fartus" <> wrote in
    news:4750c63c$0$24187$
    ..au:

    > "Aardvark" <> wrote in message
    > news:pl34j.73$...
    >
    >
    >>
    >> This is something up with which I have difficulty in
    >> putting. :)

    >
    > Reminds me that my lady friend (MLF) claims I always end my
    > sentences with a proposition.
    >


    MLF or MiLF? ;-)

    If she is a REAL lady then I would imagine she obliges with
    pleasure.
     
    thanatoid, Dec 1, 2007
    #17
  18. Andy Petro

    Oldus Fartus Guest

    "thanatoid" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns99F8EA660C30Bthanexit@66.250.146.158...
    > "Oldus Fartus" <> wrote in
    > news:4750c63c$0$24187$
    > .au:
    >
    >> "Aardvark" <> wrote in message
    >> news:pl34j.73$...
    >>
    >>
    >>>
    >>> This is something up with which I have difficulty in
    >>> putting. :)

    >>
    >> Reminds me that my lady friend (MLF) claims I always end my
    >> sentences with a proposition.
    >>

    >
    > MLF or MiLF? ;-)
    >
    > If she is a REAL lady then I would imagine she obliges with
    > pleasure.


    Doesn't work like that!

    She claims that if I was a gentleman I wouldn't ask her to do such
    disgusting things.

    --
    Cheers
    Oldus Fartus
     
    Oldus Fartus, Dec 1, 2007
    #18
  19. Andy Petro

    Aardvark Guest

    On Sat, 01 Dec 2007 04:58:26 +0000, thanatoid wrote:

    > Aardvark <> wrote in
    > news:pl34j.73$:
    >
    >> On Sat, 01 Dec 2007 00:18:56 +0000, thanatoid wrote:
    >>
    >>> Surely you noticed the "c and c" disclaimer at the bottom...? It was a
    >>> partial typo and I left it. Sometimes the spell checkers give
    >>> hilarious results.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> I saw that but had no idea what it meant. Please explain.

    >
    > orig:
    > "C. and C. That was intentional. Joke! Haaar!"
    >
    > transl.:
    > Circumcisions and circumstances. That was a typo and I left it (i.e.
    > /kind of/ intentional). It's a fairly lame joke. [Gurgling sound
    > indicating joy emitted by fat losers and mythical pirates].
    >
    > <SNIP>
    >
    >> I'm usually pretty laid back about most things but when it comes to
    >> various (mis)uses of the English language I find that my blood
    >> occasionally boils. Some Americanese words are slipping into common use
    >> in everyday English (one thing that really pisses me off is the use of
    >> the noun 'parent' as a verb).
    >>
    >> This is something up with which I have difficulty in putting. :)

    >
    > This is slightly different and I just mentioned it somewhere a few days
    > ago, but an OLD /and/ all-time "favorite" of mine is "I could care
    > less".
    >
    > Could you really, moron? is what I always feel like saying.
    >
    > Sigh.
    >
    > Everything is dying. If they had at least adopted nazdat, but NO, it had
    > to be just general ugly degeneration.


    Let's face it mate. We've both turned into grumpy old curmudgeons :)
     
    Aardvark, Dec 1, 2007
    #19
  20. Andy Petro

    thanatoid Guest

    Aardvark <> wrote in
    news:R4c4j.292$:

    > On Sat, 01 Dec 2007 04:58:26 +0000, thanatoid wrote:
    >
    >> Aardvark <> wrote in
    >> news:pl34j.73$:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 01 Dec 2007 00:18:56 +0000, thanatoid wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Surely you noticed the "c and c" disclaimer at the
    >>>> bottom...? It was a partial typo and I left it.
    >>>> Sometimes the spell checkers give hilarious results.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> I saw that but had no idea what it meant. Please explain.

    >>
    >> orig:
    >> "C. and C. That was intentional. Joke! Haaar!"
    >>
    >> transl.:
    >> Circumcisions and circumstances. That was a typo and I
    >> left it (i.e. /kind of/ intentional). It's a fairly lame
    >> joke. [Gurgling sound indicating joy emitted by fat losers
    >> and mythical pirates].
    >>
    >> <SNIP>
    >>
    >>> I'm usually pretty laid back about most things but when
    >>> it comes to various (mis)uses of the English language I
    >>> find that my blood occasionally boils. Some Americanese
    >>> words are slipping into common use in everyday English
    >>> (one thing that really pisses me off is the use of the
    >>> noun 'parent' as a verb).
    >>>
    >>> This is something up with which I have difficulty in
    >>> putting. :)

    >>
    >> This is slightly different and I just mentioned it
    >> somewhere a few days ago, but an OLD /and/ all-time
    >> "favorite" of mine is "I could care less".
    >>
    >> Could you really, moron? is what I always feel like
    >> saying.
    >>
    >> Sigh.
    >>
    >> Everything is dying. If they had at least adopted nazdat,
    >> but NO, it had to be just general ugly degeneration.

    >
    > Let's face it mate. We've both turned into grumpy old
    > curmudgeons :)


    Frankly, I think I was born like this and always was one. My
    father was universally feared - someone who worked with him just
    told me 2 days ago he made people SORT OLD PAPERWORK ETC.
    ALPHABETICALLY BEFORE THROWING IT IN THE TRASH.

    Can you BELIEVE THAT!!!!????
     
    thanatoid, Dec 1, 2007
    #20
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